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Re: Crates, Chests and Boxes... oh my!! - And Markings.

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  • raynersteve
    Hi Peggy & John; In a related ancecdote, Captain John Peebles, Grenadier Company, 42nd Royal Highland Regiment of Foot twice mentions having bought wine from
    Message 1 of 36 , Feb 1, 2008
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      Hi Peggy & John;

      In a related ancecdote, Captain John Peebles, Grenadier Company, 42nd
      "Royal Highland" Regiment of Foot twice mentions having bought wine
      from a Mr. Gracie at New York:

      "Thursday 9th. [December, 1779.]...
      "Went to N:York about the ship mess gave in a list to Mr. Gracie of
      what things we want in Town which he is to compleat in two or three
      days" p. 314.

      "Tuesday 27th. Novr. 1781 fine wr. bot. some wine & left Town, a
      great deal of it broke Mr. Gracie you must make it good..." p. 496.

      Tut-tut, Mr. Gracie!

      PEEBLES, John; "John Peebles' American War, 1776-1782." Gruber, Ira,
      ed. Stackpole Books, Mechanicsburg, PA 1998.

      Best Regards,

      Steve Rayner

      --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, Sgt42RHR@... wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > Peggy, if I recall from an earlier post, some of the extant examples
      had
      > bottoms that were let into a dado, and would have been much
      stronger. Kind of
      > depends what was going in the crate; lighter stuff could have gotten
      by with
      > bottoms just nailed on as in the plans. Heavier stuff would have
      required
      > letting the bottom into a groove cut into each side.
      >
      > Just my 2 pence worth.
      >
      > Cheers,
      > John
      >
      > peg11thgen@... writes:
      >
      > Regarding these BAR plans-
      > I asked my father-in-law, a cabinet-maker, to take a look, and his
      > question is this: Why did they go to the trouble to rabbet the side
      > panels, and then just nail the bottom on instead of setting it in? The
      > cargo was pretty heavy to take a chance like that. He thinks they must
      > have been smarter than that.
      > Does anyone know whether these plans are copying an original chest?
      > Any other comments on that detail?
      > Peggy
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > True terror is to wake up one morning and discover that your high
      school
      > class is running the country.
      >
      > Kurt Vonnegut
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > **************Biggest Grammy Award surprises of all time on AOL
      Music.
      >
      (http://music.aol.com/grammys/pictures/never-won-a-grammy?NCID=aolcmp003000000025
      > 48)
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • raynersteve
      Nails from Fort Stanwix. Hi All; I just wanted to follow up with a worthwhile resource for this topic. “Casemates and Cannonballs” has a section about
      Message 36 of 36 , Mar 2, 2008
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        Nails from Fort Stanwix.

        Hi All;

        I just wanted to follow up with a worthwhile resource for this topic.

        “Casemates and Cannonballs” has a section about nails recovered during
        the archaeological investigations at Fort Stanwix.

        “Rose-head (fig 31a) Rose-head nails appear in all sizes but not all
        specimens of this type have rounded heads; many were flat with only
        short slopes near the edges.” p. 51.

        [In other words - the term ‘rose-head’ is used in a sense similar to
        Band-Aid, Coke or Kleenex, rather than precisely.]

        Fig. 31 indeed shows a range of spikes and nails. Only a few examples
        of the approximately 24,600 nails found are illustrated, of course.

        A few examples are nails in the range of 1-5 / 8” to 2-1 / 8” These
        tend to have tapered square shanks ending in a sharp point, and
        flattened or just slightly domed heads.

        There are some larger nails in the range of 4-1 / 4” to 4-1 / 2”, one
        of which has something resembling a ‘rose-head'.

        Several large spikes are illustrated also, 6 to 8” in length, as well
        as a range of nails and staples for specialized applications.

        See pages p. 51-55 for text, illustrations and considerable
        statistical analysis.

        It seems that the size range of 1-5 / 8” to 2-1 / 8” would be suitable
        for light carpentry work, such as chests.

        “Casemates and Cannonballs” by the way is a very good and in my
        opinion, very useful resource. Lots of findngs on personal items,
        utensils, tools, ceramics and glass found at the fort.

        Hanson, Lee, and Hsu, Dick Ping; “Casemates and Cannonballs,
        Archaeological Investigations at Fort Stanwix National Park.” Inited
        States Department of the Interior, National Park Service, USGPO,
        Washington DC 1975.

        Best Regards,

        Steve Rayner
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