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* * * DIABETIC TYPE 1: I SHARE MY THOUGHTS ABOUT YOUR HbA1c chart

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  • Ellis2ca
    Ellis: At last, a diabetic who LIKES my HbA1c to Glucose conversion table which you can see here: http://www.rajeun.net/HbA1c_glucose.html I got this e-mail
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 3, 2012
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      Ellis: At last, a diabetic who LIKES my HbA1c to Glucose conversion table which
      you can see here:

      http://www.rajeun.net/HbA1c_glucose.html

      I got this e-mail today from Jon, a diabetic Type 1 since age 23....

      Yes... I know my chart is tough... but life is tough... It is too bad that
      it is perhaps very tough for diabetics, but the force of gravity pulls the
      same on diabetics as on non-diabetics, and blood glucose does the
      same damage to diabetics as to non-diabetics...

      That's sad, isn't it? It is unfair... But it is a FACT.

      I comment below in CAPITAL LETTERS.... - Ellis

      =======

      JON: Hi Ellis,

      Good afternoon! I thought I'd reach out to you today and share my thoughts on your HbA1c chart. I am 25, diagnosed T1 at 23, almost two years ago.

      I strongly believe that the standards put out by doctors and the ADA are far too lax. I was told upon diagnosis to try to keep it under 200. How is this acceptable? I always hear people say that 'for a diabetic, such and such a level is acceptable.' I think that is nonsense. I aim for normal, non-diabetic levels.

      Ellis: IT IS DR. BERNSTEIN VS. THE A.D.A. NOW AND IT SEEMS LIKE FOREVER FOR
      THEY WILL NEVER CHANGE... DR. BERNSTEIN WANTS HIS PATIENTS TO TRY TO
      KEEP BLOOD SUGAR NEAR 83 MG/DL AND THE A.D.A. RECOMMENDS THESE
      INCREDIBLY IRRESPONSIBLY HIGH TARGETS FOR BLOOD GLUCOSE. WHAT'S
      GOING ON HERE? IMAGINE: "TRY TO KEEP IT UNDER 200 !!!"


      JON: People seem to think that because we have diabetes, we should be more lenient with ourselves. There seems to be a lot of negative responses on your website, people saying that your advice will kill people, etc.

      I do think that your chart stating that 4.0%-4.4% as 'excellent' is a bit too low.

      ELLIS: ACTUALLY, I REALLY THINK THAT 4.5 IS THE SINGLE BEST POINT...

      4.0 TO 4.4 WOULD BE EVEN BETTER, BUT IT IS THEORETICAL... I HAVE NEVER
      ACTUALLY HEARD OF ANYBODY WITH LESS THAN 4.5%...

      I WILL ADJUST MY CHART... IT SHOULD ACTUALLY START FROM 4.5% AND
      NOT FROM 4.0%... THEORETICALLY, AVERAGE GLUCOSE OF 70 MG/DL IS
      EXCELLENT, BUT IN ORDER TO GET AN "AVERAGE OF 70 YOU WOULD HAVE
      ALSO HAVE HAD TO GET 50'S AND 40'S TO AVERAGE OUT THE 90'S AND 100'S...
      SO THAT WOULD BE VERY BAD.

      JON: My most recent A1c was a 4.8, which I'm very pleased with, and every A1c I've had since diagnosis was below 5.4.

      You are one of the few advocates I've ever seen publicly stating that the accepted standards are way off, and I'm glad to see that someone shares my opinion on this.

      People think that 7.0% is good or acceptable?! That's an average of 170+mg/dl!

      ELLIS: PEOPLE THINK WHAT THEIR DOCTOR TELLS THEM TO THINK... THE
      PROBLEM IS THAT MOST DOCTORS LEARN THIS BAD ADVICE FROM THEIR
      TEACHERS, AND THEN THEY THINK IT IS CORRECT SO THEY TEACH IT TO
      THEIR PATIENTS. IT IS DIFFICULT TO BREAK THE VICIOUS CIRCLE, WHEN
      THE GROUND WORK WAS MISTAKEN. DR. BERNSTEIN IS A MAVERICK,
      BECAUSE HE THINKS FOR HIMSELF, AND HE HAS HAD TO FIGHT THE A.D.A.
      ALL HIS LIFE, IN ORDER TO TEACH US OTHER IDEAS.


      JON: For me, anything over 120, at any given time, is unacceptable.

      ELLIS: I AGREE WITH YOU.

      JON: I recently saw a video review of a new meter, and the woman checked her
      level in the video. It was 10.3 mmol (about 185 mg/dl) and her response was
      "Hm, not bad." I would have gone crazy if mine were 10.3 at a random check.

      Anyway, it's a personal choice as to how tight our control is, but I just wanted
      you to know that I think you're absolutely right. Tight control and a lower A1c
      does not mean death or extreme danger.


      ELLIS: IT CAN MEAN DEATH AND EXTREME DANGER, IF THE PATIENT IS NOT
      TAUGHT "THE LAW OF SMALL NUMBERS" WHICH MEANS: EAT A SMALL MEAL
      THAT WILL NOT RAISE YOUR BLOOD SUGAR TOO HIGH. INJECT A TINY DOSE
      OF FAST ACTING SHORT DURATION INSULIN (EG, HUMULIN "R") AT THE
      RIGHT MOMENT.

      THE RIGHT DOSE, AT THE RIGHT MOMENT.

      IN OTHER WORDS: IT IS THE MEGA DOSE OF INSULIN TAKEN TO BALANCE A
      MEGA DOSE OF CARBOHYDRATES THAT KILLS. IT IS THE DOCTOR'S FAULT
      FOR NOT TEACHING HIS PATIENTS TO AVOID THE HIGH-HIGHs WHICH
      THEN REQUIRE A HIGH DOSE OF INSULIN, TO HOPEFULLY BALANCE THE TWO.

      Yes, it's a fine line to walk, but I've been doing it for two years just fine, and I'll continue to do so. I simply check an hour after eating instead of the recommended 2 (also crazy if you ask me).

      My insulin peaks after about 90 minutes so I prevent hypoglycemia this way.

      I just really can't stand when I hear someone say "Oh well for a diabetic, 160 mg/dl two hours after eating isn't that bad."

      Really? It's terrible.

      ELLIS: I AGREE WITH YOU, AND I WON'T ASK YOU TO SUICIDE...


      Well, that's the end of my rant. Good day to you, and thanks for being realistic and rational in your chart. There's so much erroneous data in the diabetes
      community...

      Best Regards,

      Jon

      ELLIS: THANKS FOR WRITING, AND THANKS FOR YOUR SUPPORT OF MY
      OPINION. - ELLIS
    • John Q
      Hello Ellis, and everyone Quick question about the 2nd best HGH secretagogue, GHB. My question is this, why does one develop a strong urge to consume carbs
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 24, 2013
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        Hello Ellis, and everyone

        Quick question about the 2nd best HGH secretagogue, GHB.

        My question is this, why does one develop a strong urge to
        consume carbs after using GHB? Is it 1st releasing HGH, then
        insulin like growth factor, followed by a drop in blood insulin
        levels?

        I thought you would be the one to ask!

        Thanks in advance,
        -Jon


        Hello Jon... I have never taken GHB, so I don't really know the answer
        to your question.

        If GHB causes release of HGH, I don't think your IGF-1 goes up so
        fast that you would notice any change in hunger... I don't think that
        a high IGF-1 causes hunger because my IGF-1 is always very high
        (because I have injected authentic HGH almost every day, including
        today, since June, 1998) and I am not hungry because of it.

        If GHB causes a drop in blood glucose levels, (do not confuse blood
        glucose with "blood insulin levels") that would cause hunger, I suppose
        as a survival mechanism to prevent extreme hypo-glycemia.

        But I don't know that having hunger translates to craving carbs.
        When I am hungry, I don't crave carbs.

        Speaking of hypo-glycemia: Since I wrote my book of how short
        kids can grow taller, I became interested in causing hypo-glycemia,
        but also in how to prevent hypo-glycemia.

        This led me to study athletes that get hypo-glycemia... that is: endurance
        athletes.

        When you do exercise for very long periods of time, you burn up a lot of
        blood sugar. I have measured my blood glucose before a 60 minute
        aerobic exercise on an elyptical treadmill and my blood sugar dropped
        from nearly 180 to 80... 100 points in 60 minutes! (I ate horribly on
        purpose, before I did a 60 minute exercise.)

        Marathon runners and long distance bicycle riders all burn up blood
        sugar, and often get hypo-glycemia to the point that it could force them
        to drop out of their race, or at least if forces them to slow down because
        they don't have energy. So... they drink something horrible for their
        health.

        The traditional common wisdom (as they call it...) is that they drink a
        sugary carbohydrate drink which then shoots their blood sugar way up...
        and then later this crashes way down. The problem is not usually seen
        during their race, but AFTER their race.

        So... I was thinking of a way to PREVENT Hypoglycemia in endurance
        athletes, and also that it should not be horrible. Horrible, for me, means
        that they should not shoot their blood sugar way up because it will result
        in slowing them down in the long run because they will lose neurons.

        So... I will talk more about this in another post.

        - Ellis
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