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* * * How does using metformin compare with using insulin?

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  • Don Hinton
    Ellis etal: How does using Metformin to control blood sugar compare with using insulin? Using metformin seems like a safer and easier way to do it. I know
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 17, 2013
      Ellis etal:

      How does using Metformin to control blood sugar compare
      with using insulin? Using metformin seems like a safer and
      easier way to do it.

      I know that years ago Ward Dean was an advocate of taking a
      small amount of metformin after meals for life extension
      purposes...


      Ellis: Hello Don.

      I'm glad you asked this question. It gives me a chance to
      defend my use of insulin, which I have used every day for
      more than 10 years.

      Metformin ("Glucophage") works by making the insulin that
      your pancreas releases more effective. Somehow, it lessens
      resistance to insulin. Therefore, it lowers average blood
      sugar. The pancreas, however, continues to release insulin.
      This insulin does a better job, because resistance to insulin
      is lower, so average blood glucose levels are lower.

      Since the pancreas continues to release insulin when you use
      metformin, it slowly burns out.

      "Slowly" is so slow that nobody will blame the doctor for his
      bad advice to prescribe metformin, when bad things start to
      happen 20 or 30 years later for having caused the death of
      the pancreas (or of the patient...)

      Especially not, since it is STANDARD ADVICE from most medical
      doctors.

      Injected insulin substitutes for the insulin that your pancreas
      would have released... so your pancreas doesn't release insulin
      on that occasion, or perhaps it releases less than it would have.

      THAT IS PRECISELY WHY I USE INSULIN: SO THAT MY PANCREAS
      WILL NOT HAVE TO WORK, WHEN I TAKE THE LOAD OFF OF IT.

      The MYTH is that once you inject insulin, your pancreas will
      depend on injected insulin. The myth is that your pancreas
      goes to "sleep" and so you are now a diabetic.

      But "According to Ellis" based on my experience with insulin,
      this MYTH is NOT TRUE, FALSE... and A BIG MISTAKE.

      I say this based on my personal experience after more than
      20,000 doses of insulin, several times each day, and about
      25,000 blood glucose tests, each day for more than 10 years
      (since 2002).

      My pancreas is definitely still working. If I do NOT take insulin
      but I do drink a glass of orange juice, my blood sugar will
      certainly come down to about 105-110 mg/dl. It does not
      come down by the force of gravity... it comes down by the
      force of insulin which can only come from my pancreas.

      And after 20,000 doses of insulin, I have not had brain damage...
      I am not insulin dependent... and I do not have high insulin
      resistance. In fact, I have low insulin resistance. Off the charts.
      Like an athlete... but I am not an athlete.

      I call all this "The Insulin Paradox"... The paradox is that you
      would think that by injecting insulin it would RAISE the amount
      of insulin floating about in my blood... Instead, it doesn't go UP
      (which would be an increase in insulin resistance...) It goes
      DOWN.

      The REASON it goes down "according to Ellis" is because the
      injected insulin makes my blood glucose go DOWN... so my
      pancreas doesn't have to shoot out A LOT of insulin.

      In short: every single thing that doctors told me would happen to
      me in 2002 for using insulin (when I posted that I had injected a
      tiny dose of insulin as an experiment to see what would happen)
      has not happened yet. And I expect it will never happen because
      IT ISN'T TRUE. They THINK it is true, but it is false.

      I do not blame doctors for being alarmed that I was taking
      insulin, because this is what they all learned in med school, and
      from books, and other doctors. Everybody repeats the same
      false information: "insulin is very dangerous"... so it becomes
      the accepted truth.

      I thought it was true, too, because I had heard this all my life...
      but I wanted to see what would happen, with a single dose, to
      write about it here on Rejuvenation... nothing bad happened
      after the first dose, so I tried a second dose... then another...
      and another...

      When it became apparent to me that my blood glucose was
      BETTER than before I had tried insulin, I simply never quit.

      But Truth is Truth. It does not change if the majority believes
      something that is false and mistaken.

      Most doctors take it for granted that insulin is extremely dangerous
      and they should first try to control diabetes with diet, exercise,
      and metformin. Diet and exercise, I agree with... metormin, I
      am sure is a mistake on their part "according to Ellis."

      And according to Dr. Bernstein, too. So I am not alone.

      Somebody wrote this to me, today:

      "I went to see Dr. Bernstein last April.

      My A1C was 5.4 and my local doctor said I didn't have
      diabetes and I was fine.

      Dr. Bernstein said I had burned out my pancreatic
      beta cells and they couldn't make enough insulin
      anymore.

      Now I use insulin: 10 units of Levemir in the morning and
      8 units at bedtime. I use 3 units of Humulin R before meals.

      The last time I had my A1C checked, it was 4.9, which is the
      upper limit of Dr. Bernstein's normal range."

      (Note: I also use 3 units of Humulin R before meals. I do not
      take Levemir or Lantus, which are long-lasting insulin, because
      I like to "think like a pancreas".)

      I thank doctors on Rejuvenation for worrying that I was going
      to harm myself, but nothing that they said would happen,
      happened. They studied it in med school, but it is false.

      What DID happen was that my blood glucose meter told me that
      my blood glucose was down significantly, and so I decided
      to listen to the blood glucose meter, instead of to doctors.

      I DO BELIEVE, however, that my pancreas does not have to
      release as much insulin when my blood sugar is lower than
      it would have been, for whichever reason (injected insulin,
      or aerobic exercise, or metformin, etc.) it is lower.

      Therefore, I am IN FAVOR of using metformin for those persons
      who are not yet diabetic and who are AFRAID to use insulin...

      Something is better than nothing.

      Combine metformin with aerobic exercise (5 minutes ON,
      5 minutes OFF, for several sets...) and low carb diet, and you
      have a "better than nothing" anti-diabetes, anti-aging, and
      good health program. You will probably slow down the
      advance to diabetes, which I think happens in all of us.

      But I AM DEFINITELY NOT IN FAVOR OF A DIABETIC using
      metformin instead of insulin, because he is CAUSING THE SLOW
      DESTRUCTION OF HIS PANCREAS.

      If he has high resistance to insulin, this can be reversed with
      correct diet and exercise, and correct, medical fasting.

      (note: very few doctors know what is a correct medical fast....

      I will have to write more about this, in another post.

      Guaranteed: I know more about correct fasting than most doctors.)

      As far as safety, the correct dose of injected insulin is safer than
      metformin, because the correct dose of insulin has NO SIDE EFFECT,
      and the correct dose of metformin MIGHT HAVE SIDE EFFECTS.

      But an OVERDOSE of insulin, together with an empty stomach,
      or together with not knowing what to do in case of hypoglycemia,
      is more dangerous than metformin. I am not in favor of death
      by insulin.

      But I think I could probably inject a super-overdose of insulin...
      say, 50 units (instead of my usual 3 units, 5 units maximum) and
      I would survive without a problem. I say this because I HAVE SEEN
      diabetics inject 50 units of insulin when their blood sugar is up
      in the clouds... (note: I am a bit crazy, but not so crazy... I will
      NEVER inject 50 iu Humulin R as an experiment to prove that I
      can do it.)

      I am sure I would have a glass of water with A LOT of SUGAR
      dissolved in it, and I would DRINK IT as needed to keep my blood
      glucose ABOVE 100. (IF I was doing this crazy experiment, I would
      want to be CERTAIN that my blood glucose does not come close to
      below 25... so I would stay FAR AWAY from 50 mg/dl also...)

      What I am saying is: using insulin correctly is NOT dangerous.

      I am sure that crossing the streets in London has been more
      dangerous for me than using insulin many times each day for
      more than 10 years. (several times, I almost got run down in
      London, because I was looking the wrong way before I stepped
      into the streets.) I am sure that riding around on a bicycle or
      a motorcycle in traffic is far more dangerous than using insulin
      correctly, which I hope is how I use it.

      So... WHY DO I USE INSULIN and not metformin?

      There are several good reasons. ONE is that insulin gives me a
      BETTER READING than metformin. 3 iu when my blood sugar is
      about 105 and I have food in my stomach will lower my blood
      glucose to about 85 mg/dl in about one hour. Metformin would
      take it to 105...

      85 mg/dl is SIGNIFICANTLY BETTER in the long run than 105 mg/dl
      Blood sugar is at the root of all evil. It is food for cancer. And it
      causes blood to be sticky, and so it causes capillaries to get blocked.
      This causes strokes, heart attacks, macular degeneration, kidney
      problems, loss of neurons, senility, etc. etc. etc..

      If I did not take insulin, my blood sugar would not go below 105,
      unless I would do aerobic exercise, which I don't usually do.

      It is MUCH EASIER to inject a tiny dose of insulin than to do aerobic
      exercise 4 or 5 times per day. I simply would not do aerobic exercise
      more than one time per day... and I don't exercise every day. Injecting
      a small dose of insulin is very very easy, and I can do it anywhere,
      any time.

      Metformin prevents my blood sugar from going as high as it would
      have, but it doesn't lower my blood sugar any lower than it would
      have gone, which in me, is about 105 mg/dl... And it doesn't
      stop my pancreas from working. I DON'T WANT MY PANCREAS TO
      WORK, if I can take the load off of it.

      The MOST IMPORTANT REASON why I use insulin instead of
      metformin is BECAUSE I THINK IT IS GOOD FOR MY PANCREAS
      IN THE LONG RUN, NOT TO have to make insulin at times
      when I can take the load off of it.

      AS I SEE IT: My pancreas is like an air-conditioner that cannot be
      replaced. (note: today, the pancreas can be replaced by pancreas
      transplants... but let me suppose that I don't want to ever have to
      need a pancreas transplant...) If we are in Mars and we have an
      air-conditioner unit that cannot be replaced (that is, we can't
      run down to the store and throw away the old one and buy a new
      one...) then WE WOULD WANT THAT ONE AIR CONDITIONER UNIT
      TO NOT WEAR AWAY.

      That is how I see my pancreas. I don't want it to wear out. I want
      to KEEP MY PANCREAS well, until AFTER I AM DEAD (**).

      So I LIKE my pancreas NOT TO WORK (or to work less) when I inject
      insulin because I THINK this stretches out its useful lifespan. In the
      example of the air conditioner, it is better to open the windows and
      keep the room cool, than to turn on the air conditioner which will
      eventually run out.

      If I would be lost in a cave with a flashlight, I would do my best
      NOT to use the flashlight as much as I can, because I know the
      batteries will run out. I don't want my pancreas to come to the
      end of its useful life, and I THINK that I am stretching out its
      useful life by injecting insulin.

      Very roughly, I have injected perhaps 25,000 doses of insulin in
      10 years, at about 3 units per dose, call it 75,000 units of insulin
      that I have taken in 10 years, which my pancreas did not have to
      produce. I THINK that might have helped my pancreas to
      stay well... the fact is, I am still not a diabetic, and I hope I
      can stay non-diabetic for another 10 or 20 years.



      - Ellis


      (**) note: I am pretty sure that we all MUST DIE someday.

      In spite of the immortalists, and in spite of the fact that I try to do
      everything I can to slow down aging, I am convinced that I can only
      extend my healthy lifespan, perhaps many years...

      But I cannot prevent death from occuring some day. By the Law
      of Entropy, which briefly means: slowly everything goes wrong...
      everything flies to bits, at the atomic level, whether I like it, or not.

      Everything becomes more solid. I will be dead long before I am a rock....

      But MAYBE I can live 120 years in good health??? I would be very
      grateful "To God, and to Eli Lilly" (note: HGH... and insulin) if I can
      live 100 years in very good health and in a young and healthy body
      with healthy mind.

      Forget the "young"... just a healthy body, with a healthy mind... I will
      be very grateful for that, alone... - Ellis)


      On Mar 14, 2013, at 1:36 PM, ssskrc@... wrote:

      > SSSKRC: Hi Ellis,
      >
      > I notice on some of the bodybuilding sites, they use insulin to build
      > muscle.
      >
      > Do you use insulin in this way at all? If so what are your results?
      >
      > Ellis: Hello SSSKRC... No... I don't use insulin to build muscle. I only
      > take a dose of insulin when my blood sugar is higher than 100 mg/dl,
      > or before I am going to eat, to prevent blood sugar from going as high
      > as it would go otherwise.
      >
      > When I wake up in the morning, it is usual that my blood sugar is about
      > 103... 105 mg/dl... With a tiny dose of insulin I can get it down to
      > about 80, or 85 mg/dl. 85 is less than 105... I don't lack any energy
      > if blood glucose is 85. I don't feel any better or worse if it is 85
      > or if it is 105... I feel THE SAME... so I'll take 85 instead of 105.
      >
      > That is the ONLY reason why I use insulin.
      >
      > Insulin is so cheap (about $20 for 1000 iu... my usual dose is about
      > 3 iu...) that it is almost FREE... it DOESN'T HURT... there are NO SIDE
      > EFFECTS (after 25,000 doses, I should be able to say that I know there
      > are no bad side effects from taking a proper dose of insulin at the right
      > time...) and THEORETICALLY 85 mg/dl IS BETTER than 105 mg/dl...
      >
      > So why not get it down?
      >
      > In MY OPINION, based on 15 years using growth hormone, testosterone,
      > EPO, and insulin, the single most IMPORTANT hormone that I use to
      > slow down aging is insulin.
      >
      > If I would be stuck on a deserted island with only ONE anti-aging
      > hormone, without any doubt I would wish that it should be insulin.
      >
      > Growth hormone is fantastic, because "according to Ellis" it probably
      > does its magic by activating telomerase... but keeping blood glucose
      > controlled is more important that activating telomerase because it
      > helps to prevent damage to cells, thus it helps to prevent telomere
      > shortening.
      >
      > I am a BIG fanatic of keeping blood sugar controlled. It is the
      > single most important therapy I try to do every day, in my quest
      > to live a long and healthy life.
      >
      > Sugar is food for cancer cells, and it also rots the walls of veins and
      > arteries. But the worse thing blood sugar does is that it BLOCKS
      > CAPILLARIES.
      >
      > Sugar makes blood STICKY... and STICKY BLOOD causes whatever
      > is floating by in the blood to STICK to the sides of arteries and veins...
      > That is bad enough, but we can live with a partially blocked artery or
      > vein.
      >
      > But in tiny capillaries, it will stop up the capillaries completely, so blood
      > cannot cross through... Whatever is on the other end of that particular
      > capillary is going to suffer for lack of blood. If it happens to be muscle
      > or bone, it might be replaced and fixed... but if it is a NEURON, and if
      > that neuron DIES, then you have just lost a neuron forever.
      >
      > "According to Ellis" neurons have A MEMORY... and once that neuron is
      > GONE, that memory is ALSO GONE. Another neuron might take over the
      > job of the dead neuron, but it can't ever replace the memory. It has to
      > re-learn the job that the lost neuron did before... It might be the same,
      > but it might never be the same as before.
      >
      > (note: "according to Ellis" means this is something that I SAY, but I
      > have never read this anywhere else before... and it might not be
      > true... but it helps me to explain why something happens...
      >
      > In this case, it helps me to explain why we lose some fine functions
      > when we lose neurons, or why we never fully recover when whole
      > nerves are cut.
      >
      > It also helps to explain why there is a very strong correlation
      > between "diabetes" and "alzheimer's" and/or "senilty".)
      >
      > And since I can use insulin for "almost free" it certainly makes sense
      > TO ME that I should use it to prevent high blood sugar, which
      > might cause loss of neurons. WE KNOW that very very high blood
      > sugar causes diabetic neuropathy, so maybe not so high blood sugar
      > causes a little less loss, but a loss anyways. There is no acceptable
      > minimal amount of brain damage or loss of neurons that I am ready
      > to accept without putting up a fight.
      >
      > Using insulin probably also helps me to conserve muscle, but that's
      > not the reason why I use insulin... I use insulin ONLY because it helps
      > me to control blood sugar, even if I am not a diabetic.
      >
      > Thanks for writing. Good question.
      >
      > - Ellis Toussier
      > etoussier(at)safe-mail.net
      >

      y
    • Brent Biddle
      If you remember....Ellis.... a few weeks ago I discussed this at length... http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/Rejuvenation/message/10598 and in dark cold
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 18, 2013
        If you remember....Ellis.... a few weeks ago I discussed this at length...

        http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/Rejuvenation/message/10598

        and in dark cold recesses of the gym locker room you would get an
        "amen" from most professional body builders....

        it is insulin in combination with the steroid stacks that have turned
        the men of Arnold's day into the cartoon supermen you see on the
        magazine covers of today..

        Hard work... diet... steroids... and INSULIN are the 4 horsemen of
        the gods of the gym today....

        And as I noted... death has and does occur to those that are not
        careful on the insulin manipulation...

        using insulin is not to be attempted alone, or without the proper
        education.....

        Ego has no place in the chemical jungle.....

        Brent


        Ellis: Hello again, Brent...

        I AGREE with you that Death has and does occur to those that are
        not careful on the insulin manipulation.

        I am not in favor of death, by insulin.

        THAT IS WHY I NEVER (... hardly ever... except when I am purposely
        experimenting) EXCEED A DOSE OF 5 iu. in one occasion. (that
        means: in a space of about 4 hours)

        BODYBUILDERS greatly exceed a dose of 5 iu.

        Then they WISH they are "balancing" it with a plate of spaghetti, etc.

        THAT IS A BIG MISTAKE, in my opinion.

        I try to set the example to say that I DO NOT use insulin to build
        musle... and I DO NOT TAKE MORE THAN 5 iu together...

        That means: 3 iu before a meal, and perhaps 1 or 2 iu after a meal if I
        ate in such a manner that my blood glucose is above 100 mg/dl...

        If body builders would continue with "hard work... diet... steroids...
        and maximum 5 iu insulin" AND ALSO if they would MEASURE THEIR
        BLOOD GLUCOSE and ALWAYS EAT, I am pretty sure there would
        not be any more deaths from using insulin.

        For example... I refer to "MUTANT'S INSULIN PROTOCOL"

        This page is written by a bodybuilder who writes well about protein,
        but in my opinion, he doesn't know what he writes when he writes about
        insulin. See his page here:

        http://www.basskilleronline.com/beginner-insulin-guide.shtml

        He does not say anywhere that you should check your blood glucose
        levels with a glucose meter, when I say that this is ABSOLUTELY ESSENTIAL....

        And his formula for what to do in case of hypoglycemia is the same baloney
        everybody else repeats after reading what everybody else wrote (except
        "according to Ellis") ie, cover it with carbohydrates.

        His page on protein, however, is excellent.

        That is typical. Bodybuilders know how to eat, and they know how to
        exercise to build muscles... But they only THINK they know how to use
        insulin.

        But "according to Ellis" THEY DON'T USE INSULIN CORRECTLY.

        THEY OVERDOSE. THAT IS WHY A FEW BODY BUILDERS DIE...

        I PASTE THIS from MUTANT'S INSULIN PROTOCOL, WITH MY COMMENTS
        IN CAPITALS:

        What, When, and How?

        For the purpose of bodybuilding, we want to use a short acting insulin
        (such as Humalog, or if not available next best Humulin-R). Either of these
        should be very inexpensive to purchase (under $40). The dose required will
        end up being between 4-10 IU's, and even in the most advanced users
        under 15 IU's should get the job done.

        Ellis: CRAZY, MAN... CRAZY... 15 IU OF HUMULIN R OR OF HUMALOG IS ENOUGH
        TO KILL A HORSE...

        For beginners, stay in the 8-10 IU range.

        Ellis: I HAVE TAKEN 10 IU, AND I DID NOT EAT (ON PURPOSE) AND MY BLOOD
        SUGAR DROPPED LIKE A TON OF LEAD.

        BUT I WAS MEASURING MY BLOOD SUGAR WITH A GLUCOSE METER
        EVERY 3 MINUTES, SO THERE WAS NO PROBLEM.

        BUT IF I HAD TAKEN 15 IU AND NOT EATEN, PERHAPS I WOULD HAVE
        HAD A PROBLEM, UNLESS I WAS MEASURING BLOOD SUGAR EVERY
        3 MINUTES, AS I WAS DOING BECAUSE I WANTED TO AVOID DYING...

        I KNOW MUTANT's ADVICE ABOVE CAN BE DANGEROUS, TO ANYBODY
        WHO IS NOT AWARE HOW FAST BLOOD SUGAR CAN DROP WITH AN
        OVERDOSE OF INSULIN, AND WHO IS NOT CHECKING HIS BLOOD SUGAR
        WITH A GLUCOSE METER, AND WHO FORGETS TO EAT.

        The most advantageous time to use this is immediately post workout,
        when our muscles are screaming out for nutrients and are in a catabolic
        state. We use a U-100 insulin syringe with 1/2" needle to inject IM
        immediately post workout.

        Ellis: IF I WAS A BODYBUILDER AND IF SOMEBODY ASKED ME FOR ADVICE ON
        HOW TO USE INSULIN TO BUILD MUSCLES, I WOULD RECOMMEND: INJECT
        3 iu (AND EAT SOMETHING... PREFERABLY PROTEIN) BEFORE THE
        WORKOUT.

        CHECK YOUR BLOOD SUGAR WITH A GLUCOSE METER.

        DO YOUR WORKOUT.

        CHECK YOUR BLOOD SUGAR AGAIN WITH A GLUCOSE METER.

        IT TAKES ABOUT AN HOUR FOR INJECTED INSULIN TO GET INTO THE BLOOD
        AND BLOOD GLUCOSE STARTS DROPPING SLOWLY, IF YOU ONLY INJECTED
        3 IU. (... subcutaneously, into fat.)

        Alternatively, you can inject sub-q if desired.

        Ellis: ALTERNATIVELY ??? WHICH OTHER WAY? ARE THEY INJECTING
        INTRA-MUSCULAR, or INTRA-VENOUS?!!!

        WOW! THAT SPEEDS UP AND MAKES MORE POTENT THEIR DOSE OF
        INSULIN, BECAUSE IT GOES INTO THE BLOOD MUCH FASTER !

        When starting out using insulin, begin with a dose of 2 IU's or so, and
        increase the dose each workout day until you reach your desired maximum.

        HE DOESN'T KNOW HOW TO USE INSULIN: HOW DO YOU FIND YOUR
        "DESIRED MAXIMUM"...???

        WHAT IF YOU DIE FIRST... AND THEN YOU WANT TO DROP YOUR DOSE
        TO A BIT LESS ? HOW WOULD YOU DO THAT ?

        Immediately following your injection, you will want to do the following
        religiously:

        injection + 5 minutes: drink shake with 10g glutamine / 10g creatine
        / 55g dextrose (based on 7-8 IU's - 7-8 grams per IU more precisely)

        Injection + 15 minutes: drink shake with 80g of whey protein in water

        Injection + 60 - 75 minutes: eat a protein / carb meal with 40-50g of
        protein, 40-50g of carbs, NO FATS

        Avoid fats for 2-3 hours for Humalog IM, 3-4 hours for Humalog sub-q,
        4-5 hours for Humulin-R.


        NOTICE THE MISTAKEN IDEA THAT A HUGE AMOUNT OF SUGAR IS WHAT
        IS NEEDED TO PREVENT HYPOGLYCEMIA: 55 G DEXTROSE, 40-50 G CARBS.

        ANY FOOD THAT GIVES CALORIES QUICKLY CAN BE USED...THAT CAN BE A
        VERY SMALL GLASS OF FRUIT JUICE... EVEN PROTEIN CAN STOP THE DROP
        OF BLOOD SUGAR. I HAVE TESTED WITH ONE HARD-BOILED EGG YOLK,
        AND IT WORKS FINE.

        THE PROBLEM IS: EVEN AFTER YOU EAT, YOU STILL FEEL HYPOGLYCEMIA,
        SO YOU THINK YOU NEED TO EAT MORE BECAUSE YOU STILL FEEL
        HYPOGLYCEMIC, (AND IT DOESN'T FEEL VERY GOOD, AT ALL...)

        SO YOU EAT MORE AND MORE, AND YOU END THE HYPOGLYCEMIA BUT
        YOU MIGHT SWING OVER TO HYPERGLYCEMIA (WHICH TO ME WOULD BE
        ANYTHING 120 MG/DL AND HIGHER.

        Things to Watch for

        Insulin's most commons side effect is HYPOGLYCEMIA (low blood glucose).
        It is important that you know the signs of hypoglycemia because they may
        occur quickly!

        They are:
        - Shakiness
        - Anxiety
        - Fast heart beat
        - Hunger
        - Sweating
        - Blurred vision
        - Dizziness
        - Weakness
        - Headache
        - Irritability

        If any of these symptoms occur, you should eat some form of quick acting
        sugar to prevent the symptoms from getting worse (e.g., two or three
        glucose tablets, one tube of glucose gel, one-half cup of fruit juice or r
        egular soft drink, one tablespoon of honey, or one tablespoon of sugar
        dissolved in water)

        Always have something like the above on hand when using insulin.
        Hypo symptoms can and will hit hard and fast, and you will have a very
        small window of time to react. Be ready!!

        IF THEY HAD NOT OVERDOSED ON INSULIN, THEY WOULD NOT BE GETTING HYPOGLYCEMIA...

        AS HE SAYS "HYPO SYMPTOMS CAN AND WILL HIT HARD AND FAST, AND
        YOU WILL HAVE A VERY SMALL WINDOW OF TIME TO REACT."

        IF YOU DID NOT OVERDOSE ON INSULIN, YOU WILL HAVE A VERY LONG
        WINDOW OF TIME TO REACT, EVEN IF YOU FORGOT TO EAT, AS HE
        RECOMMENDED YOU SHOULD EAT AFTER TAKING A DOSE OF INSULIN.

        PEOPLE DIE, BECAUSE THEY MAKE MISTAKES.

        I SAY THE CORRECT DOSE OF INSULIN FOR ME IS A DOSE THAT WILL NOT
        KILL ME, EVEN IF I FORGET TO EAT.

        THE MAXIMUM DOSE I WILL USUALLY TAKE (EXCEPT WHEN I AM EXPERIMENTING
        AND WRITING FOR "REJUVENATION"...) IS 5 IU.

        AND I USUALLY TAKE 3 IU AND THEN 2 IU IF I THINK AFTER THE FACTS THAT
        ANOTHER 2 IU CAN BE USEFUL.

        HIS PAGE ON USING INSULIN IS FULL OF ERROR, IN MY OPINION, BUT... HIS PAGE
        ON PROTEIN IS VERY WELL WRITTEN AND I AGREE WITH HIS CONCLUSIONS.


        - ELLIS


        --- On Thu, 3/14/13, ssskrc@... <ssskrc@...> wrote:

        From: ssskrc@... <ssskrc@...>
        Subject: [Rejuvenation] * * * Do you (Ellis) use Insulin to build muscle?
        To: Rejuvenation@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, March 14, 2013, 1:36 PM

        SSSKRC: Hi Ellis,

        I notice on some of the bodybuilding sites, they use insulin to build

        muscle.

        Do you use insulin in this way at all? If so what are your results?

        Ellis: Hello SSSKRC... No... I don't use insulin to build muscle. I only
        take a dose of insulin when my blood sugar is higher than 100 mg/dl,
        or before I am going to eat, to prevent blood sugar from going as high
        as it would go otherwise.

        When I wake up in the morning, it is usual that my blood sugar is about
        103... 105 mg/dl... With a tiny dose of insulin I can get it down to
        about 80, or 85 mg/dl. 85 is less than 105... I don't lack any energy
        if blood glucose is 85. I don't feel any better or worse if it is 85
        or if it is 105... I feel THE SAME... so I'll take 85 instead of 105.

        That is the ONLY reason why I use insulin.

        Insulin is so cheap (about $20 for 1000 iu... my usual dose is about
        3 iu...) that it is almost FREE... it DOESN'T HURT... there are NO SIDE
        EFFECTS (after 25,000 doses, I should be able to say that I know there
        are no bad side effects from taking a proper dose of insulin at the right
        time...) and THEORETICALLY 85 mg/dl IS BETTER than 105 mg/dl...

        So why not get it down?

        In MY OPINION, based on 15 years using growth hormone, testosterone,
        EPO, and insulin, the single most IMPORTANT hormone that I use to
        slow down aging is insulin.

        If I would be stuck on a deserted island with only ONE anti-aging
        hormone, without any doubt I would wish that it should be insulin.

        Growth hormone is fantastic, because "according to Ellis" it probably
        does its magic by activating telomerase... but keeping blood glucose
        controlled is more important that activating telomerase because it
        helps to prevent damage to cells, thus it helps to prevent telomere
        shortening.

        I am a BIG fanatic of keeping blood sugar controlled. It is the
        single most important therapy I try to do every day, in my quest
        to live a long and healthy life.

        Sugar is food for cancer cells, and it also rots the walls of veins and
        arteries. But the worse thing blood sugar does is that it BLOCKS
        CAPILLARIES.

        Sugar makes blood STICKY... and STICKY BLOOD causes whatever
        is floating by in the blood to STICK to the sides of arteries and veins...

        That is bad enough, but we can live with a partially blocked artery or
        vein.

        But in tiny capillaries, it will stop up the capillaries completely, so blood
        cannot cross through... Whatever is on the other end of that particular
        capillary is going to suffer for lack of blood. If it happens to be muscle
        or bone, it might be replaced and fixed... but if it is a NEURON, and if
        that neuron DIES, then you have just lost a neuron forever.

        "According to Ellis" neurons have A MEMORY... and once that neuron is
        GONE, that memory is ALSO GONE. Another neuron might take over the
        job of the dead neuron, but it can't ever replace the memory. It has to
        re-learn the job that the lost neuron did before... It might be the same,
        but it might never be the same as before.

        (note: "according to Ellis" means this is something that I SAY, but I
        have never read this anywhere else before... and it might not be
        true... but it helps me to explain why something happens...

        In this case, it helps me to explain why we lose some fine functions
        when we lose neurons, or why we never fully recover when whole
        nerves are cut.

        It also helps to explain why there is a very strong correlation
        between "diabetes" and "alzheimer's" and/or "senilty".)

        And since I can use insulin for "almost free" it certainly makes sense
        TO ME that I should use it to prevent high blood sugar, which
        might cause loss of neurons. WE KNOW that very very high blood
        sugar causes diabetic neuropathy, so maybe not so high blood sugar
        causes a little less loss, but a loss anyways. There is no acceptable
        minimal amount of brain damage or loss of neurons that I am ready
        to accept without putting up a fight.

        Using insulin probably also helps me to conserve muscle, but that's
        not the reason why I use insulin... I use insulin ONLY because it helps
        me to control blood sugar, even if I am not a diabetic.

        Thanks for writing. Good question.

        - Ellis Toussier
        etoussier(at)safe-mail.net
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