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Education?

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  • ruben hansen
    Hi Greg and Gordon What kind of education do you have? Now we have been reading your interpretations of medical reports for a long time without any
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 3, 1997
      Hi Greg and Gordon

      What kind of education do you have?
      Now we have been reading your interpretations of medical reports for
      a long time without any clarification of the subject, is glutamine dangerous
      or not. Are you at all competent to make this kind of judgements? or are
      both of you just two laymens with an opinion? Where is the medical doctors
      who used to comment on everything on this list? Or are both of you just
      believers that the truth "is out there on the Internet" ?

      Ruben
    • gts
      ... I have a BS and a partial Masters, but not in medicine. ... Something here needs to be understood: I am not prescribing anything to anyone. You don t need
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 1, 1999
        > What kind of education do you have?

        I have a BS and a partial Masters, but not in medicine.

        > Are you at all competent to make this kind of judgements?

        Something here needs to be understood:

        I am not prescribing anything to anyone. You don't need to trust my
        judgment. If anything, you need to decide whether to trust the judgment of a
        self-proclaimed expert like Greg. Greg has a health website to which he
        sends people. He promotes himself as knowledgable and trustworthy on these
        subjects. And while he is more knowledgable than some people, one must
        always remember that a little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing.

        My role is that of a consumer watchdog agency, you might say, and I have
        determined to my own satisfaction that Greg is not really sure of what he's
        doing. I know this because 1) he denies the risks of his recommendations,
        and because 2) he does not properly understand the theory that underlies
        them, and because 3) he does not even understand the basic principles of
        scientific enquiry.

        Number 1 above concerns me the most, because the health of other people is
        at stake.

        I'm sure you've heard the expression that "there is no free lunch". The
        expression is true also for medicines and health supplements. Nothing is
        without some risk or downside of some kind. No health benefits come without
        a price, where the price is measured usually in known side-effects and/or
        uncertainties.

        One way to determine the competency of a health professional is to ask him
        about the risks of his recommendations. If he denies the existence of risks
        then you can be pretty sure he is incompetent.

        Greg denies the very existence of the most obvious risk inherent in his
        glutamine conconction. That is a sign of his incompetence. I just happen to
        care enough about the health of other people to think it's worth bringing it
        to light.

        -gts
      • Greg Watson
        ... I make no pretence that I am nothing but an informed layman, who has read very extensively and has spent the last 3 years on a self education program about
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 1, 1999
          ruben hansen wrote:
          >
          > From: ruben hansen <ruben.hansen@...>
          >
          > Hi Greg and Gordon
          >
          > What kind of education do you have?
          > Now we have been reading your interpretations of medical reports for
          > a long time without any clarification of the subject, is glutamine dangerous
          > or not. Are you at all competent to make this kind of judgements? or are
          > both of you just two laymens with an opinion? Where is the medical doctors
          > who used to comment on everything on this list? Or are both of you just
          > believers that the truth "is out there on the Internet" ?

          I make no pretence that I am nothing but an informed layman, who has
          read very extensively and has spent the last 3 years on a self education
          program about my body. My daughter has finished her 2nd year in biology
          at a local Uni and I use a lot of her text books as reference material.
          We talk a lot about human biology and she sometimes takes my questions
          that she can't answer or I can't find the answers for to her teachers.

          I am a retired Electronics Engineer.

          I know of NO data anywhere which shows that ORAL Glutamine even in doses
          of 22.5g is dangerous. The opposite is quite the norm with many ....
          many medical papers reporting body wide advantages to supplementing with
          Glutamine.

          I have based the protocol I use on these published medical papers:

          http://www.ozemail.com.au/~gowatson/protocol.html

          If you read this protocol, you will see that I have never suggested the
          use of isolated supplements of any kind and that I always eat a good
          quality protein source before I take my powder mix.

          (In that case, wouldn't the glutamine combine with other amino acids in
          the protein and thus not have a secretagogue effect? - Ellis)

          Glutamine is safe. Read the following paper:

          http://www.ozemail.com.au/~gowatson/Glutamine.html

          > Ruben

          Hi Ruben,

          Thanks for the feedback.

          Hope this is of value.

          --
          Good Health & Long Life,
          Greg Watson,
          http://www.ozemail.com.au/~gowatson
        • ruben hansen
          Hi GTS Thanks for your reply. At first glance I thougth this was a very serious site, but as time goes by I get more and more worried. Now we also starts to
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 2, 1999
            Hi GTS

            Thanks for your reply. At first glance I thougth this was a very serious
            site, but as time goes by I get more and more worried. Now we also
            starts to discuss EM (ElectroMagnetic) fields, magnets, Earth radiation,
            and all other kind of spooky things, guess Mulder and Scully will comment
            tomorrow. Could we please try to find out if hGH really is making us any
            younger, try to make some serious investigation. Earlier we had this questioning
            scheme, maybe it could cover other rgHG like GABA, Glutamine, etc.
            In my own case I had a lot of good results from Glutamine, Creatine and
            other things from Greg's list (or was it my own?) I can see significant results
            in my sports activity, and my relatives tells me, that I look a lot younger
            after only a few months on this protocol.

            Ellis, please try to keep this list serious, based on facts, and not on
            assumptions.

            (Ruben, you seem to think that the subject of ElectroMagnetic fields and
            magnets is off topic... but it was suggested that it affects your body in
            such a way that it will vary melatonin... that makes it in topic... Now,
            how am I supposed to know if that is true or not, "spooky" or not? I ask
            questions when I don't know or need a clarification, or I might comment if
            I have something to say, but in general I post everything that is sent here
            if it has to do with rejuvenation therapies. If you would like to know more
            about rHGH, ask your questions or tell us your experiences, and hopefully you
            will get some discussion in the topics of your interest. You are also welcome
            to answer other posts. - Ellis)


            Ruben

            EXT gts wrote:

            > From: "gts" <gordonswobe@...>
            >
            > > What kind of education do you have?
            >
            > I have a BS and a partial Masters, but not in medicine.
            >
            > > Are you at all competent to make this kind of judgements?
            >
            > Something here needs to be understood:
            >
            > I am not prescribing anything to anyone. You don't need to trust my
            > judgment. If anything, you need to decide whether to trust the judgment of a
            > self-proclaimed expert like Greg. Greg has a health website to which he
            > sends people. He promotes himself as knowledgable and trustworthy on these
            > subjects. And while he is more knowledgable than some people, one must
            > always remember that a little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing.
            >
            > My role is that of a consumer watchdog agency, you might say, and I have
            > determined to my own satisfaction that Greg is not really sure of what he's
            > doing. I know this because 1) he denies the risks of his recommendations,
            > and because 2) he does not properly understand the theory that underlies
            > them, and because 3) he does not even understand the basic principles of
            > scientific enquiry.
            >
            > Number 1 above concerns me the most, because the health of other people is
            > at stake.
            >
            > I'm sure you've heard the expression that "there is no free lunch". The
            > expression is true also for medicines and health supplements. Nothing is
            > without some risk or downside of some kind. No health benefits come without
            > a price, where the price is measured usually in known side-effects and/or
            > uncertainties.
            >
            > One way to determine the competency of a health professional is to ask him
            > about the risks of his recommendations. If he denies the existence of risks
            > then you can be pretty sure he is incompetent.
            >
            > Greg denies the very existence of the most obvious risk inherent in his
            > glutamine conconction. That is a sign of his incompetence. I just happen to
            > care enough about the health of other people to think it's worth bringing it
            > to light.
            >
            > -gts
            >
          • gts
            ... Of course you re right about this, Ellis. Greg might as well throw his glutamine down the drain and eat a hamburger instead. (Greg disagrees with you on
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 2, 1999
              Greg writes:
              > If you read this protocol, you will see that I have
              > never suggested the use of isolated supplements
              > of any kind and that I always eat a good
              > quality protein source before I take my powder mix.

              Ellis replies:
              > (In that case, wouldn't the glutamine combine with
              > other amino acids in the protein and thus not have
              > a secretagogue effect? - Ellis)

              Of course you're right about this, Ellis.

              Greg might as well throw his glutamine down the drain and eat a hamburger
              instead.

              (Greg disagrees with you on this, too. Who is right? How
              do you know that glutamine will not act if it is combined
              with protein? - Ellis)

              -gts
            • gts
              Hi ruben, I think this is actually a pretty serious list, considering that many people here including myself have made the rather extraordinary decision to
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 3, 1999
                Hi ruben,

                I think this is actually a pretty serious list, considering that many people
                here including myself have made the rather extraordinary decision to inject
                themselves daily with a genetically engineered substance manufactured in the
                guts of germs. :)

                > Could we please try to find out if hGH really is making us any
                > younger, try to make some serious investigation.

                I think it's pretty clear that increasing the body's supply of hGH can
                reverse or slow some of the biomarkers for aging, which might not be exactly
                the same as "making us younger" but comes pretty close.

                > Earlier we had this questioning
                > scheme, maybe it could cover other rgHG like GABA, Glutamine, etc.
                > In my own case I had a lot of good results from Glutamine, Creatine and
                > other things from Greg's list (or was it my own?) I can see significant
                results

                That's good. There is no question that glutamine and some other things can
                cause the pituitary glands of some people to release more growth hormone,
                and creatine has been proven to help athletes and body builders.

                -gts
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