Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

* * * Experiment No. 1: Blood Glucose and Aerobic Exercise

Expand Messages
  • Ellis2ca
    Today I will begin a series of experiments which I hope will TEACH everybody something. I didn t expect to do this, so I didn t weigh what I ate. About 9:00
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 4, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Today I will begin a series of experiments which I hope will TEACH everybody
      something. I didn't expect to do this, so I didn't weigh what I ate.

      About 9:00 A.M. I had a breakfast of 2 eggs, with a slice of melted cheese,
      fried in butter.

      I also had one half glass (about 100 cc) watered-down grapefruit juice
      (1 part pure grapefruit juice, 2 parts water...) whenever I felt thirsty.

      Then... about noon, I ate chocolate ice cream... too much chocolate
      ice cream. Chocolate ice cream is my poison. It is my Achilles' Heal.

      I checked my blood sugar at 13:38 (1:38 PM) and it came out 123 mg/dl
      which is "BAD" "according to Ellis". (note: I use a Roche AccuCheck Activa.)

      I can bring blood glucose down with 3 to 5 iu Humulin R, or I can bring
      it down with aerobic exercise. The Lazy Man in me usually injects insulin...

      But today I thought I would bring it down with aerobic exercise.

      I am lucky that there is a gymnasium in the building where I live, and there
      is a "Star Trac" elliptical trainer that I like very much because it does not
      hurt my knees to do aerobic exercise.

      I have done this many times before, so I know that aerobic exercise is the
      correct type of exercise to bring down blood sugar, because it brings it down
      much more and much faster than resistance exercise.

      Usually, I do 20 minutes or 30 minutes, and then I check my blood sugar.
      I guessed by past experience that my blood sugar would be near 80 mg/dl.
      after 20 minutes.

      But this time, I decided I would report it to Rejuvenation, so I decided to
      check blood sugar after 5, 10, 15 and 20 minutes.

      I got on a Star Trac elliptical trainer and I did FIVE MINUTES of exercise.

      Then I checked my blood sugar, and then I did five more minutes exercise... etc.

      The time shown below is the time on the blood glucose meter, and it reflects
      the time I took the tests... 11 minutes apart means it took me 6 minutes not
      on the trainer, and 5 minutes on the trainer.

      I set the level of the trainer at "14" out of 20, which means it was "tight" but
      not "very tight"... In 5 minutes my heart rate was about 150 beats per minute.

      After 5 minutes, the machine said I burned 75 calories, which is at the rate of
      15 calories per minute (according to the machine.)

      In each of the subsequent tests, I was on the trainer FIVE MINUTES and I burned
      about 75 calories in 5 minutes. Level of duress was always set to "14".

      Time Blood Glucose
      0. 13:38 123 mg/dl

      1. 13:49 93 mg/dl

      AMAZING: IN FIVE MINUTES of aerobic exercise, my blood glucose dropped
      from 123 to 93!!! That is DOWN 30 points in FIVE MINUTES !

      This means YOU should all take note that it is fairly easy to bring down
      blood sugar with a little bit of aerobic exercise. If you can run, then run.

      But if you are not ready to run, you can always find a place to WALK FAST...
      or WALK UP a few flights of stairs, and you will bring down blood sugar.

      If you want to KNOW what happens, you have to MEASURE IT. You will
      be more motivated if you CHECK YOUR BLOOD SUGAR and see the drop.

      (note: if you are a diabetic, this MIGHT NOT make blood sugar drop.)

      I decided to do another 5 minutes on the elliptical trainer. The 9 minutes
      between tests is resting time and FIVE MINUTES on the trainer.

      2. 13:58 87 mg/dl Down 6 points in 5 minutes.

      Down only 6 points. 30 points in 5 minutes, 6 points in the next 5 minutes.

      3. 14:09 77 mg/dl Down 10 points in 5 minutes.

      4. 14: 21 65 mg/dl Down 12 points in 5 minutes.

      With this, I have done 4 sets of 5 minutes each, for a total of 20 minutes, and
      I am surprised to see that my blood sugar is down to 65 mg/dl... much more
      than I expected.

      Why? I can't explain why, or how... but I can guess... And I can tell you
      with certainty: this is what happened.

      Now I am curious to see how much more it will drop with another 5 minutes
      of exercise, so I get on the elliptical trainer again and I did another
      5 minutes of exercise.

      5. 14:32 63 mg/dl Down 2 points in 5 minutes.

      Hmmm... only 2 points down... resistance... I'll try another 5 minutes.

      6. 14:42 64 mg/dl Up 1 point in 5 minutes. Essentially THE SAME.
      Blood sugar seems to have reached a point where there is resistance to
      drop further.

      Another 5 minutes:

      7. 14:58 63 mg/dl Again, essentially THE SAME.

      This makes 15 minutes of the SAME EXERCISE that brought down blood
      sugar from 123 to 77, but this time NO DROP from 65 mg/dl, after 3 sets
      of 5 minutes.

      I was thirsty so I drank ONE GLASS of watered down grapefruit juice
      (1 part grapefruit, 2 parts water.) I only drink watered down fruit juices.

      I did another 5 minutes exercise.

      8. 15: 16 75 mg/dl

      There is an 18 minute difference between the time I tested before until
      this past test, which means I rested about 10 minutes (I drank
      watered-down grapefruit juice.)

      Another 5 minutes on the elliptical trainer:

      9. 15:25 69 mg/dl

      Blood glucose came down 6 points.

      10. 15:36 78 mg/dl

      Blood glucose went back up... The carbs at work ??? Another 5 minutes
      exercise:

      11. 15:50 67 mg/dl

      Good... Back down to 67... Another 5 minutes, and I expect it will not drop
      very much, or it might go up a bit, or stay about the same...

      12. 16:02 65 mg/dl

      By the end of 12 sets of 5 minutes of exercise on the elliptical trainer, my
      heart was beating about 160 beats per minute. At no time did I feel "dizzy"
      or "weak".

      I had no symptoms of hypo-glycemia. I was tired, as expected, but I could
      have continued to do more sets of 5 minutes exercise.

      Although I have referred to anything below 70 mg/dl as "mild hypo-glycemia"
      I feel 65 is not really hypo-glycemia. Not even 60...

      If I don't have the symptoms of hypo-glycemia, then it isn't hypo-glycemia.

      I had none of the symptoms of hypo-glycemia.

      It is amazing to compare the drop in blood glucose that occured in the
      FIRST FIVE MINUTES of aerobic exercise with the lack of drop of blood
      glucose after I reach the threshold of about 65 mg/dl.

      Something in my body kicks in to RESIST hypo-glycemia. TO DROP
      blood glucose after 4 sets of five minutes aerobic exercise.

      My body resists dropping blood glucose below (aprox) 65 mg/dl, which I
      THINK means I am BURNING FAT or BURNING PROTEIN.

      The glass of watered down grapefruit juice added perhaps 10 grams of
      carbs. (100 cc. of Grapefruit juice contains about 12 grams of carbs... a
      whole glass of pure grapefruit juice is about 30 grams of carbs.

      My watered down one-whole-glass of grapefruit juice is only 10 grams of
      carbs.

      Lesson learned: I can drop blood glucose much faster with aerobic exercise
      than with fast-acting-short-duration Humulin "R" (identical in structure to
      human insulin) which is the insulin I usually use.

      Several sets of 5 minutes of aerobic exercise, followed by 5 minutes of
      rest, drops blood sugar MORE THAN the same amount of time doing aerobic
      exercise without any rest in between. And I can DO it, without being
      exhausted at the end.

      I did 12 sets of 5 minutes without any problem getting tired or exhausted.

      I have done 60 minutes of aerobic exercise without rest in the past, and
      this time it was MUCH EASIER to do. I would have been much more tired
      if I had done 60 minutes aerobic exercise straight, without any rest...

      And it would have dropped blood sugar to about the same 65 mg/dl.

      EASIER TO DO, WITH SAME RESULT, IS BETTER THAN: DIFFICULT TO DO.

      I intend to repeat these tests on an empty stomach, and with a high carb
      breakfast... and maybe other variations.

      Stay tuned. If anybody has checked their blood glucose after aerobic
      exercise, please tell us your experience. If anybody can repeat my
      test, please tell us your experience.

      NOTE: My experience is COMPLETELY DIFFERENT than what is reported by
      these persons who are DIABETICS. Their blood sugar goes UP after
      aerobic or anaerobic exercise.

      http://www.diabetesdaily.com/forum/exercise/26437-cardio-high-glucose

      Why do I think their blood sugar goes UP with exercise instead of DOWN?
      For the same reason that my blood sugar does not go DOWN any more
      when I reach 65 mg/dl.

      I think my LIVER releases glucose and keeps it from going DOWN. In a
      diabetic, the LIVER ALSO releases glucose but then the diabetic does not
      have the help of the pancreas to keep it in check.

      I think of it like an elevator that has a force going DOWN (insulin) and brakes
      going UP to slow the fall (glucose)... The diabetic only has the force
      going UP, he does not have the force going DOWN so his blood sugar
      shoots up with nothing to bring it DOWN or steady it out.

      That is only "according to Ellis"... Take it or leave it... but it is an explanation
      of why I think these diabetics say their blood sugar goes UP when they do
      exercise.

      Advice from endocrinologists, as usual, is not what I would have told this
      person: "I would love for peoples' advice on how to help even out my high
      blood sugar levels after intense exercise.

      My endocrinologist can't give me any advice on this--the only thing she
      tells me is to make sure to eat 1-2 carbs before exercising..."

      She wouldn't listen to what I have to say, anyways... but if this person ever
      reads this post, my advice is to EAT LOW CARB, and PROTEIN, AND FAT.

      Notice, also, that MY CRITERIA is totally different than these persons below,
      who are diabetic. Many of these report similar results as I did above. But I
      would not be AFRAID of a drop of 60 to 80 points... I think it is a REASON
      TO BE HAPPY and CHEER and DO IT AGAIN.

      http://www.diabetesdaily.com/forum/exercise/40438-compensating-blood-glucose-drop-during-aerobic-exercise

      I think blood glucose 65 is great... they think 65 is something to fear.

      I think that carbs are BAD to avoid hypo-glycemia, and they have been
      taught to believe that carbs are GOOD to avoid hypo-glycemia.

      - Ellis Toussier


      = = = = =

      (note: I am 67 years old, 5' 11" tall, 160 lbs., HbA1c about 5.2, Body Mass
      Index about 19, in excellent health, and I am not a diabetic.

      I try to eat low carb, high protein, no special attempt to avoid or to take
      more fat. I focus on vegetables and animal origin (eggs, chicken, fish,
      yoghurt, cheese) and I avoid bread, potatoes, spaghetti, cakes, candies, etc.

      Chocolate ice cream is my poison

      I have used a correct dose of insulin at the appropriate time since 2002,
      to help control blood sugar.

      That is, more than 20,000 doses of insulin in 11 years.

      I have had no bad side effects from using a correct dose of insulin at the
      right time, and I have not become diabetic, and I have not developed insulin
      resistance, and I have not had brain damage (I think...) and I am not insulin
      dependent, etc.

      EVERYTHING THAT DOCTORS THOUGHT WOULD HAPPEN TO ME for using
      insulin, DID NOT HAPPEN. I am not criticizing doctors. They learned this
      from their schools and their books, and they taught it to other doctors and
      practice it with their patients.

      Nobody dared to prove that they are mistaken.

      An overdose of Insulin can kill... but the right dose of insulin, I found out,
      is very good to control blood sugar...

      I, myself, tried insulin the first time expecting that I might become insulin
      dependent. But I didn't think that would be such a bad thing to happen, if it
      would happen, since I had read that well controlled insulin dependent diabetics
      live LONGER than non-diabetics.

      As I say tongue-in-cheeck:

      "Why should only Diabetics have all the fun?"

      If doctors said it would happen to me, it was sure to be on the list of what
      did NOT happen to me.)

      - Ellis Toussier
    • C.Marley
      C. Marley: Exercise LOWERS blood sugar in type 2 diabetics. Your muscles eat sugar. It is as simple as that! - cm Ellis: Hello Dr. Marley. With all due
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 5, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        C. Marley: Exercise LOWERS blood sugar in type 2 diabetics.

        Your muscles eat sugar. It is as simple as that! - cm

        Ellis: Hello Dr. Marley.

        With all due respect: I think you have not READ all my post, because
        if you had, you would see that IT IS NOT "AS SIMPLE AS THAT! "

        This is what I THINK IS INTERESTING about my own experience, which
        I find to be not "AS SIMPLE AS THAT"

        1. Blood sugar dropped 30 points in the first five minutes, from
        123 mg/dl to 93 mg/dl.

        This is MUCH FASTER than USING "FAST-ACTING" INSULIN. It takes
        about 60 minutes to drop blood sugar 30 points, using Humulin R.

        AND it is IN CONTRAST to what happened after my blood sugar got to
        65, after 4 sets of 5 minutes. After this, the next EIGHT SETS of
        5 minutes, MY BLOOD SUGAR DID NOT DROP ANY LOWER THAN 63.

        That is not "simple"... It is uneven.

        There has to be an explanation, and you are a doctor. I would like to
        hear YOUR explanation.

        One explanation MIGHT BE that blood sugar floating about from CARBS
        burns up very fast, and blood sugar from protein and/or fat burns up
        more slowly.

        That is a pretty good explanation "according to Ellis" but it might be
        mistaken... and there might be other explanations.

        2. I was able to do 12 sets of 5 minutes of aerobic exercise without being
        exhausted at the end of it. That is SIXTY MINUTES of aerobic exercise,
        without being exhausted. I think THAT is PRETTY COOL.

        I am going to REVISE MY BOOK "HOW SHORT KIDS CAN GROW TALLER
        WITHOUT INJECTABLE GROWTH HORMONE" because this is a great way
        to lower blood sugar below 70, and I am going to recommend it.

        But I am not through experimenting yet, because I have to see what
        happens if I have a HIGH CARB supper and breakfast, and I have to see
        what happens if I have NO BREAKFAST, etc. I THINK the results might
        be different.

        I THINK that blood sugar might drop BELOW 60 in both cases... we'll see.

        Of course it will go UP after I drink carbs, as endurance athletes do
        during an endurance event.

        But what will happen if I drink PROTEIN and FAT?

        I dunno. I have to find out.

        3. As I wrote in my post, "My experience is COMPLETELY DIFFERENT
        than what is reported by these persons who are DIABETICS."

        I will copy and paste what some of them wrote on this page which I think
        you didn't read, so you will see that their blood sugar goes UP after aerobic
        or anaerobic exercise. Please read it all, and you will see that it is not
        "as simple as that"... Blood glucose might go UP after doing exercise.

        http://www.diabetesdaily.com/forum/exercise/26437-cardio-high-glucose

        ==== Jeannie:
        Does anyone else have the problem with glusose levels rising after
        intense exercise. I know I have to exercise to keep weight down but
        if I exercise for 2 hours or more my numbers go up instead of down.

        Also if I do weight lifting at night it seems my numbers the next
        morning are higher.

        ===== Steph replied:

        your highs are related your body's "stress" response to the exercise.
        When you workout for prolonged periods of time, your body releases
        a stress hormone called cortisol. This hormone causes an increase
        in blood glucose, sometimes lasting even to the next day.

        ===== BSC replied:

        Everyone will react differently to exercise. Many find that light exercise
        such as walking will smoothly reduce their blood sugar.

        On the other hand, intense anaerobic activity will raise your levels.
        Stress and cortisol can be on cause....

        I know myself, I lift weights and my blood sugar will rise more than
        100 mg/dl. It will remain elevated for some time, but after a few hours
        it will return to my normal fasting levels.

        ====== A Type I diabetic answers:

        I've experienced high blood sugars after intense running. This past
        weekend was my first road race (10K) since I discovered that I had
        type I diabetes in October 2010, and my blood gluocose was 135
        before the race, and afterward it shot up to 428.

        ====== Jeannie answers:
        Mine never went above 200...

        =======SheRa answers:
        I used to get up at 4:30 in the morning so I could be to the gym by 5am.
        I worked out from 5 till 7:30 constant, cardio, then weights, then cardio
        again. It was a heavy duty work out.

        Blood Glucose going in would be normal, Blood Glucose coming out
        would be 200-300.

        =====

        - Ellis Toussier

        On 3/4/2013 5:53 AM, Ellis2ca wrote:
        > Today I will begin a series of experiments which I hope will TEACH everybody
        > something. I didn't expect to do this, so I didn't weigh what I ate.
        >
        > About 9:00 A.M. I had a breakfast of 2 eggs, with a slice of melted cheese,
        > fried in butter.
        >
        > I also had one half glass (about 100 cc) watered-down grapefruit juice
        > (1 part pure grapefruit juice, 2 parts water...) whenever I felt thirsty.
        >
        > Then... about noon, I ate chocolate ice cream... too much chocolate
        > ice cream. Chocolate ice cream is my poison. It is my Achilles' Heal.
        >
        > I checked my blood sugar at 13:38 (1:38 PM) and it came out 123 mg/dl
        > which is "BAD" "according to Ellis". (note: I use a Roche AccuCheck Activa.)
        >
        > I can bring blood glucose down with 3 to 5 iu Humulin R, or I can bring
        > it down with aerobic exercise. The Lazy Man in me usually injects insulin...
        >
        > But today I thought I would bring it down with aerobic exercise.
        >
        > I am lucky that there is a gymnasium in the building where I live, and there
        > is a "Star Trac" elliptical trainer that I like very much because it does not
        > hurt my knees to do aerobic exercise.
        >
        > I have done this many times before, so I know that aerobic exercise is the
        > correct type of exercise to bring down blood sugar, because it brings it down
        > much more and much faster than resistance exercise.
        >
        > Usually, I do 20 minutes or 30 minutes, and then I check my blood sugar.
        > I guessed by past experience that my blood sugar would be near 80 mg/dl.
        > after 20 minutes.
        >
        > But this time, I decided I would report it to Rejuvenation, so I decided to
        > check blood sugar after 5, 10, 15 and 20 minutes.
        >
        > I got on a Star Trac elliptical trainer and I did FIVE MINUTES of exercise.
        >
        > Then I checked my blood sugar, and then I did five more minutes exercise... etc.
        >
        > The time shown below is the time on the blood glucose meter, and it reflects
        > the time I took the tests... 11 minutes apart means it took me 6 minutes not
        > on the trainer, and 5 minutes on the trainer.
        >
        > I set the level of the trainer at "14" out of 20, which means it was "tight" but
        > not "very tight"... In 5 minutes my heart rate was about 150 beats per minute.
        >
        > After 5 minutes, the machine said I burned 75 calories, which is at the rate of
        > 15 calories per minute (according to the machine.)
        >
        > In each of the subsequent tests, I was on the trainer FIVE MINUTES and I burned
        > about 75 calories in 5 minutes. Level of duress was always set to "14".
        >
        > Time Blood Glucose
        > 0. 13:38 123 mg/dl
        >
        > 1. 13:49 93 mg/dl
        >
        > AMAZING: IN FIVE MINUTES of aerobic exercise, my blood glucose dropped
        > from 123 to 93!!! That is DOWN 30 points in FIVE MINUTES !
        >
        > This means YOU should all take note that it is fairly easy to bring down
        > blood sugar with a little bit of aerobic exercise. If you can run, then run.
        >
        > But if you are not ready to run, you can always find a place to WALK FAST...
        > or WALK UP a few flights of stairs, and you will bring down blood sugar.
        >
        > If you want to KNOW what happens, you have to MEASURE IT. You will
        > be more motivated if you CHECK YOUR BLOOD SUGAR and see the drop.
        >
        > (note: if you are a diabetic, this MIGHT NOT make blood sugar drop.)
        >
        > I decided to do another 5 minutes on the elliptical trainer. The 9 minutes
        > between tests is resting time and FIVE MINUTES on the trainer.
        >
        > 2. 13:58 87 mg/dl Down 6 points in 5 minutes.
        >
        > Down only 6 points. 30 points in 5 minutes, 6 points in the next 5 minutes.
        >
        > 3. 14:09 77 mg/dl Down 10 points in 5 minutes.
        >
        > 4. 14: 21 65 mg/dl Down 12 points in 5 minutes.
        >
        > With this, I have done 4 sets of 5 minutes each, for a total of 20 minutes, and
        > I am surprised to see that my blood sugar is down to 65 mg/dl... much more
        > than I expected.
        >
        > Why? I can't explain why, or how... but I can guess... And I can tell you
        > with certainty: this is what happened.
        >
        > Now I am curious to see how much more it will drop with another 5 minutes
        > of exercise, so I get on the elliptical trainer again and I did another
        > 5 minutes of exercise.
        >
        > 5. 14:32 63 mg/dl Down 2 points in 5 minutes.
        >
        > Hmmm... only 2 points down... resistance... I'll try another 5 minutes.
        >
        > 6. 14:42 64 mg/dl Up 1 point in 5 minutes. Essentially THE SAME.
        > Blood sugar seems to have reached a point where there is resistance to
        > drop further.
        >
        > Another 5 minutes:
        >
        > 7. 14:58 63 mg/dl Again, essentially THE SAME.
        >
        > This makes 15 minutes of the SAME EXERCISE that brought down blood
        > sugar from 123 to 77, but this time NO DROP from 65 mg/dl, after 3 sets
        > of 5 minutes.
        >
        > I was thirsty so I drank ONE GLASS of watered down grapefruit juice
        > (1 part grapefruit, 2 parts water.) I only drink watered down fruit juices.
        >
        > I did another 5 minutes exercise.
        >
        > 8. 15: 16 75 mg/dl
        >
        > There is an 18 minute difference between the time I tested before until
        > this past test, which means I rested about 10 minutes (I drank
        > watered-down grapefruit juice.)
        >
        > Another 5 minutes on the elliptical trainer:
        >
        > 9. 15:25 69 mg/dl
        >
        > Blood glucose came down 6 points.
        >
        > 10. 15:36 78 mg/dl
        >
        > Blood glucose went back up... The carbs at work ??? Another 5 minutes
        > exercise:
        >
        > 11. 15:50 67 mg/dl
        >
        > Good... Back down to 67... Another 5 minutes, and I expect it will not drop
        > very much, or it might go up a bit, or stay about the same...
        >
        > 12. 16:02 65 mg/dl
        >
        > By the end of 12 sets of 5 minutes of exercise on the elliptical trainer, my
        > heart was beating about 160 beats per minute. At no time did I feel "dizzy"
        > or "weak".
        >
        > I had no symptoms of hypo-glycemia. I was tired, as expected, but I could
        > have continued to do more sets of 5 minutes exercise.
        >
        > Although I have referred to anything below 70 mg/dl as "mild hypo-glycemia"
        > I feel 65 is not really hypo-glycemia. Not even 60...
        >
        > If I don't have the symptoms of hypo-glycemia, then it isn't hypo-glycemia.
        >
        > I had none of the symptoms of hypo-glycemia.
        >
        > It is amazing to compare the drop in blood glucose that occured in the
        > FIRST FIVE MINUTES of aerobic exercise with the lack of drop of blood
        > glucose after I reach the threshold of about 65 mg/dl.
        >
        > Something in my body kicks in to RESIST hypo-glycemia. TO DROP
        > blood glucose after 4 sets of five minutes aerobic exercise.
        >
        > My body resists dropping blood glucose below (aprox) 65 mg/dl, which I
        > THINK means I am BURNING FAT or BURNING PROTEIN.
        >
        > The glass of watered down grapefruit juice added perhaps 10 grams of
        > carbs. (100 cc. of Grapefruit juice contains about 12 grams of carbs... a
        > whole glass of pure grapefruit juice is about 30 grams of carbs.
        >
        > My watered down one-whole-glass of grapefruit juice is only 10 grams of
        > carbs.
        >
        > Lesson learned: I can drop blood glucose much faster with aerobic exercise
        > than with fast-acting-short-duration Humulin "R" (identical in structure to
        > human insulin) which is the insulin I usually use.
        >
        > Several sets of 5 minutes of aerobic exercise, followed by 5 minutes of
        > rest, drops blood sugar MORE THAN the same amount of time doing aerobic
        > exercise without any rest in between. And I can DO it, without being
        > exhausted at the end.
        >
        > I did 12 sets of 5 minutes without any problem getting tired or exhausted.
        >
        > I have done 60 minutes of aerobic exercise without rest in the past, and
        > this time it was MUCH EASIER to do. I would have been much more tired
        > if I had done 60 minutes aerobic exercise straight, without any rest...
        >
        > And it would have dropped blood sugar to about the same 65 mg/dl.
        >
        > EASIER TO DO, WITH SAME RESULT, IS BETTER THAN: DIFFICULT TO DO.
        >
        > I intend to repeat these tests on an empty stomach, and with a high carb
        > breakfast... and maybe other variations.
        >
        > Stay tuned. If anybody has checked their blood glucose after aerobic
        > exercise, please tell us your experience. If anybody can repeat my
        > test, please tell us your experience.
        >
        > NOTE: My experience is COMPLETELY DIFFERENT than what is reported by
        > these persons who are DIABETICS. Their blood sugar goes UP after
        > aerobic or anaerobic exercise.
        >
        > http://www.diabetesdaily.com/forum/exercise/26437-cardio-high-glucose
        >
        > Why do I think their blood sugar goes UP with exercise instead of DOWN?
        > For the same reason that my blood sugar does not go DOWN any more
        > when I reach 65 mg/dl.
        >
        > I think my LIVER releases glucose and keeps it from going DOWN. In a
        > diabetic, the LIVER ALSO releases glucose but then the diabetic does not
        > have the help of the pancreas to keep it in check.
        >
        > I think of it like an elevator that has a force going DOWN (insulin) and brakes
        > going UP to slow the fall (glucose)... The diabetic only has the force
        > going UP, he does not have the force going DOWN so his blood sugar
        > shoots up with nothing to bring it DOWN or steady it out.
        >
        > That is only "according to Ellis"... Take it or leave it... but it is an explanation
        > of why I think these diabetics say their blood sugar goes UP when they do
        > exercise.
        >
        > Advice from endocrinologists, as usual, is not what I would have told this
        > person: "I would love for peoples' advice on how to help even out my high
        > blood sugar levels after intense exercise.
        >
        > My endocrinologist can't give me any advice on this--the only thing she
        > tells me is to make sure to eat 1-2 carbs before exercising..."
        >
        > She wouldn't listen to what I have to say, anyways... but if this person ever
        > reads this post, my advice is to EAT LOW CARB, and PROTEIN, AND FAT.
        >
        > Notice, also, that MY CRITERIA is totally different than these persons below,
        > who are diabetic. Many of these report similar results as I did above. But I
        > would not be AFRAID of a drop of 60 to 80 points... I think it is a REASON
        > TO BE HAPPY and CHEER and DO IT AGAIN.
        >
        > http://www.diabetesdaily.com/forum/exercise/40438-compensating-blood-glucose-drop-during-aerobic-exercise
        >
        > I think blood glucose 65 is great... they think 65 is something to fear.
        >
        > I think that carbs are BAD to avoid hypo-glycemia, and they have been
        > taught to believe that carbs are GOOD to avoid hypo-glycemia.
        >
        > - Ellis Toussier
        >
        >
        > = = = = =
        >
        > (note: I am 67 years old, 5' 11" tall, 160 lbs., HbA1c about 5.2, Body Mass
        > Index about 19, in excellent health, and I am not a diabetic.
        >
        > I try to eat low carb, high protein, no special attempt to avoid or to take
        > more fat. I focus on vegetables and animal origin (eggs, chicken, fish,
        > yoghurt, cheese) and I avoid bread, potatoes, spaghetti, cakes, candies, etc.
        >
        > Chocolate ice cream is my poison
        >
        > I have used a correct dose of insulin at the appropriate time since 2002,
        > to help control blood sugar.
        >
        > That is, more than 20,000 doses of insulin in 11 years.
        >
        > I have had no bad side effects from using a correct dose of insulin at the
        > right time, and I have not become diabetic, and I have not developed insulin
        > resistance, and I have not had brain damage (I think...) and I am not insulin
        > dependent, etc.
        >
        > EVERYTHING THAT DOCTORS THOUGHT WOULD HAPPEN TO ME for using
        > insulin, DID NOT HAPPEN. I am not criticizing doctors. They learned this
        > from their schools and their books, and they taught it to other doctors and
        > practice it with their patients.
        >
        > Nobody dared to prove that they are mistaken.
        >
        > An overdose of Insulin can kill... but the right dose of insulin, I found out,
        > is very good to control blood sugar...
        >
        > I, myself, tried insulin the first time expecting that I might become insulin
        > dependent. But I didn't think that would be such a bad thing to happen, if it
        > would happen, since I had read that well controlled insulin dependent diabetics
        > live LONGER than non-diabetics.
        >
        > As I say tongue-in-cheeck:
        >
        > "Why should only Diabetics have all the fun?"
        >
        > If doctors said it would happen to me, it was sure to be on the list of what
        > did NOT happen to me.)
        >
        > - Ellis Toussier
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Study my personal anti-aging program, Rejuvenation, and study my
        > best pages, Essential, which you are welcome to read and follow,
        > here:
        >
        > Rejuvenation http://www.rajeun.net/rejuvenation.html
        >
        > Essential http://www.rajeun.net/essential.html
        >
        > Some of these pages, now open to the public, will
        > soon be for members only.
        >
        > Search and read the archives of Rejuvenation by going
        > to "Messages" then use the search feature.
        >
        > Please help make it easy for others to subscribe to Rejuvenation.
        > Send this URL to people you would like to subscribe to this
        > discussion:
        >
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/subscribe/Rejuvenation
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • C.Marley
        NEW COMMENTS ARE BELOW THE FOLLOWING SHORT EXCERPT... ... C. Marley: Yes, there IS! There is nothing new about your experiment . The effect has been known
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 6, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          NEW COMMENTS ARE BELOW THE FOLLOWING SHORT EXCERPT...


          On 3/5/2013 9:06 AM, C.Marley wrote:
          > C. Marley: Exercise LOWERS blood sugar in type 2 diabetics.
          >
          > Your muscles eat sugar. It is as simple as that! - cm
          >
          > Ellis: Hello Dr. Marley.
          >
          > With all due respect: I think you have not READ all my post, because
          > if you had, you would see that IT IS NOT "AS SIMPLE AS THAT! "
          >
          > This is what I THINK IS INTERESTING about my own experience, which
          > I find to be not "AS SIMPLE AS THAT"
          >
          > 1. Blood sugar dropped 30 points in the first five minutes, from
          > 123 mg/dl to 93 mg/dl.
          >
          > This is MUCH FASTER than USING "FAST-ACTING" INSULIN. It takes
          > about 60 minutes to drop blood sugar 30 points, using Humulin R.
          >
          > AND it is IN CONTRAST to what happened after my blood sugar got to
          > 65, after 4 sets of 5 minutes. After this, the next EIGHT SETS of
          > 5 minutes, MY BLOOD SUGAR DID NOT DROP ANY LOWER THAN 63.
          >
          > That is not "simple"... It is uneven.
          >
          > There has to be an explanation, and you are a doctor. I would like to
          > hear YOUR explanation.


          C. Marley: Yes, there IS! There is nothing new about your "experiment".

          The effect has been known for many decades.

          Ellis: I looked for reported experiments on PubMed and I didn't find
          any like mine. The closest I could find is a report, from Barbados,
          which I don't trust is correct because, I quote:

          "With type 2 diabetes, a single session improved postprandial BG for
          24 hours, while a 2-week program reduced the average BG by 13% at
          48 to 72 hours after exercise and also increased GLUT4 by 369%."

          Ellis: note: GLUT4, Glucose transporter type 4, is the insulin-regulated
          glucose transporter found in adipose tissues and striated muscle.
          It is responsible for glucose transport into the cell. More GLUT4
          will result in less resistance to insulin.

          abstract:
          http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23467903
          full report here:
          http://www.dovepress.com/the-impact-of-brief-high-intensity-exercise-on-blood-glucose-levels-peer-reviewed-article-DMSO

          I GUARANTEE that high intensity exercise DOES NOT improve
          post prandial Blood Glucose for 24 hours... blood glucose will reflect
          what you eat, and if you eat high carbs a few minutes or hours
          after you did high intensity exercise, the benefit of your high
          intensity exercise ends abruptly, right then and there...

          And to think that high intensity exercise will affect blood glucose 48
          to 72 hours later is wishful thinking, absolutely mistaken, false, and
          not correct... it does not happen. The benefits last until your
          next meal. Then your benefits depend on what you chose to eat.

          I did not find any other studies of the effect of aerobic exercise on
          blood glucose levels at Pub Med. If you can find them, please let
          me study them too.


          C. Marley :Your liver starts making sugar from it's stored glycogen.
          The process is called gluco-neo-genesis. (glucose, new, generation)

          Exercise, along with the falling blood sugar caused by the muscle
          tissue uptake, causes the adrenals to put out increased amounts of
          cortisol and adrenaline.

          These both stimulate the liver to start producing sugar. So after the
          initial drop in glucose, the liver starts cranking out sugar to replace
          what the muscles are using up. It is SIMPLE.



          Ellis: But it is NOT so simple, because my blood glucose dropped
          30 points the first 5 minutes... and it didn't drop at all the last 40
          minutes... And the blood glucose of some diabetics WENT UP when
          they did exercise.

          So it ISN'T SO SIMPLE.

          But there IS an explanation "according to Ellis"

          ("according to Ellis" means I am imagining what happens... deductive
          reasoning, in the manner of Aristotle, which is correct sometimes and
          mistaken sometimes... Aristotle and Friends helped to advance
          science, until Galileo and others showed they made mistakes because
          they did not prove their hypothesis, with tests....

          Aristotle lacked basic instruments which we have everywhere today,
          like thermometers and watches... and the printing press... and blood
          glucose meters.

          But, except for a $75 dollar glucose meter, and perhaps a watch, etc.
          I don't have electron microscopes or M.R.I. or P.E.T. scanners, etc....

          So I must use deductive reasoning, which I know might be mistaken...)

          I THINK the explanation is that blood glucose FROM CARBOHYDRATES
          is DIFFERENT from blood glucose FROM PROTEIN, and they are
          probably both different from blood glucose FROM OIL (FAT).

          High Carb diets have been promoted to athletes based on the
          rationale that high carb is preferable to high fat or protein, and
          therefore maintaining a high muscle glycogen level is essential
          to achieve optimal performance.

          But I expect that my experiments, not yet completed, will show that
          a high carbohydrate diet is neither required nor good for endurance
          athletes because it will cause a loss of neurons and diabetes in the
          long run, and low-carb high-fat and protein can give all the nutrients
          and glycogen that the athlete requires, AND ALSO avoid hypoglycemia
          in the short run (eg, during the marathon run itself...)

          I consider this to be sound reasoning. WE KNOW the harm that high
          blood sugar causes in diabetics... So it is CRAZY to eat in the manner
          that they are eating to train for a race....

          My 12 sets of 5 minutes aerobic exercise and glucose tests show
          that my body was resisting hypoglycemia... I accept your explanation
          that the adrenals released cortisol and adrenaline and the liver then
          released glycogen... Thanks for your input.

          But that happened after I had a high protein breakfast and some
          chocolate ice cream (which I know I should not have eaten, but I
          did, anyways.)

          I want to see if the same happens resistance to hypoglycemia
          will happen after 12 sets of 5 minute aerobic exercise if I have
          eaten a high carb breakfast. And I want to see if a protein or
          high fat drink when I am thirsty is better than diluted grapefruit
          juice.



          C.M. Marley: Insulin facilitates the uptake of glucose by the tissues.

          The fatigue that diabetics have is due to the inability of the tissues
          to take up enough sugar to function at top efficiency. This in turn,
          in type 2 diabetes, is due to insulin resistance of the tissues.

          We are not quite sure of the mechanism, but regular exercise has the
          effect of lowering insulin resistance to some extent, and so is helpful
          in the management of diabetes. - cm


          Ellis: We are not sure of the mechanism, but I can always tell you
          what I think happens "according to Ellis"...

          Insulin resistance occurs when all the cells are FULL... Insulin comes
          knocking on the door, but the doors can't open because the
          warehouse is FULL.

          How did the warehouse get FULL? Because that person ate TOO
          MUCH food... And he ate it when insulin was in the bloodstream and
          it could open the doors.

          As more and more warehouses (cells) get full of energy or whatever
          cells store inside, insulin cannot open them up because they are "Full"...

          So, as more and more cells cannot open up, that is called
          "insulin resistance"...

          EXERCISE BURNS ENERGY... so OF COURSE it helps to LOWER
          INSULIN RESISTANCE....

          EATING CORRECTLY so your blood sugar does not rise and cause
          a high release of insulin, will also help to keep the warehouses closed.

          So if the warehouse is closed, FAT will not be stored inside the cells,
          even if we ate too much, because we ate high fat and protein...

          So we can avoid "getting fat" if we EAT LOW CARBs, high fat, and
          protein.

          Thanks for your input, Dr. Marley. It is greatly appreciated.

          Ellis Toussier

          ABOUT ME: My birth certificate says I am 67 years old. I think I
          look and feel much younger than that.

          I have injected growth hormone almost every day for more than
          15 years.

          I am not a diabetic, but I inject insulin to keep blood sugar levels
          controlled...

          I check my blood sugar several times every day.

          I have no aches or pains in my body, and I walk fast and I have a lot of
          energy. I am sexually well.

          I got a lot of moles and black spots on my face removed a few days
          ago...

          It is good for my looks, but it is also important, to avoid cancer.

          And I do a little bit of exercise, sometimes. I am not a body builder,
          but I like to have a healthy body. My goal is to stay healthy and with
          a good mind, for as long as I live. (I don't know how long I will live...
          but until I catch a cold, I am not worried that I will die soon.)

          - Ellis
          etoussier(at)safe-mail.net
        • C.Marley
          . It is SIMPLE. Ellis: But it is NOT so simple, because my blood glucose dropped 30 points the first 5 minutes... and it didn t drop at all the last 40
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 10, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            . It is SIMPLE.

            Ellis: But it is NOT so simple, because my blood glucose
            dropped 30 points the first 5 minutes... and it didn't drop at all the
            last 40 minutes... And the blood glucose of some diabetics WENT UP when
            they did exercise. So it ISN'T SO SIMPLE.

            C. Marley: Yes it is! It is one of the simplest and best understood E
            concepts in physiology.

            You are confusing type 1 diabetics with type 2 diabetics. Type 1
            diabetics have an autoimmune disease which attacks the Islet cells.
            They have normal insulin sensitivity - they just don't have enough
            insulin.

            Type 2 diabetics have insulin resistance, they have plenty of insulin,
            sometimes too much, but can't use it because their cells are
            insensitive to insulin.

            Some Type 1 diabetics sugar will rise because the liver pumps out
            sugar in response to exercise, but they have very little insulin to
            transport the sugar into the cells.

            Ellis: I THINK the explanation is that blood glucose FROM CARBOHYDRATES
            is DIFFERENT from blood glucose FROM PROTEIN,

            C. Marley: You are mistaken. Glucose is a simple sugar composed of six
            carbon units. Glucose is glucose.

            A little knowledge is a dangerous thing. - cm

            = == =

            Ellis: O.K... I accept I was wrong to think that blood glucose from
            carbs is different from blood glucose from protein, and different
            from protein......

            I may not always be right, but sometimes am right.

            But I still think it is not so simple.

            If it is so simple, then please tell me what do YOU predict will be the
            result when I will do 12 sets of 5 minutes of aerobic exercise WITHOUT
            having had any breakfast... Will my blood glucose drop to around
            65 mg/dl and then stop dropping... or will it go LOWER than 65 mg/dl ?

            I, frankly, don't know what will be the result because although I have
            tested my blood sugar about 25,000 times in the past 10 years, I have
            not done aerobic exercise and tested my blood sugar.

            But I THINK my blood sugar might not drop below 65, anyways...

            What will hold it up? GLUCAGON. A healthy pancreas doesn't only
            have beta cells that release insulin, it also has alfa cells that release
            glucagon. Even though I think my pancreas is a bit beat up already,
            it still works like an old air-conditioner... Not as well as a new
            air-conditioner but better than no air-conditioner.

            I think my pancreas probably has working alfa cells and these alfa
            cells will release glucagon to put on the brakes of falling blood sugar.

            But I also believe my blood sugar could drop to upper 50's.

            But I would bet a dollar that it will not drop into the 40's or less...
            except if I would also take a dose of insulin, which is what some
            diabetic athletes have done... and then they have gone on to prove
            that insulin can kill. Now that I have seen how much blood sugar
            drops with aerobic exercise, I UNDERSTAND what happened to a
            diabetic a few years ago, who died after doing heavy exercise and
            then died in his sleep. I can see it very clearly, what happened.

            I never take insulin on an empty stomach. My golden unbreakable
            rule of using insulin is that I ALWAYS EAT SOMETHING whenever
            I inject insulin. They go together like bread and butter... love and
            marriage... horse and carriage.

            I'm not ashamed to say I was wrong about blood glucose from
            carbs and fat and protein being different. That was only
            Explanation A. The alphabet has more letters, and I can think
            of more explanations.

            Here is explanation B: My blood sugar dropped 30 points in
            5 minutes because my pancreas was not stimulated to shoot
            out glucagon, yet. It is like an elevator that is coming down,
            but the brakes are not applied to slow it down until it is a floor
            or two from where it is intended to stop.

            Then the brakes started to be applied, and it stopped going down
            when it got to about 65 mg/dl.

            When I'm not wrong, maybe it helps me to stay healthy to
            think of an explanation for how things work. Especially blood
            glucose. This is the biggest enemy of our health, and I am glad
            that I imagine how things work... even if I am mistaken when I
            imagine it.

            In any case, what I am trying to do is to avoid getting high blood
            sugar readings, and I'm trying to avoid hypo-glycemia, and I am
            trying to avoid a loss of neurons and diabetes.

            So... my explanation of why it fell so fast and then it didn't fall
            anymore was not correct. But my incorrect explanation would
            still cause anybody who reads it to avoid carbs. So he would do
            the good thing, for the mistaken reason... that is still o.k.

            I agree I like your explanation more than mine... but you didn't
            explain it in your first post. When you explained it, I agree with you,
            your explanation is better than my explanation because I am only
            an ignorant old man.

            But, for example, I might be wrong about using insulin to control blood
            sugar... but here I am, still alive 11 years after I started to use insulin,
            and nothing bad has happened do me, yet.

            So sometimes a little knowledge might be better than a whole lot of
            mistaken knowledge, which is what most doctors know about using
            insulin.

            I told a nurse recently, that I use insulin and I am not a diabetic.
            It was as if I had told Jay Olshansky or Thomas Perl: "I use growth
            hormone and I am not growth hormone deficient"

            IMMEDIATELY her response was: You should not auto-medicate.
            It can cause brain damage.

            I think if she had the power to fine me or forbid me from using
            insulin, she definitely would have fined me, or forbid me to use
            insulin, even if I think it has been fantastic for my good health.

            Ten years and 25,000 doses of insulin... and arrogant doctors still
            think they know more about what I should do for myself, than me.

            FORTUNATELY, MANY DOCTORS NOW ALSO AGREE WITH ME. If
            this would ever be debated in a public forum, I am sure some doctors
            would be on my side.

            "According to Ellis" I AM growth hormone deficient because I am 67
            years old and my body does not release as much HGH as it did when
            I was 25... I want to STAY YOUNG AND LIVE HEALTHY...

            But according to THEIR criteria, it is NORMAL that I should not have
            much HGH in my body and so I SHOULD ACCEPT IT AND GROW OLD AND
            DIE whenever it is my turn...

            Statistically, it will be my turn to kick the bucket in about 5 years,
            age 72 or 73... but why would I kick the bucket if I will still be young
            and healthy and strong?

            Here I am, age 67... already closer to age 68 than to age 67...

            And here I am without any pain in my body... without any disease...
            no heart problem... with plenty of strength... plenty of brown hair still
            growing on my head...

            A few wrinkles here and there... but wrinkles also come because you
            LAUGH a lot, and I am glad to say, I still LAUGH a lot.

            Thanks for writing. Please do tell me what do YOU think will be the
            result when I do 12 sets of 5 minutes of aerobic exercise on an
            empty stomach?

            - Ellis Toussier
          • C.Marley
            ... C. Marley: Your body will do everything it can to keep your blood sugar above 60. Below 60, your hypothalamus tests the blood and says to the adrenals:
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 16, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              On 3/10/2013 9:33 AM, C.Marley wrote:
              >
              > If it is so simple, then please tell me what do YOU predict will be the
              > result when I will do 12 sets of 5 minutes of aerobic exercise WITHOUT
              > having had any breakfast... Will my blood glucose drop to around
              > 65 mg/dl and then stop dropping... or will it go LOWER than 65 mg/dl ?


              C. Marley: Your body will do everything it can to keep your blood sugar
              above 60.

              Below 60, your hypothalamus tests the blood and says to the adrenals:

              "Adrenals, we got a problem here! The glucose level is dropping fast and
              Brain doesn't like it when we get too low on that stuff!

              Got to get Liver making some glucose from all that glycogen she's got
              stored in there!

              Send a cortisol and adrenaline e-mail to Liver, and make it snappy!"

              However if you start dicking around with exogenous insulin, you could
              very well get into trouble, because your normal homeostatic defenses
              were not designed to deal with things injected from the outside.

              cm


              Ellis: Hey! It's contagious! You've been subscribed to Rejuvenation for
              so long that now YOU have the hypothalamus talking with the adrenals and
              sending e-mail messages to the liver!

              I'm glad to see you use your imagination to explain what happens. and I
              AGREE with you, that this is exactly what I think the hypothalamus might
              say to the adrenals.

              We'll know thirty years from now if dicking around with exogenous
              insulin was GOOD for me, or not. I am betting that it will have been
              good for me.

              But IF NOBODY TRIES WHAT I AM DOING because DOCTORS
              WARN US NOT TO DO IT, even after 20,000 shots of insulin
              that I think have been GOOD FOR ME, (because they haven't
              HARMED ME and they DID LOWER BLOOD SUGAR perhaps
              30 points for a few hours, each dose) then NOBODY WILL
              EVER KNOW if it is good or bad.

              The world needs me, Dr. Marley. I might be the crazy man that
              PROVES YOU ARE RIGHT, or I might be the crazy man that proves
              you are mistaken. But there is nobody else that WRITES about it,
              so the world needs a madman to DO what I am doing, and to
              write about it.

              Look: it doesn't COST me much... it doesn't HURT me much...
              it still has NOT CAUSED ME ANY HARM after 20,000 doses of
              insulin... it has LOWERED my blood sugar for a few hours each time
              that I injected insulin...

              So... I will risk that I might get into trouble because I use insulin.

              I also risk that I might get into trouble because I inject growth
              hormone every day. I still have not died because of that, either.

              And I also think it has been GOOD for me. It FEELS GOOD to be
              nearly 68 years old and LAUGH because I AM STILL YOUNG AND
              HEALTHY.

              Even if I should die tomorrow, I have already lived nearly 68 years
              in GOOD HEALTH... Nobody can take that away from me... As we
              say in Mexico, "What you have eaten and what you have danced,
              nobody can take away from you"... I am thankful for my nearly
              68 years in good health.

              Time will tell. I had to choose which road I would take, when I
              saw a lot of wrinkles on my face... and I knew that if I would have
              chosen the same road that everybody else goes on, I would grow
              old...

              I don't know what will happen at the end of the road I chose to
              go down on... but after nearly 16 years of growth hormone and 10
              years using insulin every day, I'm pretty happy that I have taken
              a dose of growth hormone and several doses of insulin every day.

              I wouldn't take the other road now, knowing what this road is like,
              even if I could go back in time. And I won't stop going on this road,
              because I LIKE what has happened... I'm alive... I'm healthy... I'm
              still laughing and playing... and I love being alive.

              So... Why worry about something BAD that might happen, if it hasn't
              happened yet?

              And if something BAD does happen to me, it probably can't be
              ANY WORSE than whatever would have happened to me, anyways!

              We will ALL KICK THE BUCKET, at the end. So that is what will happen
              to ME TOO, some day. It will be the SAME for me as has happened to
              everybody who went before me... I just hope I will not be senile
              near the end. (That is WHY I USE INSULIN !)

              It is what happens BEFORE I KICK THE BUCKET that matters, and so
              far, I'm O.K.

              Thanks for writing.

              Ellis Toussier
            • Mary Angel
              Mary Angel: Very good point of taking the other road. I ask Are you into bodybuilding? There are several 60 year olds here in south Florida that look great
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 1, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                Mary Angel: Very good point of taking the other road. I ask "Are you into
                bodybuilding?"

                There are several 60 year olds here in south Florida that look great better
                than when they were young, but they have taken the road of bodybuilding.


                Ellis: Hello MaryAngel... No... I'm not really a "body builder"...but... I DO
                do exercise... and I have gone to gymnasiums on and off all my life... and
                I own some barbells and various weights, etc.

                But I'm not a "body builder"... I would be the laughing stock in a
                body-building contest, (which I would never enter...)

                I prefer "aerobic" exercise, such as walking or trotting, or in the gym,
                my favorite is the "elliptical..." which is sort-of like climbing stairs...
                without the hurt... I read "AEROBICS" by Dr. Kenneth Cooper many
                years ago, and the information in that book is still good and true today.

                I also read some Charles Atlas exercises, when I was about 15 or 16
                years old. "Dynamic Tension"...

                I can't say that I became an exercise freak, but I always
                understood the importance of exercising.

                And at some point I bought a course by Joe Weider... "weight lifting, etc."
                and I understood the importance of weight lifting and resistance exercises.

                I UNDERSTOOD THE IMPORTANCE, mind you... but I DIDN'T PRACTICE
                WHAT I UNDERSTOOD TO BE IMPORTANT as much as I should have...

                In fact, let me say it: I hardly ever did formal exercise... but I was a fan
                of knowing what to do (but I didn't do it.)

                That is perhaps why I liked taking Growth Hormone: it is the Lazy
                Man's Way to Look Better, without doing much exercise.

                I think my body looks better now, at age 67 nearly-68, than
                it did when I was 25, or 40, or 50...

                But I WILL GUESS that it is not because I knew that I should do exercise
                and didn't do it most of the time, but because I started to use growth
                hormone at age 52... and I started to use testosterone about age 55...

                I think growth hormone and testosterone really help to have more
                energy, and to have a younger looking body. As I like to say (a little
                bit irreverantly) "Thanks to God, and to Eli Lilly"

                Perhaps God gave me my body (which I am amazed with every little bit
                more that I learn about how it works... and I am amazed that I am alive
                and I am aware that I am alive...) but Eli Lilly surely gave me growth
                hormone.

                And somebody gave me testosterone. Thank you, whoever you are.

                I think I am getting closer to be a diabetic, but I am still not a diabetic
                yet... not as defined by the American Diabetes Assoc.

                But I have noticed that if I don't inject insulin at night my fasting blood
                glucose the next morning is higher than before... before, about 105 mg/dl... now, about 115 mg/dl to 120 mg/dl

                That is called "impaired glucose tolerance" which means my pancreas is
                not processing glucose the way I wish I would. At this rate, I expect I
                might be diabetic when my birth certificate will be age 75 or 80.

                So my wish to know that I will die of diabetes might come true, except
                now I think I might become diabetic BEFORE I am dead, and not AFTER I
                am dead... as I was hoping it might be.

                'Tis a pity. Such magnificent man... me... going to drop dead some day.

                Darn! I am mortal, after all !

                And... I confirm I am getting OLDER. I have a bit more GREY HAIRs now
                at age nearly-68 than I did at age nearly-53.

                BUT THAT IS ALL I HAVE AGED in 15 years. So at this rate, I think I
                might die of Old Age at about age 150...

                But diabetes will probably get me before then...

                So I suppose I will die some day, still in a young man's body...

                That's not so bad, is it? It is better than dying in an old man's body.

                Thank you, Eli Lilly. (P.S.: and God too...)

                - Ellis

                To: Rejuvenation@yahoogroups.com
                From: kailasha@...
                Date: Sat, 16 Mar 2013 17:42:27 -0400
                Subject: Re: Experiment No. 1: Blood Glucose and Aerobic Exercise

                On 3/10/2013 9:33 AM, C.Marley wrote:

                > If it is so simple, then please tell me what do YOU predict will be the
                > result when I will do 12 sets of 5 minutes of aerobic exercise WITHOUT
                > having had any breakfast... Will my blood glucose drop to around
                > 65 mg/dl and then stop dropping... or will it go LOWER than 65 mg/dl ?

                C. Marley: Your body will do everything it can to keep your blood sugar
                above 60.

                Below 60, your hypothalamus tests the blood and says to the adrenals:

                "Adrenals, we got a problem here! The glucose level is dropping fast and
                Brain doesn't like it when we get too low on that stuff!

                Got to get Liver making some glucose from all that glycogen she's got
                stored in there!

                Send a cortisol and adrenaline e-mail to Liver, and make it snappy!"

                However if you start dicking around with exogenous insulin, you could
                very well get into trouble, because your normal homeostatic defenses
                were not designed to deal with things injected from the outside.

                cm



                Ellis: Hey! It's contagious! You've been subscribed to Rejuvenation for
                so long that now YOU have the hypothalamus talking with the adrenals and
                sending e-mail messages to the liver!

                I'm glad to see you use your imagination to explain what happens. and I
                AGREE with you, that this is exactly what I think the hypothalamus might
                say to the adrenals.

                We'll know thirty years from now if dicking around with exogenous
                insulin was GOOD for me, or not. I am betting that it will have been
                good for me.

                But IF NOBODY TRIES WHAT I AM DOING because DOCTORS
                WARN US NOT TO DO IT, even after 20,000 shots of insulin
                that I think have been GOOD FOR ME, (because they haven't
                HARMED ME and they DID LOWER BLOOD SUGAR perhaps
                30 points for a few hours, each dose) then NOBODY WILL
                EVER KNOW if it is good or bad.

                The world needs me, Dr. Marley. I might be the crazy man that
                PROVES YOU ARE RIGHT, or I might be the crazy man that proves
                you are mistaken. But there is nobody else that WRITES about it,
                so the world needs a madman to DO what I am doing, and to
                write about it.

                Look: it doesn't COST me much... it doesn't HURT me much...
                it still has NOT CAUSED ME ANY HARM after 20,000 doses of
                insulin... it has LOWERED my blood sugar for a few hours each time
                that I injected insulin...

                So... I will risk that I might get into trouble because I use insulin.

                I also risk that I might get into trouble because I inject growth
                hormone every day. I still have not died because of that, either.

                And I also think it has been GOOD for me. It FEELS GOOD to be
                nearly 68 years old and LAUGH because I AM STILL YOUNG AND
                HEALTHY.

                Even if I should die tomorrow, I have already lived nearly 68 years
                in GOOD HEALTH... Nobody can take that away from me... As we
                say in Mexico, "What you have eaten and what you have danced,
                nobody can take away from you"... I am thankful for my nearly
                68 years in good health.

                Time will tell. I had to choose which road I would take, when I
                saw a lot of wrinkles on my face... and I knew that if I would have
                chosen the same road that everybody else goes on, I would grow
                old...

                I don't know what will happen at the end of the road I chose to
                go down on... but after nearly 16 years of growth hormone and 10
                years using insulin every day, I'm pretty happy that I have taken
                a dose of growth hormone and several doses of insulin every day.

                I wouldn't take the other road now, knowing what this road is like,
                even if I could go back in time. And I won't stop going on this road,
                because I LIKE what has happened... I'm alive... I'm healthy... I'm
                still laughing and playing... and I love being alive.

                So... Why worry about something BAD that might happen, if it hasn't
                happened yet?

                And if something BAD does happen to me, it probably can't be
                ANY WORSE than whatever would have happened to me, anyways!

                We will ALL KICK THE BUCKET, at the end. So that is what will happen
                to ME TOO, some day. It will be the SAME for me as has happened to
                everybody who went before me... I just hope I will not be senile
                near the end. (That is WHY I USE INSULIN !)

                It is what happens BEFORE I KICK THE BUCKET that matters, and so
                far, I'm O.K.

                Thanks for writing.

                Ellis Toussier
              • John Mcgough
                John: There is a new British protocol where they claimed to restore your pancreas in six weeks. However the diet is only 600 cal per day. The theory as to
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 10, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  John: There is a new British protocol where they claimed to
                  restore your pancreas in six weeks. However the diet is only
                  600 cal per day.

                  The theory as to why it works is that the pancreas will lose
                  its excess fat as these people generally are overweight.

                  So my question is: would it work for me, a very fit male?

                  I need a way to determine if my pancreas is loaded with
                  extra fat. Any thoughts?

                  There are also studies that involve fasting which also is to
                  restore the pancreas to normal functioning.

                  John


                  Ellis: Hello John...

                  To answer your question, first... would a 600 calorie diet for
                  6 weeks work for you, a very fit male, to restore your pancreas?

                  If it works for non-fit males, to restore your pancreas...

                  I would suppose that YES, it will work for you too, a very fit male.

                  There is no reason why a GOOD procedure would only work for
                  sick persons. It might only be ATTEMPTED on sick persons,
                  because they are the ones who need it the most...

                  But everything we are discussing and doing on Rejuvenation is
                  what very sick persons should be doing too, but they are not
                  doing it... which is possibly why they are very sick persons.

                  But, yes, yes, yes. I feel sure that if a 600 calorie diet will
                  help the pancreas of sick persons, it will also help the pancreas
                  of very healthy persons to remain very healthy.

                  How to determine if your pancreas is loaded with fat... I don't
                  know about that... How do they determine it with sick persons?
                  Maybe with an ultra-sound? Maybe with x-rays, or blood tests?

                  I know how you can determine if your pancreas is "like new"
                  or "a bit beat up" or "very badly beat up." See my genius
                  page: "Assess Your Pancreas... The Poor Man's Glucose
                  Tolerance Test."

                  http://www.rajeun.net/assess.html

                  Amazing, that I ever wrote that page at all... I read it again,
                  and it is perfect, and I can't believe it is so useful.

                  Even more amazing, that I wrote it when I was just learning
                  about blood glucose and diabetes.

                  Incredible, that a doctor didn't write a similar page many
                  moons before. Where are they? Why didn't anybody write
                  a page like this before I did?

                  Very interesting, the report that a 600 calorie
                  diet might re-set the pancreas... Six weeks, at 600 calories?
                  That shouldn't be difficult to do...

                  All you need is the "Wa-Shu-Fi Vi-Min-O-Pro" formula that
                  I wrote about a few weeks ago. That means:

                  Water + Sugar + Fiber + Vitamins and minerals + Oil (FAT) +
                  Protein...

                  and "Sugar" really means "CALORIES from CARBS or OIL or PROTEIN"

                  So we can simplify the formula as follows, because "sugar" doesn't
                  really have to be there:

                  WATER + CALORIES + FIBER + Vitamins and minerals + Oil (Fat) + Protein

                  THAT'S ALL YOU NEED TO STAY ALIVE and healthy.

                  Remember that? I wrote to say how I was hospitalized in 1984,
                  and they fed me through my veins for three days. I was neither
                  hungry nor thirsty for those three days. It is called "Total
                  Parenteral Nutrition" which means they try to feed your body
                  everything that your body needs.

                  (Note: they do not feed you "fiber" through your veins... I add
                  fiber to the formula, but I eat through my mouth so it is not
                  "Total Parenteral Nutrition"...

                  Let's call it "Total ENTERAL Nutrition" which means, everything
                  our body needs to stay alive and healthy, based on what doctors
                  have found are the essentials in patients who sometimes are
                  unconscious and have to eat through their veins for many years.

                  So I went on to DEFINE a "fast" on my terms... Like Gandhi,
                  who "fasted" only on WATER, for I think 40 days, and he lost
                  a lot of weight which included muscle, and he lost good health...

                  I would prefer to "fast" on 600 calories such that you are
                  allowed by the definition of this fast to DRINK all the water
                  you like, DRINK some fiber, DRINK some vitamins and minerals,
                  DRINK a spoonful of butter or olive oil, and EAT a hard boiled
                  egg or two or three (note: hard boiled egg has plenty of
                  PROTEIN and also Vitamins and minerals, some water, and
                  some FAT... all of which are allowed in the "fast" definition...)

                  You won't eat through your veins, as I did when they fed me
                  through my veins... But you will not be HUNGRY at all, and you
                  will not be THIRSTY at all.. and unlike Gandhi, you will not
                  lose muscle, and your health will probably be maintained.

                  AND of course YOU WILL LOSE FAT.

                  Whether or not you will lose FAT in your pancreas, I CAN'T
                  REALLY SAY...

                  But I will GUESS that if there is FAT in your pancreas, it will
                  probably MELT AWAY, the same as fat everywhere else in your
                  body !

                  And if there is excess fat in your stomach, or in your legs, or
                  in your arms... it will ALSO MELT AWAY from wherever it is.

                  The important thing is: YOU WILL NOT BE HUNGRY... and...
                  YOU WILL NOT BE THIRSTY... and... YOU WILL NOT LOSE YOUR
                  GOOD HEALTH in doing this "Ellis Toussier Fast"...

                  Gandhi had his way of fasting. I have my way of fasting.

                  Gandhi was a great man, and I admire him. But his manner of
                  "fasting" was not good for his good health.

                  So... if you decide to try a 600 calorie meal plan for a few weeks,
                  I THINK YOU CAN DO IT EASILY on 600 calories, with NO THIRST and
                  NO HUNGER but FOLLOW MY INSTRUCTIONS, above.

                  Thanks for writing. Please write again if you try this 600 cal
                  diet plan, and tell us what are your results.

                  - Ellis
                  etoussier(at)safe-mail.net
                • John Mcgough
                  John: Thanks for your answer. I have been taking insulin because of you. Ellis: You have been taking insulin because of me?!! That is a great honor to
                  Message 8 of 9 , Apr 13, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    John: Thanks for your answer. I have been taking insulin because
                    of you.

                    Ellis: You have been taking insulin because of me?!! That is a great
                    honor to know it... I'm very glad whenever I learn that somebody is
                    doing something good for their health which I think you learned
                    from me.



                    John: This has not stopped my pancreas from very slowly getting worse.

                    When I started my morning fasting glucose was 102 without any insulin.

                    When I incorporated insulin my morning fasting glucose was 80.

                    Now three years later with insulin my morning fasting glucose is back
                    to 102.

                    That's why I consider doing the program and my question is whether you
                    would consider doing this calorie restricted program since I noticed from
                    your writings that your insulin readings are following my pattern?

                    - John


                    Ellis: Wait a minute... that's not what I said is happening to me. Yes,
                    I think my pancreas might be advancing on the Road to Diabetes,
                    but my morning fasting glucose is 115 to 120 IF I DO NOT TAKE
                    INSULIN the night before, or if I ate horribly the night before (as I
                    do if I am invited to somebody else's house for dinner... usually
                    very delicious food, but bad for blood glucose.

                    (And... WHENEVER I TAKE INSULIN I always EAT something, at that
                    moment.)

                    The key to control blood glucose is still: EAT LOW CARBS (because
                    SUGAR = 100% carb) and DO SOME AEROBIC EXERCISE whenever
                    you can, especially if your blood glucose is high...

                    And of course, a small dose of insulin before (preferably) or after
                    you eat...

                    And also... attempt to have a small amount of "background insulin"
                    in your blood, which you can get from long-lasting insulin such as
                    Lantus or Levemir. (note: I use Lantus... Dr. Bernstein uses
                    Levemir...)

                    I would like to ask you some questions about your experience using
                    insulin: (note: others who use insulin, please also answer... we will
                    all learn from your experience...)

                    = = = questions to persons who use insulin:

                    How long have you used insulin?

                    What is your Hb A1c ?

                    Which insulin do you use?

                    How often do you inject insulin?

                    How often do you check your blood glucose?

                    Please tell us what have been your results. Do you usually have
                    your blood glucose under control (when you ate low carbs)?

                    Do you think that taking insulin has had any BAD side effect ?

                    Do you think that your pancreas has gotten worse BECAUSE you
                    take insulin?

                    Have you gotten hypo-glycemia? How often since you take
                    insulin have you gotten hypo-glycemia?

                    If you did get hypo-glycemia, to what did you attribute it to?
                    (ie, for what REASON do you think you got hypo-glycemia?)

                    ===
                    Ellis (continued) :

                    If I were you, I would try a small dose of long-lasting insulin, and
                    continue with your fast-acting insulin as you are doing now.


                    After I wrote my post a few days ago saying that my blood sugar
                    is about 115 to 120 in the morning, IF I DO NOT take insulin the
                    night before, I thought about it, and after a few years of not using
                    Lantus, I bought a vial of Lantus and now I am trying it, again.

                    5 iu of Lantus (which in me is equivalent to about one half of
                    one iu steady, for 24 hours) in the morning and 5 iu Lantus in
                    the afternoon about 6 PM should not cause me any problem of
                    hypoglycemia AND it should help to keep my blood sugar
                    controlled (ie, hopefully, below 100 mg/dl.)

                    Somebody wrote to tell me that Dr. Bernstein prescribed a long
                    lasting long acting insulin ("Levemir") to her. She was told to
                    inject a small dose, and check her blood sugar, and keep
                    on increasing the dose until she got 83 mg/dl in the morning
                    fasting blood sugar levels.

                    Now, I started off with 5 iu Lantus in the morning and 5 iu Lantus
                    in the afternoon, (plus Humulin R with meals) and I hope this will
                    result in blood glucose below 100 and after I find my dose, below
                    90's...

                    For your information: I copy and paste what this person who
                    consulted with Dr. Bernstein wrote to me:

                    ==== somebody wrote this to me:
                    if you got hypoglycemia on Lantus because you forgot to eat,
                    you used too much Lantus. Dr. B. taught me to use just enough
                    long lasting insulin to keep my blood sugar at 83 if I don't eat.
                    So, I never get hypoglycemia.

                    Regarding long acting insulin like Lantus or Levemir, Dr. B. had
                    me start with 1/2 a unit and then test my fasting blood sugar at
                    various times during the day.

                    I increased by a 1/2 unit at a time until my fasting blood
                    sugar was around 83 consistently.

                    ====



                    On Apr 10, 2013, at 12:44 PM, John Mcgough <jrwmg@...> wrote:

                    > John: There is a new British protocol where they claimed to
                    > restore your pancreas in six weeks. However the diet is only
                    > 600 cal per day.
                    >
                    > The theory as to why it works is that the pancreas will lose
                    > its excess fat as these people generally are overweight.
                    >
                    > So my question is: would it work for me, a very fit male?
                    >
                    > I need a way to determine if my pancreas is loaded with
                    > extra fat. Any thoughts?
                    >
                    > There are also studies that involve fasting which also is to
                    > restore the pancreas to normal functioning.
                    >
                    > John
                    >
                    > Ellis: Hello John...
                    >
                    > To answer your question, first... would a 600 calorie diet for
                    > 6 weeks work for you, a very fit male, to restore your pancreas?
                    >
                    > If it works for non-fit males, to restore your pancreas...
                    >
                    > I would suppose that YES, it will work for you too, a very fit male.
                    >
                    > There is no reason why a GOOD procedure would only work for
                    > sick persons. It might only be ATTEMPTED on sick persons,
                    > because they are the ones who need it the most...
                    >
                    > But everything we are discussing and doing on Rejuvenation is
                    > what very sick persons should be doing too, but they are not
                    > doing it... which is possibly why they are very sick persons.
                    >
                    > But, yes, yes, yes. I feel sure that if a 600 calorie diet will
                    > help the pancreas of sick persons, it will also help the pancreas
                    > of very healthy persons to remain very healthy.
                    >
                    > How to determine if your pancreas is loaded with fat... I don't
                    > know about that... How do they determine it with sick persons?
                    > Maybe with an ultra-sound? Maybe with x-rays, or blood tests?
                    >
                    > I know how you can determine if your pancreas is "like new"
                    > or "a bit beat up" or "very badly beat up." See my genius
                    > page: "Assess Your Pancreas... The Poor Man's Glucose
                    > Tolerance Test."
                    >
                    > http://www.rajeun.net/assess.html
                    >
                    > Amazing, that I ever wrote that page at all... I read it again,
                    > and it is perfect, and I can't believe it is so useful.
                    >
                    > Even more amazing, that I wrote it when I was just learning
                    > about blood glucose and diabetes.
                    >
                    > Incredible, that a doctor didn't write a similar page many
                    > moons before. Where are they? Why didn't anybody write
                    > a page like this before I did?
                    >
                    > Very interesting, the report that a 600 calorie
                    > diet might re-set the pancreas... Six weeks, at 600 calories?
                    > That shouldn't be difficult to do...
                    >
                    > All you need is the "Wa-Shu-Fi Vi-Min-O-Pro" formula that
                    > I wrote about a few weeks ago. That means:
                    >
                    > Water + Sugar + Fiber + Vitamins and minerals + Oil (FAT) +
                    > Protein...
                    >
                    > and "Sugar" really means "CALORIES from CARBS or OIL or PROTEIN"
                    >
                    > So we can simplify the formula as follows, because "sugar" doesn't
                    > really have to be there:
                    >
                    > WATER + CALORIES + FIBER + Vitamins and minerals + Oil (Fat) + Protein
                    >
                    > THAT'S ALL YOU NEED TO STAY ALIVE and healthy.
                    >
                    > Remember that? I wrote to say how I was hospitalized in 1984,
                    > and they fed me through my veins for three days. I was neither
                    > hungry nor thirsty for those three days. It is called "Total
                    > Parenteral Nutrition" which means they try to feed your body
                    > everything that your body needs.
                    >
                    > (Note: they do not feed you "fiber" through your veins... I add
                    > fiber to the formula, but I eat through my mouth so it is not
                    > "Total Parenteral Nutrition"...
                    >
                    > Let's call it "Total ENTERAL Nutrition" which means, everything
                    > our body needs to stay alive and healthy, based on what doctors
                    > have found are the essentials in patients who sometimes are
                    > unconscious and have to eat through their veins for many years.
                    >
                    > So I went on to DEFINE a "fast" on my terms... Like Gandhi,
                    > who "fasted" only on WATER, for I think 40 days, and he lost
                    > a lot of weight which included muscle, and he lost good health...
                    >
                    > I would prefer to "fast" on 600 calories such that you are
                    > allowed by the definition of this fast to DRINK all the water
                    > you like, DRINK some fiber, DRINK some vitamins and minerals,
                    > DRINK a spoonful of butter or olive oil, and EAT a hard boiled
                    > egg or two or three (note: hard boiled egg has plenty of
                    > PROTEIN and also Vitamins and minerals, some water, and
                    > some FAT... all of which are allowed in the "fast" definition...)
                    >
                    > You won't eat through your veins, as I did when they fed me
                    > through my veins... But you will not be HUNGRY at all, and you
                    > will not be THIRSTY at all.. and unlike Gandhi, you will not
                    > lose muscle, and your health will probably be maintained.
                    >
                    > AND of course YOU WILL LOSE FAT.
                    >
                    > Whether or not you will lose FAT in your pancreas, I CAN'T
                    > REALLY SAY...
                    >
                    > But I will GUESS that if there is FAT in your pancreas, it will
                    > probably MELT AWAY, the same as fat everywhere else in your
                    > body !
                    >
                    > And if there is excess fat in your stomach, or in your legs, or
                    > in your arms... it will ALSO MELT AWAY from wherever it is.
                    >
                    > The important thing is: YOU WILL NOT BE HUNGRY... and...
                    > YOU WILL NOT BE THIRSTY... and... YOU WILL NOT LOSE YOUR
                    > GOOD HEALTH in doing this "Ellis Toussier Fast"...
                    >
                    > Gandhi had his way of fasting. I have my way of fasting.
                    >
                    > Gandhi was a great man, and I admire him. But his manner of
                    > "fasting" was not good for his good health.
                    >
                    > So... if you decide to try a 600 calorie meal plan for a few weeks,
                    > I THINK YOU CAN DO IT EASILY on 600 calories, with NO THIRST and
                    > NO HUNGER but FOLLOW MY INSTRUCTIONS, above.
                    >
                    > Thanks for writing. Please write again if you try this 600 cal
                    > diet plan, and tell us what are your results.
                    >
                    > - Ellis
                    > etoussier(at)safe-mail.net
                    >
                  • John Mcgough
                    John: In response to your questions: I have been using insulin for approximately 4 years. I use Humulin R ( regular ) before meals and Humalog (fast-acting
                    Message 9 of 9 , Apr 16, 2013
                    • 0 Attachment
                      John: In response to your questions: I have been using
                      insulin for approximately 4 years.

                      I use Humulin R ("regular") before meals and Humalog
                      (fast-acting short-duration) three hours after meals if
                      my level is not satisfactory after testing with my glucose
                      meter.

                      Through experience I have learned that my blood sugar
                      peaks two and half hours after eating.

                      My Hb A1c is 5.4

                      I check my glucose about six times a day.

                      I inject In the morning when I get up, and I use fast-acting
                      after doing a reading.

                      I inject Humulin R before each meal and I inject with
                      fast-acting Humalog if my reading is too high 3 hrs after a meal.

                      Before I go to bed I check again, and I usually have to inject
                      fast acting because my glucose level always wants to go back
                      up to 102. Even if I wake up at 2 AM and inject to lower it to
                      70 , in the morning it will still be around 100.

                      (Ellis: note: this is "normal" because the liver shoots out glucose
                      early in the morning, to start to wake you up. Dr. Bernstein calls
                      it "the Dawn Phenomenon"... You could probably lessen its effect
                      with long-lasting insulin such as Lantus or Levemir.)

                      John: I agree I need a long lasting insulin. However I am afraid to
                      take Lantus because there are four European studies showing
                      it is linked to cancer.

                      Levemir would be my choice but it is very expensive and I need
                      to get a prescription. That's not easy to do when you are not
                      officially a diabetic.

                      The other insulins I use are sold over the counter in Canada without
                      a prescription. Any ideas on how I can get these?

                      Of course I believe I've only been helped by using insulin as I
                      can avoid the highs.

                      I have experimented with going hypoglycemic to increase growth
                      hormone per your suggestion. I find that I am fine until I reach
                      57 when I noticed some slight effects.

                      The biggest difference between our philosophies is that I will eat
                      the entire fruit And make fresh vegetables juices as I believe it is
                      Essential for my personal Health as it is part of my cancer diet.

                      I was diagnosed with myeloma a terminal cancer 32 years ago.

                      I have learned how much insulin to take to compensate for the
                      fruit and fresh juices. Otherwise those are the only carbs I consume,
                      meaning I do not eat rice, potatoes, bread etc.

                      Our other difference is that I do strenuous physical exercise for
                      one hour, six days a week.

                      If the British protocol would work and restore my pancreas then
                      I would need even less insulin which I think would be a good
                      thing.

                      John



                      Ellis: Hello John...

                      The proof is in the pudding, as they say. You are alive and
                      still kicking 32 years after you had terminal cancer...

                      That says something to me: You practice what you preach much
                      better than I do. I should start imitating you a bit. I WISH I would
                      do one hour of strenuous exercise every day.

                      And I WISH I could say point blank, as you do: "I do not eat rice,
                      potatoes, or bread." I AVOID rice, potatoes and bread, and I would
                      say I eat very little rice, potatoes, and bread... But in fact I eat one
                      of these almost every day. My philosophy about eating these foods
                      that I know are bad for my health is

                      "Eat Twice of the Good, and Half of the Bad."

                      That is not as good as Dr. Bernstein's, who says his Hb A1c is
                      4.5% and whose philosophy I suppose would be "Eat Twice of
                      the Good, and None of the Bad."

                      But that is the truth of how I eat. I avoid the worst, but usually
                      I eat a little of what is Delicious But Bad.

                      In any case, I congratulate you for your decision to use insulin,
                      and for checking your blood glucose six times each day.

                      Most diabetes specialists don't recommend to use insulin...

                      I think you are LUCKY to have bumped into me (excuse my
                      modesty, but it is true...) and so you learned a very unusual idea
                      from me which I am convinced is correct... and I am glad that
                      you took your own decision to use insulin correctly, because
                      I know it is correct to keep blood sugar controlled, even if
                      almost every doctor who practices medicine thinks I am wrong,
                      except my doctors, who agree with my decision...

                      And I am very happy to know that you are not a diabetic and you
                      are using insulin, too...

                      And I am happy that you always monitor what happens to your
                      blood sugar with a blood glucose meter, because there is no
                      other way to know for sure what is your blood glucose... Even
                      after more than 25,000 blood glucose tests, I do not trust
                      what I GUESS, with better than plus or minus 15% error. But
                      that is not good enough.

                      I suppose you learned that from me, too, because most diabetes
                      doctors are OPPOSED that their patients should monitor blood sugar
                      constantly because they say it is "obsessive".

                      Yes, if keeping blood sugar tightly controlled is "obsessive" then
                      it is good to be "obsessed" to keep blood sugar controlled. I know
                      this will be better for my good health in the long run than if my
                      blood sugar goes higher than 100 mg/dl... and if I don't test often,
                      I can't do it.

                      So I am happy that YOU do it, too.

                      But I disagree with you about using Lantus, which you are afraid
                      to use because "it might cause cancer". You are staying away
                      from lowering your blood glucose a lot better, which you would
                      like to do and you know how to do it, for fear of some studies that
                      are controversial anyways.

                      Cancer appears in one out of three persons in the world anyways,
                      and the same people who are in the age to have diabetes are the
                      ones with most probability of getting cancer.

                      So how can a study show that those who used Lantus also got
                      more cancer, unless that study was done on millions of persons
                      who did, and millions of persons who did not take Lantus?

                      It is too easy for somebody to do a study and come to a mistaken
                      conclusion. They do it all the time, with growth hormone. I
                      don't listen to them, I listen to my eyes and my results.

                      In any case... I think you would be better off to get the benefit of
                      Lantus which you know will lower blood glucose in the morning,
                      and try to detect cancer if it should happen, with the P.S.A. or the
                      A.M.A.S. tests.

                      And continue to avoid the known risk factors of cancer and heart
                      attack, which are the biggest killers. So, avoid smoking, obesity,
                      high blood glucose, high blood pressure, etc.

                      There are studies that show that high IGF-1 is associated with cancer,
                      and there are doctors that say that HGH might cause cancer... and
                      I take a dose of HGH every day, which gives me a high IGF-1.

                      Am I going to listen to a European study, or to Jay Olshansky or
                      Thomas Perls, more than I am going to listen to my own body and
                      my own good results? No!

                      Please do a Google search for "Lantus cancer"

                      I worry more about high blood glucose in the morning which I
                      know I would like to lower, and I know how to lower it, than
                      worry about cancer caused by Lantus which lowers my morning
                      blood glucose, which is what I want. I'll go with Lantus.

                      The only side effect I want to avoid is hypoglycemia by Lantus...

                      And that I will do by not overdosing on Lantus.

                      You check your blood glucose about 6 times each day... In one
                      year, that is 365 x 6 = 2,190... in 4 years that is almost 9,000
                      blood tests!

                      And if you injected 3 times each day for 365 days for 4 years,
                      that is nearly 4,000 doses of insulin... so far...

                      Question: Have you noticed any BAD side effect from this
                      experiment? Have you noticed that you damaged your pancreas?
                      Or that you have had any brain damage? Do you feel you MUST
                      inject insulin, ie, do you think you have become ADDICTED to insulin?

                      I LIKE very much that you try to bring your blood glucose down
                      from 102. Many diabetes doctors would be opposed to this,
                      for the fear of hypoglycemia.

                      But I AM SURE that is the right thing to do because I ASKED
                      Dr. BERNSTEIN precisely THAT QUESTION: What do you do if
                      your blood sugar is 100 (mg/dl) ? He answered, he takes a dose
                      of insulin to bring it down.

                      If you take the correct dose of insulin, and you take a bite to
                      eat, there is no reason I can think of why you would get hypo-
                      glycemia. But that is typical Dr. Bernstein vs. the entire American
                      Diabetes Association. (Viva Bernstein !)

                      So if you have injected 4000 doses, and if each dose brought
                      your blood sugar level down for 4 hours each time, that is already
                      16,000 hours that your blood sugar was less than it would have
                      been if you had NOT injected insulin. I expect that in the long
                      run, this will mean better health for you.

                      Less damage to the cells of your body also means you are
                      slowing down telomere shortening.

                      Have you noticed ANY bad side effect at all?

                      MANY diabetics have told me that their doctors have TOLD THEM
                      that 130 mg/dl, or even more, is "good". If the DOCTOR is
                      lenient, the patient is always MORE lenient. Which is why they
                      are VERY HAPPY to have HbA1c about 6.0 or even 7.0, (which
                      is "HORRIBLE" or "DEATHLY" "according to Ellis")...

                      How sad it is, in my opinion, for Americans not to be able to buy
                      medicines that are available over the counter in Canada and Mexico
                      and Europe... You cannot buy them freely without begging a doctor
                      to give you a prescription. I don't know how you can get the
                      insulin that you would like in Canada... go on a vacation to
                      Canada, I suppose...

                      Congress created a monster, and the monster is totally out of
                      control. Tijuana is full of American doctors who have made
                      Tijuana a large center for "alternative medicine" meaning everything
                      that is NOT PERMITTED for them to do or try, across the border.
                      And it is also full of Americans buying medicines that they can't buy
                      on the other side of the border...

                      Why must Americans have to travel to another country in order to
                      be able to buy something that you would like to put into your body,
                      because you cannot buy it without a prescription in the U.S.A.? Why
                      isn't a prescription required in other countries, and it is in the U.S.A.?
                      Has anybody heard of any country that has had a health crisis
                      or anybody sick or dying because we can buy growth hormone or
                      long-lasting insulin without a prescription?

                      It makes you wonder: Which side of the border is the Land of the
                      Free? Free, to do What? On which side of the border are there
                      2,000,000 persons locked up in jail, many of them for petty
                      reasons? (such as smoking mariguana, which you may or may not
                      agree is a good or bad thing to do... but ultimately, it harms
                      nobody except the liquor industry...)

                      So then, why are they in jail?

                      Perhaps if you find a diabetes doctor who is also a diabetic
                      himself he can give you a prescription for Levemir... of course
                      you have to pay at the front desk, for a prescription. Why do you
                      need to consult a doctor for something which you know more
                      about than he does, and you have to beg for a prescription for
                      something you already know you need?

                      Thanks for writing.

                      Ellis Toussier

                      On Apr 13, 2013, at 9:57 AM, John Mcgough wrote:

                      > John: Thanks for your answer. I have been taking insulin because
                      > of you.
                      >
                      > Ellis: You have been taking insulin because of me?!! That is a great
                      > honor to know it... I'm very glad whenever I learn that somebody is
                      > doing something good for their health which I think you learned
                      > from me.
                      >
                      > John: This has not stopped my pancreas from very slowly getting worse.
                      >
                      > When I started my morning fasting glucose was 102 without any insulin.
                      >
                      > When I incorporated insulin my morning fasting glucose was 80.
                      >
                      > Now three years later with insulin my morning fasting glucose is back
                      > to 102.
                      >
                      > That's why I consider doing the program and my question is whether you
                      > would consider doing this calorie restricted program since I noticed from
                      > your writings that your insulin readings are following my pattern?
                      >
                      > - John
                      >
                      > Ellis: Wait a minute... that's not what I said is happening to me. Yes,
                      > I think my pancreas might be advancing on the Road to Diabetes,
                      > but my morning fasting glucose is 115 to 120 IF I DO NOT TAKE
                      > INSULIN the night before, or if I ate horribly the night before (as I
                      > do if I am invited to somebody else's house for dinner... usually
                      > very delicious food, but bad for blood glucose.
                      >
                      > (And... WHENEVER I TAKE INSULIN I always EAT something, at that
                      > moment.)
                      >
                      > The key to control blood glucose is still: EAT LOW CARBS (because
                      > SUGAR = 100% carb) and DO SOME AEROBIC EXERCISE whenever
                      > you can, especially if your blood glucose is high...
                      >
                      > And of course, a small dose of insulin before (preferably) or after
                      > you eat...
                      >
                      > And also... attempt to have a small amount of "background insulin"
                      > in your blood, which you can get from long-lasting insulin such as
                      > Lantus or Levemir. (note: I use Lantus... Dr. Bernstein uses
                      > Levemir...)
                      >
                      > I would like to ask you some questions about your experience using
                      > insulin: (note: others who use insulin, please also answer... we will
                      > all learn from your experience...)
                      >
                      > = = = questions to persons who use insulin:
                      >
                      > How long have you used insulin?
                      >
                      > What is your Hb A1c ?
                      >
                      > Which insulin do you use?
                      >
                      > How often do you inject insulin?
                      >
                      > How often do you check your blood glucose?
                      >
                      > Please tell us what have been your results. Do you usually have
                      > your blood glucose under control (when you ate low carbs)?
                      >
                      > Do you think that taking insulin has had any BAD side effect ?
                      >
                      > Do you think that your pancreas has gotten worse BECAUSE you
                      > take insulin?
                      >
                      > Have you gotten hypo-glycemia? How often since you take
                      > insulin have you gotten hypo-glycemia?
                      >
                      > If you did get hypo-glycemia, to what did you attribute it to?
                      > (ie, for what REASON do you think you got hypo-glycemia?)
                      >
                      > ===
                      > Ellis (continued) :
                      >
                      > If I were you, I would try a small dose of long-lasting insulin, and
                      > continue with your fast-acting insulin as you are doing now.
                      >
                      > After I wrote my post a few days ago saying that my blood sugar
                      > is about 115 to 120 in the morning, IF I DO NOT take insulin the
                      > night before, I thought about it, and after a few years of not using
                      > Lantus, I bought a vial of Lantus and now I am trying it, again.
                      >
                      > 5 iu of Lantus (which in me is equivalent to about one half of
                      > one iu steady, for 24 hours) in the morning and 5 iu Lantus in
                      > the afternoon about 6 PM should not cause me any problem of
                      > hypoglycemia AND it should help to keep my blood sugar
                      > controlled (ie, hopefully, below 100 mg/dl.)
                      >
                      > Somebody wrote to tell me that Dr. Bernstein prescribed a long
                      > lasting long acting insulin ("Levemir") to her. She was told to
                      > inject a small dose, and check her blood sugar, and keep
                      > on increasing the dose until she got 83 mg/dl in the morning
                      > fasting blood sugar levels.
                      >
                      > Now, I started off with 5 iu Lantus in the morning and 5 iu Lantus
                      > in the afternoon, (plus Humulin R with meals) and I hope this will
                      > result in blood glucose below 100 and after I find my dose, below
                      > 90's...
                      >
                      > For your information: I copy and paste what this person who
                      > consulted with Dr. Bernstein wrote to me:
                      >
                      > ==== somebody wrote this to me:
                      > if you got hypoglycemia on Lantus because you forgot to eat,
                      > you used too much Lantus. Dr. B. taught me to use just enough
                      > long lasting insulin to keep my blood sugar at 83 if I don't eat.
                      > So, I never get hypoglycemia.
                      >
                      > Regarding long acting insulin like Lantus or Levemir, Dr. B. had
                      > me start with 1/2 a unit and then test my fasting blood sugar at
                      > various times during the day.
                      >
                      > I increased by a 1/2 unit at a time until my fasting blood
                      > sugar was around 83 consistently.
                      >
                      > ====
                      >
                      > On Apr 10, 2013, at 12:44 PM, John Mcgough <jrwmg@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > > John: There is a new British protocol where they claimed to
                      > > restore your pancreas in six weeks. However the diet is only
                      > > 600 cal per day.
                      > >
                      > > The theory as to why it works is that the pancreas will lose
                      > > its excess fat as these people generally are overweight.
                      > >
                      > > So my question is: would it work for me, a very fit male?
                      > >
                      > > I need a way to determine if my pancreas is loaded with
                      > > extra fat. Any thoughts?
                      > >
                      > > There are also studies that involve fasting which also is to
                      > > restore the pancreas to normal functioning.
                      > >
                      > > John
                      > >
                      > > Ellis: Hello John...
                      > >
                      > > To answer your question, first... would a 600 calorie diet for
                      > > 6 weeks work for you, a very fit male, to restore your pancreas?
                      > >
                      > > If it works for non-fit males, to restore your pancreas...
                      > >
                      > > I would suppose that YES, it will work for you too, a very fit male.
                      > >
                      > > There is no reason why a GOOD procedure would only work for
                      > > sick persons. It might only be ATTEMPTED on sick persons,
                      > > because they are the ones who need it the most...
                      > >
                      > > But everything we are discussing and doing on Rejuvenation is
                      > > what very sick persons should be doing too, but they are not
                      > > doing it... which is possibly why they are very sick persons.
                      > >
                      > > But, yes, yes, yes. I feel sure that if a 600 calorie diet will
                      > > help the pancreas of sick persons, it will also help the pancreas
                      > > of very healthy persons to remain very healthy.
                      > >
                      > > How to determine if your pancreas is loaded with fat... I don't
                      > > know about that... How do they determine it with sick persons?
                      > > Maybe with an ultra-sound? Maybe with x-rays, or blood tests?
                      > >
                      > > I know how you can determine if your pancreas is "like new"
                      > > or "a bit beat up" or "very badly beat up." See my genius
                      > > page: "Assess Your Pancreas... The Poor Man's Glucose
                      > > Tolerance Test."
                      > >
                      > > http://www.rajeun.net/assess.html
                      > >
                      > > Amazing, that I ever wrote that page at all... I read it again,
                      > > and it is perfect, and I can't believe it is so useful.
                      > >
                      > > Even more amazing, that I wrote it when I was just learning
                      > > about blood glucose and diabetes.
                      > >
                      > > Incredible, that a doctor didn't write a similar page many
                      > > moons before. Where are they? Why didn't anybody write
                      > > a page like this before I did?
                      > >
                      > > Very interesting, the report that a 600 calorie
                      > > diet might re-set the pancreas... Six weeks, at 600 calories?
                      > > That shouldn't be difficult to do...
                      > >
                      > > All you need is the "Wa-Shu-Fi Vi-Min-O-Pro" formula that
                      > > I wrote about a few weeks ago. That means:
                      > >
                      > > Water + Sugar + Fiber + Vitamins and minerals + Oil (FAT) +
                      > > Protein...
                      > >
                      > > and "Sugar" really means "CALORIES from CARBS or OIL or PROTEIN"
                      > >
                      > > So we can simplify the formula as follows, because "sugar" doesn't
                      > > really have to be there:
                      > >
                      > > WATER + CALORIES + FIBER + Vitamins and minerals + Oil (Fat) + Protein
                      > >
                      > > THAT'S ALL YOU NEED TO STAY ALIVE and healthy.
                      > >
                      > > Remember that? I wrote to say how I was hospitalized in 1984,
                      > > and they fed me through my veins for three days. I was neither
                      > > hungry nor thirsty for those three days. It is called "Total
                      > > Parenteral Nutrition" which means they try to feed your body
                      > > everything that your body needs.
                      > >
                      > > (Note: they do not feed you "fiber" through your veins... I add
                      > > fiber to the formula, but I eat through my mouth so it is not
                      > > "Total Parenteral Nutrition"...
                      > >
                      > > Let's call it "Total ENTERAL Nutrition" which means, everything
                      > > our body needs to stay alive and healthy, based on what doctors
                      > > have found are the essentials in patients who sometimes are
                      > > unconscious and have to eat through their veins for many years.
                      > >
                      > > So I went on to DEFINE a "fast" on my terms... Like Gandhi,
                      > > who "fasted" only on WATER, for I think 40 days, and he lost
                      > > a lot of weight which included muscle, and he lost good health...
                      > >
                      > > I would prefer to "fast" on 600 calories such that you are
                      > > allowed by the definition of this fast to DRINK all the water
                      > > you like, DRINK some fiber, DRINK some vitamins and minerals,
                      > > DRINK a spoonful of butter or olive oil, and EAT a hard boiled
                      > > egg or two or three (note: hard boiled egg has plenty of
                      > > PROTEIN and also Vitamins and minerals, some water, and
                      > > some FAT... all of which are allowed in the "fast" definition...)
                      > >
                      > > You won't eat through your veins, as I did when they fed me
                      > > through my veins... But you will not be HUNGRY at all, and you
                      > > will not be THIRSTY at all.. and unlike Gandhi, you will not
                      > > lose muscle, and your health will probably be maintained.
                      > >
                      > > AND of course YOU WILL LOSE FAT.
                      > >
                      > > Whether or not you will lose FAT in your pancreas, I CAN'T
                      > > REALLY SAY...
                      > >
                      > > But I will GUESS that if there is FAT in your pancreas, it will
                      > > probably MELT AWAY, the same as fat everywhere else in your
                      > > body !
                      > >
                      > > And if there is excess fat in your stomach, or in your legs, or
                      > > in your arms... it will ALSO MELT AWAY from wherever it is.
                      > >
                      > > The important thing is: YOU WILL NOT BE HUNGRY... and...
                      > > YOU WILL NOT BE THIRSTY... and... YOU WILL NOT LOSE YOUR
                      > > GOOD HEALTH in doing this "Ellis Toussier Fast"...
                      > >
                      > > Gandhi had his way of fasting. I have my way of fasting.
                      > >
                      > > Gandhi was a great man, and I admire him. But his manner of
                      > > "fasting" was not good for his good health.
                      > >
                      > > So... if you decide to try a 600 calorie meal plan for a few weeks,
                      > > I THINK YOU CAN DO IT EASILY on 600 calories, with NO THIRST and
                      > > NO HUNGER but FOLLOW MY INSTRUCTIONS, above.
                      > >
                      > > Thanks for writing. Please write again if you try this 600 cal
                      > > diet plan, and tell us what are your results.
                      > >
                      > > - Ellis
                      > > etoussier(at)safe-mail.net
                      > >
                      >
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.