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Re: Crates, Chests and Boxes... oh my!! - And Markings.

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  • raynersteve
    Hi Peggy; The BAR(NW) plan by Ed Schweinfurth follows the dimensions and methods of original chests closely. There were several variations of similar chests -
    Message 1 of 36 , Feb 1, 2008
      Hi Peggy;

      The BAR(NW) plan by Ed Schweinfurth follows the dimensions and methods
      of original chests closely.

      There were several variations of similar chests - in fact no two of
      the six surviving chests that I know of are exactly alike.

      The rabbeted side/end junction was common. Sometimes the bottom was
      rabbetted, sometimes it was just nailed or pegged to the bottom. Short
      iron reinforcing straps are found on some but not on others.

      As to why the construction of the all important bottom varies... well,
      there was a balance between cost and security even back then. Much the
      same factors apply to packaging today. The packaging is only intended
      to convey the goods to the destination. If it is reusable after that,
      that's a bonus for the end-user.

      Best Regards,

      Steve Rayner
      PS: Who has never been in either packaging design or shipping, but has
      spent an un-natural amount of time trotting between the departments,
      factories and warehouses to trouble-shoot other peoples' 'great
      cost-saving ideas.' <;)


      --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, "peg11thgen" <peg11thgen@...> wrote:
      >
      > Regarding these BAR plans-
      > I asked my father-in-law, a cabinet-maker, to take a look, and his
      > question is this: Why did they go to the trouble to rabbet the side
      > panels, and then just nail the bottom on instead of setting it in? The
      > cargo was pretty heavy to take a chance like that. He thinks they must
      > have been smarter than that.
      > Does anyone know whether these plans are copying an original chest?
      > Any other comments on that detail?
      > Peggy
      >
      >
      > --- In Revlist@yahoogroups.com, you wrote:
      >
      > > >It is an -excellent-
      > > >article by Ed Schweinfurth on how to re-create the simple liquor
      > > >shipping chest of the era.
      > >
      > > Fortunately we have the Internet Archive..
      > >
      > >
      >
      http://web.archive.org/web/20050904044200/http://www.fieldmusic.com/barshot/box.htm
      > >
      > > Comes up just fine..
      > >
      > > Tony
      > >
      > >
      >
    • raynersteve
      Nails from Fort Stanwix. Hi All; I just wanted to follow up with a worthwhile resource for this topic. “Casemates and Cannonballs” has a section about
      Message 36 of 36 , Mar 2, 2008
        Nails from Fort Stanwix.

        Hi All;

        I just wanted to follow up with a worthwhile resource for this topic.

        “Casemates and Cannonballs” has a section about nails recovered during
        the archaeological investigations at Fort Stanwix.

        “Rose-head (fig 31a) Rose-head nails appear in all sizes but not all
        specimens of this type have rounded heads; many were flat with only
        short slopes near the edges.” p. 51.

        [In other words - the term ‘rose-head’ is used in a sense similar to
        Band-Aid, Coke or Kleenex, rather than precisely.]

        Fig. 31 indeed shows a range of spikes and nails. Only a few examples
        of the approximately 24,600 nails found are illustrated, of course.

        A few examples are nails in the range of 1-5 / 8” to 2-1 / 8” These
        tend to have tapered square shanks ending in a sharp point, and
        flattened or just slightly domed heads.

        There are some larger nails in the range of 4-1 / 4” to 4-1 / 2”, one
        of which has something resembling a ‘rose-head'.

        Several large spikes are illustrated also, 6 to 8” in length, as well
        as a range of nails and staples for specialized applications.

        See pages p. 51-55 for text, illustrations and considerable
        statistical analysis.

        It seems that the size range of 1-5 / 8” to 2-1 / 8” would be suitable
        for light carpentry work, such as chests.

        “Casemates and Cannonballs” by the way is a very good and in my
        opinion, very useful resource. Lots of findngs on personal items,
        utensils, tools, ceramics and glass found at the fort.

        Hanson, Lee, and Hsu, Dick Ping; “Casemates and Cannonballs,
        Archaeological Investigations at Fort Stanwix National Park.” Inited
        States Department of the Interior, National Park Service, USGPO,
        Washington DC 1975.

        Best Regards,

        Steve Rayner
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