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The Kelly's article

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  • magic.seb84
    Hello, I m a french student of Master in Biology. I work on the sensory analysis and I m looking for the article published by Kelly on 1955 talking about the
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 1, 2007
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      Hello, I'm a french student of Master in Biology. I work on the
      sensory analysis and I'm looking for the article published by Kelly on
      1955 talking about the repertory grid named : the psychology of
      personal constructs. In reality, I'm looking for articles in which
      repertory grid is employed in sensory analysis but I would to read the
      original article. If you have any informations about this topic,
      please tell me. Thanks.
      Sébastien.
    • Bob Green
      Sébastien, There is good and bad news. The bad news is that Kelly 1955 is a large 2 volume book, which at a first attempt to read certainly can be difficult,
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 2, 2007
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        Sébastien,

        There is good and bad news. The bad news is that
        Kelly 1955 is a large 2 volume book, which at a
        first attempt to read certainly can be difficult,
        albeit rewarding. There is a 1963 short version
        called: A Theory of Personality, that contains
        just the first 3 chapters. Kelly's paper: A
        brief introduction to personal construct theory,
        in Bannister D (1970) Perspectives in Personal
        Construct Theory , is a more user friendly first introduction.

        Something that is very useful if you wanted to
        access Kelly (1955) is to type the following
        phrase into the search engine, google: "onrush of events" + Kelly

        Select a hit associated with google books and
        there is a searchable copy of Kelly's book

        For all things PCP: see http://www.pcp-net.de/info/centre.html

        Lastly, some possible references of interest -
        they contain the word 'sensory' and PCP/PCT:

        Blakemore, S. J. (2003). “Deluding the motor
        system.” Consciousness and cognition 12(4): 647-55.
        How do we know that our own actions
        belong to us? How are we able to distinguish
        self-generated sensory events from those that
        arise externally? In this paper, I will briefly
        discuss experiments that were designed to
        investigate these questions. In particular, I
        will review psychophysical and neuroimaging
        studies that have investigated how we recognise
        the consequences of our own actions, and why
        patients with delusions of control confuse
        self-produced and externally produced actions and
        sensations. Studies investigating the failure of
        this 'self-monitoring' mechanism in patients with
        delusions of control will be discussed in the
        context of the hypothesis that overactivity in
        the parietal cortex and the cerebellum contribute
        to the misattribution of an action to an external source.

        Deliza, R., H. MacFie, et al. (2005). “The
        Consumer Sensory Perception of Passion-fruit
        Juice using Free-choice Profiling.” Journal of Sensory Studies 20(1): 17-27.
        Free-choice profiling (FCP) was carried
        out in order to investigate how naive consumers
        (who had never tried the product before)
        described and perceived passion-fruit juice. This
        method allows participants to use their own
        attributes to describe and quantify food products
        and beverages. The study used four different
        samples of passion-fruit juice, analyzed by 10
        consumers in three replicates. The data were
        analyzed by using generalized Procrustes
        analysis. The first and second dimension
        accounted for 78.7% of the variance. The product
        consensus configuration revealed that assessors
        were able to reproduce samples' description, and
        also to differentiate samples. Free-choice
        profiling is a useful method for describing
        consumer perception of passion-fruit juice.
        (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2005 APA ) (journal abstract)

        Gámbaro, A., A. M. a. Giménez, et al. (2004).
        “Association of strawberry yogurt sensory
        properties with product composition by procrustes
        analysis.” Journal of Sensory Studies 19(4): 293-306.
        The flavor of eight samples of
        commercial strawberry yogurt was studied by
        Free-Choice Profile analysis (FCP). Generalized
        Procrustes Analysis (GPA) applied to FCP allowed
        differentiation between samples and highlighted
        flavor attributes responsible for the observed
        differences. The relation between sensory and
        physicochemical datasets was studied by means of
        GPA. Those samples with higher carbohydrate
        content were perceived as sweeter, having
        stronger strawberry flavor, and with more dairy
        and yogurt flavors. Samples with higher
        titratable acidity, ash and protein content were
        perceived as more acidic and higher in intensity
        of "faulty" or "defective" flavors. Higher
        moisture content was associated with lower
        intensity of "dairy" flavors (creamy, dairy, and
        yogurt) and greater intensity of rancid flavor.
        It is concluded that, though not often used to
        this end, GPA is a suitable method to study the
        relationship of sensory and instrumental
        measurements. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2005 APA ) (journal abstract)

        Knoblich, G. and R. Flach (2003). “Action
        identity: evidence from self-recognition,
        prediction, and coordination.” Consciousness and cognition 12(4): 620-32.
        Prior research suggests that the action
        system is responsible for creating an immediate
        sense of self by determining whether certain
        sensations and perceptions are the result of
        one's own actions. In addition, it is assumed
        that declarative, episodic, or autobiographical
        memories create a temporally extended sense of
        self or some form of identity. In the present
        article, we review recent evidence suggesting
        that action (procedural) knowledge also forms
        part of a person's identity, an action identity,
        so to speak. Experiments that addressed
        self-recognition of past actions, prediction, and
        coordination provide ample evidence for this
        assumption. The phenomena observed in these
        experiments can be explained by the assumption
        that observing an action results in the
        activation of action representations, the more
        so, when the action observed corresponds to the
        way in which the observer would produce it.

        Monteleone, E., M. M. Raats, et al. (1997).
        “Perceptions of starchy food dishes: application
        of the Repertory Grid Method.” Appetite 28(3): 255-65.
        The Repertory Grid Method (RGM) was
        applied to obtain an understanding of the
        characteristics used by U.K. consumers in
        discriminating amongst different common starchy
        food dishes, including potatoes, rice and pasta.
        Twenty-nine subjects generated a large number of
        constructs, relating to perceived nutrition,
        health physiological effect, sensory, and use
        attributes of these products. Coupling of RGM
        with Generalized Procrustes Analysis produced
        detailed qualitative and quantitative information
        describing common and individual characteristics
        of particular dishes. The results indicate that
        starchy foods are in general seen as "filling",
        but specific products are clearly discriminated
        along two dimensions, predominantly relating to
        nutritional value ("healthy", "fatty",
        "fattening") and sensory/functional
        characteristics ("versatile", "bland", "boring",
        "a meal in itself"). Along with further analysis
        of the sensory descriptors, these results
        indicate the utility and efficiency of RGM for
        clarifying consumer views of broad food
        categories, while identifying the potential
        acceptability of particular starchy foods in fulfilling current dietary goals.

        Perkins, R. E. and A. B. Hill (1985). “Cognitive
        and affective aspects of boredom.” British
        Journal of Psychology 76(2): 221-234.
        Tested the assumption that monotony in
        sensory stimulation is a necessary and sufficient
        cause of boredom in 3 experiments. In Exp I, with
        24 undergraduates, a repertory grid technique was
        used to test 3 hypotheses: (1) boredom is
        associated with subjective monotony, (2) boredom
        is associated with a high degree of frustration,
        and (3) boredom arises when stimulation lacks
        meaning for the individual. In Exp II, with 26
        6th-form college students, the effects of shifts
        during tasks were tested. In Exp III, 18 College
        of Further Education students and 24
        comprehensive school 6th formers were used to
        examine the constructions made of interesting,
        disliked, and boring experiences and to relate
        these constructions to the satisfaction and
        frustration of motives. Results support
        Hypotheses 1 and 2, but not 3. A shift from
        interest to boredom was accompanied by an
        experience of greater subjective monotony.
        Instrumental constructs associated with need
        satisfaction distinguished between interesting,
        disliked, and boring experiences. (41 ref) ((c)
        1997 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

        Westerink, J. and S. Kozlov (2004). “Freshness in
        Oral Care: Attributes and Time-dependency of a
        Multidimensional, Dynamic Concept.” Journal of Sensory Studies 19(3): 171-192.
        This article describes an exploration of
        the concept of 'oral freshness' for as far as it
        is important in oral care. It intends to consider
        the most important mouth sensations and cognitive
        connotations, including (but not restricted to)
        the well-known effect of menthol in toothpaste.
        Two aspects were given attention: (1) The
        attributes that together form the concept of oral
        freshness were investigated using a 'personal
        construct approach' (Kelly 1955). This method
        consists of unbiased, structured interviews with
        subjects, and ultimately yields attribute
        dimensions that the subjects have in common. (2)
        The intensity of the freshness sensation over
        time was investigated using the Time-Intensity
        method. Subjects gave repeated freshness
        judgments every few seconds after the intake of a
        freshness-related stimulus, and continued to do
        so after the stimulus had left their mouth. In
        addition we asked for 'overall' freshness
        judgments directly after the TI-measurements and
        after 2 months. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2005 APA ) (journal abstract)

        Bob
      • John
        Hi Sébastien, I d like to thank Bob for going to so much trouble to answer your question. But I could not find the reference he mentioned at Google Books.
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 2, 2007
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          Hi Sébastien,

          I'd like to thank Bob for going to so much trouble to answer your
          question. But I could not find the reference he mentioned at
          Google Books.

          There is an alternative. Amazon provides a similar service and
          the good news is that Amazon has searchable copies of both of Kelly's
          books mentioned.

          Both are accessible, along with other material you might find useful,
          from Kelly's Theory Summarised at
          <http://www.enquirewithin.co.nz/theoryof.htm> and `Understanding
          George Kelly and Personal Construct Theory' at
          http://www.enquirewithin.co.nz/HINTS/skills2.htm.

          John


          --- In RepGrid@yahoogroups.com, "magic.seb84" <magic.seb84@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello, I'm a french student of Master in Biology. I work on the
          > sensory analysis and I'm looking for the article published by Kelly
          on
          > 1955 talking about the repertory grid named : the psychology of
          > personal constructs. In reality, I'm looking for articles in which
          > repertory grid is employed in sensory analysis but I would to read
          the
          > original article. If you have any informations about this topic,
          > please tell me. Thanks.
          > Sébastien.
          >
        • Jane Thomson
          Hi John Do you have any examples of using rep grids with children? I intend to use them with children but feel I would have to scaffold the children s thinking
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 17, 2007
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            Hi John
            Do you have any examples of using rep grids with children?
            I intend to use them with children but feel I would have to scaffold the children's thinking in the first instance. The children range from 8 year old to 11 year old. I'd appreciate any references to work where the grid has been used with young children.
            Thanks
            Jane
          • mikehpsych@aol.com
            Jane As an educational psychologist I have lots of examples of using grids with children. Regards Mike [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 17, 2007
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              Jane

              As an educational psychologist I have lots of examples of using grids with
              children.

              Regards

              Mike






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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