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Crates, Chests and Boxes... oh my!!

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  • Rick Lawson
    I m finally, after many years in the hobby, outfitting myself for doing full weekend-long Encampment type things!! NOT just Day Tripping like I ve done for
    Message 1 of 36 , Jan 24, 2008
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      I'm finally, after many years in the hobby, outfitting myself for
      doing full weekend-long Encampment type things!! NOT just "Day
      Tripping" like I've done for oh these many decades. I've ordered my
      tent and it's being made as we speak... So, a good friend of mine is
      really handy with the wood working tools and has access to a fully
      stocked co-oped cabinet makers shop.

      We're thinking of making some crates, boxes, etc... for me to:
      A). Store my various different gear in while not in use.
      2). Transport the aforementioned accoutrement's to camp
      III. Have something nice, period looking to use to sit on and
      otherwise flesh out my persona of a middling to well-to-do Tavern
      Keeper / Militia Captain from eastern Mass circa 1775.

      There in lies the rub... if I'm going to go through all the trouble to
      make something custom made, I want it to look as authentic as
      possible. So, do I make a couple shipping type crates and/or boxes and
      then paint them with "TEA" or "RUM" on the side? A couple different
      boxes, all different types, styles, etc...

      I know that G.Godwin and others have "chests" for sale... but how
      Period are they?

      Also, do any of you fine Living Historians know of any Online
      resources where I can see pictures of actual period storage devices?!?
      What would the real thing looked like compared to more recent boxes
      and crates? How are they constructed? Dovetailed nicely finished
      corners or just nailed together pieces of rough boards?

      Yadda-yadda-YMH&OS,
      Rick Lawson, Captain
      Stow Minutemen Co.
      www.stowminutemen.org
    • raynersteve
      Nails from Fort Stanwix. Hi All; I just wanted to follow up with a worthwhile resource for this topic. “Casemates and Cannonballs” has a section about
      Message 36 of 36 , Mar 2, 2008
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        Nails from Fort Stanwix.

        Hi All;

        I just wanted to follow up with a worthwhile resource for this topic.

        “Casemates and Cannonballs” has a section about nails recovered during
        the archaeological investigations at Fort Stanwix.

        “Rose-head (fig 31a) Rose-head nails appear in all sizes but not all
        specimens of this type have rounded heads; many were flat with only
        short slopes near the edges.” p. 51.

        [In other words - the term ‘rose-head’ is used in a sense similar to
        Band-Aid, Coke or Kleenex, rather than precisely.]

        Fig. 31 indeed shows a range of spikes and nails. Only a few examples
        of the approximately 24,600 nails found are illustrated, of course.

        A few examples are nails in the range of 1-5 / 8” to 2-1 / 8” These
        tend to have tapered square shanks ending in a sharp point, and
        flattened or just slightly domed heads.

        There are some larger nails in the range of 4-1 / 4” to 4-1 / 2”, one
        of which has something resembling a ‘rose-head'.

        Several large spikes are illustrated also, 6 to 8” in length, as well
        as a range of nails and staples for specialized applications.

        See pages p. 51-55 for text, illustrations and considerable
        statistical analysis.

        It seems that the size range of 1-5 / 8” to 2-1 / 8” would be suitable
        for light carpentry work, such as chests.

        “Casemates and Cannonballs” by the way is a very good and in my
        opinion, very useful resource. Lots of findngs on personal items,
        utensils, tools, ceramics and glass found at the fort.

        Hanson, Lee, and Hsu, Dick Ping; “Casemates and Cannonballs,
        Archaeological Investigations at Fort Stanwix National Park.” Inited
        States Department of the Interior, National Park Service, USGPO,
        Washington DC 1975.

        Best Regards,

        Steve Rayner
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