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Jazz Resources Needed

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  • nyjazzmuseum
    I am completing a new jazz film, THEY DIED BEFORE 40, described on my website - http://jazzdeaths.weebly.com. I have about 600 photograph and graphic images in
    Message 1 of 14 , Aug 28, 2014
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      I am completing a new jazz film, THEY DIED BEFORE 40, described on my website - http://jazzdeaths.weebly.com.
      I have about 600 photograph and graphic images in the film and I need to identify their owners (rights holders) or whether they are in the public domain.
      I have identified between 100 and 200 of them. However, there are no more funds available to do a full search at the Library of Congress.
      If you have photos in your archives that you know are in the public domain or who the rights holders are kindly advise how I can access them.
      Any other ideas or suggestions would be appreciated.
      Howard Fischer
      212-864-1479

    • Andrew Taylor
      Hi all, I was reading the following article about the great pianist Tony Jackson, Jelly Roll s mentor, who was openly gay:
      Message 2 of 14 , Aug 28, 2014
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        Hi all,
        I was reading the following article about the great pianist Tony Jackson, Jelly Roll's mentor, who was openly gay:
        http://www.glhalloffame.org/index.pl?item=372&todo=view_item
        made me think of Sugar Johnny Smith, who was also gay.
        I was wondering if there were a number of gay musicians from New Orleans in Chicago, and if they had any kind of network.
        Can anyone think of other gay musicians from that time period in Chicago?

        Regards, Andrew

        Here's my email to that website.

        Hi,
        Great article on pianist Prof. Tony Jackson.
        I was interested that he came to Chicago in 1912 to seek greater freedom as a black gay man.
        I thought you might be interested in learning about early jazz cornetist Sugar Johnny Smith, who was (I believe) openly gay and came to Chicago in 1917.

        I've been working on a timeline of King Oliver's Chicago band, and learned  Smith came to Chicago from New Orleans in 1917 I wonder if Tony Jackson helped Smith acclimate to Chicago, and if other gay migrants (artists and otherwise) were also were mutually supportive.

        Smith died of tuberculosis at the end of 1917, and was eventually replaced by Joe Oliver, who went on to make celebrated recordings.

        Here's a picture of Smith with his Chicago band in October 1917: http://agt2.web.rice.edu/CreoleJazzBand/SJCO.png
        It was led by Lawrence Duhe but sometimes referred to as "Sugar Johnny's Creole Orchestra."  The view is that clarinetist Duhe managed the band but that Smith was the "leader" (called out the songs in performance).

        Here's a link to my KOCJB timeline:
        http://agt2.web.rice.edu/CreoleJazzBand/KOCJB.html.

      • M
        Good morning Jazzophiles! I see someone is making a jazz movie. Wondering among your photographs you might see a bassist named Rodney Richardson? He s my
        Message 3 of 14 , Aug 28, 2014
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          Good morning Jazzophiles!   I see someone is making a jazz movie.  Wondering among your photographs you might see a bassist named Rodney Richardson?  He's my dad and we have a precious, though few, performance photos of him.  He worked with many .. during the '40's he worked with Art Tatum, Erroll Garner, Basie, Billie Holiday, Lester Young, etc.  He's 6'2", a native New Orleans man, black hair, fair-skinned, and handsome.  :+)   There are a couple shots of him at the Lincoln Hotel in New York when Basie's orchestra became the first group of color to perform there. 


          On Thu, Aug 28, 2014 at 8:06 AM, hfis646942@... [RedHotJazz] <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
           




          I am completing a new jazz film, THEY DIED BEFORE 40, described on my website - http://jazzdeaths.weebly.com.
          I have about 600 photograph and graphic images in the film and I need to identify their owners (rights holders) or whether they are in the public domain.
          I have identified between 100 and 200 of them. However, there are no more funds available to do a full search at the Library of Congress.
          If you have photos in your archives that you know are in the public domain or who the rights holders are kindly advise how I can access them.
          Any other ideas or suggestions would be appreciated.
          Howard Fischer
          212-864-1479




          --
          Michele Richardson
          Central Valley Media
          CH's 14 & 26
          1064 Woodland Avenue - Suite P
          Woodland Business Park
          Modesto, CA 95351
          209.818.4477 - cell
          209.566.9135 - ofc
          * You cannot do a kindness too soon, for you never know how soon it will be too late. *
        • Richard
          From a few years later, there is Frankie Half Pint Jaxon Richard
          Message 4 of 14 , Aug 28, 2014
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            From a few years later, there is Frankie Half Pint Jaxon

            Richard

            On Aug 28, 2014, at 8:25 AM, "Andrew Taylor agt2@... [RedHotJazz]" <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

             

            Hi all,
            I was reading the following article about the great pianist Tony Jackson, Jelly Roll's mentor, who was openly gay:
            http://www.glhalloffame.org/index.pl?item=372&todo=view_item
            made me think of Sugar Johnny Smith, who was also gay.
            I was wondering if there were a number of gay musicians from New Orleans in Chicago, and if they had any kind of network.
            Can anyone think of other gay musicians from that time period in Chicago?

            Regards, Andrew

            Here's my email to that website.

            Hi,
            Great article on pianist Prof. Tony Jackson.
            I was interested that he came to Chicago in 1912 to seek greater freedom as a black gay man.
            I thought you might be interested in learning about early jazz cornetist Sugar Johnny Smith, who was (I believe) openly gay and came to Chicago in 1917.

            I've been working on a timeline of King Oliver's Chicago band, and learned  Smith came to Chicago from New Orleans in 1917 I wonder if Tony Jackson helped Smith acclimate to Chicago, and if other gay migrants (artists and otherwise) were also were mutually supportive.

            Smith died of tuberculosis at the end of 1917, and was eventually replaced by Joe Oliver, who went on to make celebrated recordings.

            Here's a picture of Smith with his Chicago band in October 1917: http://agt2.web.rice.edu/CreoleJazzBand/SJCO.png
            It was led by Lawrence Duhe but sometimes referred to as "Sugar Johnny's Creole Orchestra."  The view is that clarinetist Duhe managed the band but that Smith was the "leader" (called out the songs in performance).

            Here's a link to my KOCJB timeline:
            http://agt2.web.rice.edu/CreoleJazzBand/KOCJB.html.

          • Howard Rye
            Who wasn¹t from NOLA. Born Montgomery, AL, 3 February 1895, Kansas City, MO, 3 March 1896, or Montgomery, AL, 3 March 1897, according to which source you
            Message 5 of 14 , Aug 28, 2014
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              Re: [RedHotJazz] Gay NOLA musicians in Chicago? Who wasn’t from NOLA. Born Montgomery, AL, 3 February 1895, Kansas City, MO, 3 March 1896, or Montgomery, AL, 3 March 1897, according to which source you think most reliable. He certainly grew up in Kansas City and in any event wasn’t from NOLA.



              on 28/08/2014 18:20, red hot jazz at RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com wrote:

               
               
               
                 

              From a few years later, there is Frankie Half Pint Jaxon

              Richard

              On Aug 28, 2014, at 8:25 AM, "Andrew Taylor agt2@... [RedHotJazz]" <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                
                 

                 

              Hi all,
               I was reading the following article about the great pianist Tony Jackson, Jelly Roll's mentor, who was openly gay:
               http://www.glhalloffame.org/index.pl?item=372&todo=view_item
               made me think of Sugar Johnny Smith, who was also gay.
               I was wondering if there were a number of gay musicians from New Orleans in Chicago, and if they had any kind of network.
               Can anyone think of other gay musicians from that time period in Chicago?
               
               Regards, Andrew
               
               Here's my email to that website.
               
               
              Hi,
               Great article on pianist Prof. Tony Jackson.
               I was interested that he came to Chicago in 1912 to seek greater freedom as a black gay man.
               I thought you might be interested in learning about early jazz cornetist Sugar Johnny Smith, who was (I believe) openly gay and came to Chicago in 1917.
               
               I've been working on a timeline of King Oliver's Chicago band, and learned  Smith came to Chicago from New Orleans in 1917 I wonder if Tony Jackson helped Smith acclimate to Chicago, and if other gay migrants (artists and otherwise) were also were mutually supportive.
               
               Smith died of tuberculosis at the end of 1917, and was eventually replaced by Joe Oliver, who went on to make celebrated recordings.
               
               Here's a picture of Smith with his Chicago band in October 1917: http://agt2.web.rice.edu/CreoleJazzBand/SJCO.png.  
               It was led by Lawrence Duhe but sometimes referred to as "Sugar Johnny's Creole Orchestra."  The view is that clarinetist Duhe managed the band but that Smith was the "leader" (called out the songs in performance).
               
               Here's a link to my KOCJB timeline:
               http://agt2.web.rice.edu/CreoleJazzBand/KOCJB.html.
               

               
               

               
                

                 



              Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
              howard@...
              Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098

            • Richard
              You re right. I was thinking you were asking about gay musicians in Chicago, not just the ones who came from New Orleans. I misread the post Richard ...
              Message 6 of 14 , Aug 28, 2014
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                You're right. I was thinking you were asking about gay musicians in Chicago, not just the ones who came from New Orleans.  I misread the post

                Richard

                On Aug 28, 2014, at 11:26 AM, "Howard Rye howard@... [RedHotJazz]" <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                 

                Who wasn’t from NOLA. Born Montgomery, AL, 3 February 1895, Kansas City, MO, 3 March 1896, or Montgomery, AL, 3 March 1897, according to which source you think most reliable. He certainly grew up in Kansas City and in any event wasn’t from NOLA.



                on 28/08/2014 18:20, red hot jazz at RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com wrote:

                 
                 
                 
                   

                From a few years later, there is Frankie Half Pint Jaxon

                Richard

                On Aug 28, 2014, at 8:25 AM, "Andrew Taylor agt2@... [RedHotJazz]" <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                  
                   

                   

                Hi all,
                 I was reading the following article about the great pianist Tony Jackson, Jelly Roll's mentor, who was openly gay:
                 http://www.glhalloffame.org/index.pl?item=372&todo=view_item
                 made me think of Sugar Johnny Smith, who was also gay.
                 I was wondering if there were a number of gay musicians from New Orleans in Chicago, and if they had any kind of network.
                 Can anyone think of other gay musicians from that time period in Chicago?
                 
                 Regards, Andrew
                 
                 Here's my email to that website.
                 
                 
                Hi,
                 Great article on pianist Prof. Tony Jackson.
                 I was interested that he came to Chicago in 1912 to seek greater freedom as a black gay man.
                 I thought you might be interested in learning about early jazz cornetist Sugar Johnny Smith, who was (I believe) openly gay and came to Chicago in 1917.
                 
                 I've been working on a timeline of King Oliver's Chicago band, and learned  Smith came to Chicago from New Orleans in 1917 I wonder if Tony Jackson helped Smith acclimate to Chicago, and if other gay migrants (artists and otherwise) were also were mutually supportive.
                 
                 Smith died of tuberculosis at the end of 1917, and was eventually replaced by Joe Oliver, who went on to make celebrated recordings.
                 
                 Here's a picture of Smith with his Chicago band in October 1917: http://agt2.web.rice.edu/CreoleJazzBand/SJCO.png.  
                 It was led by Lawrence Duhe but sometimes referred to as "Sugar Johnny's Creole Orchestra."  The view is that clarinetist Duhe managed the band but that Smith was the "leader" (called out the songs in performance).
                 
                 Here's a link to my KOCJB timeline:
                 http://agt2.web.rice.edu/CreoleJazzBand/KOCJB.html.
                 

                 
                 

                 
                  

                   



                Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
                howard@...
                Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098

              • Andrew Taylor
                Hi Richard, I did write NOLA, but t s probably more interesting to consider all gay artists who moved to Chicago (from the South?) during the period rather
                Message 7 of 14 , Aug 28, 2014
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                  Hi Richard,
                  I did write NOLA, but t's probably more interesting to consider all gay artists who moved to Chicago (from the South?) during the period rather than just thinking of New Orleans.

                  I'm fairly ignorant about how one would research this, with regards to correspondence or relevant publications from the era. 

                  I'm probably not going to explore it too much but I think it's interesting, especially given that musicians are generally a disreputable "marginal population" (in the view of many).

                  I kind of got the sense that homophobia in Jazz got stronger later, read this article:
                  http://jazztimes.com/articles/20073-homophobia-in-jazz

                  If I find anything good on this in JSTOR articles I'll post a link.
                  Regards,
                  Andrew

                  On 8/28/2014 1:49 PM, Richard rfannan1@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:
                   
                  You're right. I was thinking you were asking about gay musicians in Chicago, not just the ones who came from New Orleans.  I misread the post

                  Richard

                  On Aug 28, 2014, at 11:26 AM, "Howard Rye howard@... [RedHotJazz]" <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                   

                  Who wasn’t from NOLA. Born Montgomery, AL, 3 February 1895, Kansas City, MO, 3 March 1896, or Montgomery, AL, 3 March 1897, according to which source you think most reliable. He certainly grew up in Kansas City and in any event wasn’t from NOLA.



                  on 28/08/2014 18:20, red hot jazz at RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com wrote:

                   
                   
                   
                     

                  From a few years later, there is Frankie Half Pint Jaxon

                  Richard

                  On Aug 28, 2014, at 8:25 AM, "Andrew Taylor agt2@... [RedHotJazz]" <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                    
                     

                     

                  Hi all,
                   I was reading the following article about the great pianist Tony Jackson, Jelly Roll's mentor, who was openly gay:
                   http://www.glhalloffame.org/index.pl?item=372&todo=view_item
                   made me think of Sugar Johnny Smith, who was also gay.
                   I was wondering if there were a number of gay musicians from New Orleans in Chicago, and if they had any kind of network.
                   Can anyone think of other gay musicians from that time period in Chicago?
                   
                   Regards, Andrew
                   
                   Here's my email to that website.
                   
                   
                  Hi,
                   Great article on pianist Prof. Tony Jackson.
                   I was interested that he came to Chicago in 1912 to seek greater freedom as a black gay man.
                   I thought you might be interested in learning about early jazz cornetist Sugar Johnny Smith, who was (I believe) openly gay and came to Chicago in 1917.
                   
                   I've been working on a timeline of King Oliver's Chicago band, and learned  Smith came to Chicago from New Orleans in 1917 I wonder if Tony Jackson helped Smith acclimate to Chicago, and if other gay migrants (artists and otherwise) were also were mutually supportive.
                   
                   Smith died of tuberculosis at the end of 1917, and was eventually replaced by Joe Oliver, who went on to make celebrated recordings.
                   
                   Here's a picture of Smith with his Chicago band in October 1917: http://agt2.web.rice.edu/CreoleJazzBand/SJCO.png.  
                   It was led by Lawrence Duhe but sometimes referred to as "Sugar Johnny's Creole Orchestra."  The view is that clarinetist Duhe managed the band but that Smith was the "leader" (called out the songs in performance).
                   
                   Here's a link to my KOCJB timeline:
                   http://agt2.web.rice.edu/CreoleJazzBand/KOCJB.html.
                   

                   
                   

                   
                    

                     



                  Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
                  howard@...
                  Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098



                  -- 
                  Andrew Taylor, MLS
                  Associate Curator, Visual Resources
                  Department of Art History, Rice University
                  713-348-4836
                  https://twitter.com/agrahamt
                • Howard Rye
                  Just for the record, it wasn¹t me that was asking, but this new system of having posts come from the group makes it impossible to tell. ... Howard Rye, 20
                  Message 8 of 14 , Aug 28, 2014
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                    Re: [RedHotJazz] Gay NOLA musicians in Chicago? Just for the record, it wasn’t me that was asking, but this new system of having posts come from the group makes it impossible to tell.




                    on 28/08/2014 19:49, red hot jazz at RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com wrote:

                     
                     
                     
                       

                    You're right. I was thinking you were asking about gay musicians in Chicago, not just the ones who came from New Orleans.  I misread the post

                    Richard

                    On Aug 28, 2014, at 11:26 AM, "Howard Rye howard@... [RedHotJazz]" <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                      
                       

                    Who wasn’t from NOLA. Born Montgomery, AL, 3 February 1895, Kansas City, MO, 3 March 1896, or Montgomery, AL, 3 March 1897, according to which source you think most reliable. He certainly grew up in Kansas City and in any event wasn’t from NOLA.



                    on 28/08/2014 18:20, red hot jazz at RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com wrote:

                     
                     
                     
                       

                    From a few years later, there is Frankie Half Pint Jaxon

                    Richard

                    On Aug 28, 2014, at 8:25 AM, "Andrew Taylor agt2@... [RedHotJazz]" <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                      
                       

                       

                    Hi all,
                     I was reading the following article about the great pianist Tony Jackson, Jelly Roll's mentor, who was openly gay:
                     http://www.glhalloffame.org/index.pl?item=372&todo=view_item
                     made me think of Sugar Johnny Smith, who was also gay.
                     I was wondering if there were a number of gay musicians from New Orleans in Chicago, and if they had any kind of network.
                     Can anyone think of other gay musicians from that time period in Chicago?
                     
                     Regards, Andrew
                     
                     Here's my email to that website.
                     
                     
                    Hi,
                     Great article on pianist Prof. Tony Jackson.
                     I was interested that he came to Chicago in 1912 to seek greater freedom as a black gay man.
                     I thought you might be interested in learning about early jazz cornetist Sugar Johnny Smith, who was (I believe) openly gay and came to Chicago in 1917.
                     
                     I've been working on a timeline of King Oliver's Chicago band, and learned  Smith came to Chicago from New Orleans in 1917 I wonder if Tony Jackson helped Smith acclimate to Chicago, and if other gay migrants (artists and otherwise) were also were mutually supportive.
                     
                     Smith died of tuberculosis at the end of 1917, and was eventually replaced by Joe Oliver, who went on to make celebrated recordings.
                     
                     Here's a picture of Smith with his Chicago band in October 1917: http://agt2.web.rice.edu/CreoleJazzBand/SJCO.png.  
                     It was led by Lawrence Duhe but sometimes referred to as "Sugar Johnny's Creole Orchestra."  The view is that clarinetist Duhe managed the band but that Smith was the "leader" (called out the songs in performance).
                     
                     Here's a link to my KOCJB timeline:
                     http://agt2.web.rice.edu/CreoleJazzBand/KOCJB.html.
                     

                     
                     

                     
                      

                       



                    Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
                    howard@...
                    Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098


                     
                      

                       



                    Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
                    howard@...
                    Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098

                  • Ron L'Herault
                    Is it Chicago that is more tolerant or just that musicians/artists tend to be more tolerant? Ron L From: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
                    Message 9 of 14 , Aug 28, 2014
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                      Is it Chicago that is more tolerant or just that musicians/artists tend to be more tolerant? 

                       

                      Ron L

                       

                      From: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com [mailto:RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com]
                      Sent: Thursday, August 28, 2014 3:02 PM
                      To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Gay NOLA musicians in Chicago?

                       




                      Hi Richard,
                      I did write NOLA, but t's probably more interesting to consider all gay artists who moved to Chicago (from the South?) during the period rather than just thinking of New Orleans.

                      I'm fairly ignorant about how one would research this, with regards to correspondence or relevant publications from the era. 

                      I'm probably not going to explore it too much but I think it's interesting, especially given that musicians are generally a disreputable "marginal population" (in the view of many).

                      I kind of got the sense that homophobia in Jazz got stronger later, read this article:
                      http://jazztimes.com/articles/20073-homophobia-in-jazz

                      If I find anything good on this in JSTOR articles I'll post a link.
                      Regards,
                      Andrew

                      On 8/28/2014 1:49 PM, Richard rfannan1@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:

                       

                      You're right. I was thinking you were asking about gay musicians in Chicago, not just the ones who came from New Orleans.  I misread the post

                      Richard


                      On Aug 28, 2014, at 11:26 AM, "Howard Rye howard@... [RedHotJazz]" <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                       

                      Who wasn’t from NOLA. Born Montgomery, AL, 3 February 1895, Kansas City, MO, 3 March 1896, or Montgomery, AL, 3 March 1897, according to which source you think most reliable. He certainly grew up in Kansas City and in any event wasn’t from NOLA.



                      on 28/08/2014 18:20, red hot jazz at RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com wrote:

                       
                       
                       
                         

                      From a few years later, there is Frankie Half Pint Jaxon

                      Richard

                      On Aug 28, 2014, at 8:25 AM, "Andrew Taylor agt2@... [RedHotJazz]" <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                        
                         

                         

                      Hi all,
                       I was reading the following article about the great pianist Tony Jackson, Jelly Roll's mentor, who was openly gay:
                       http://www.glhalloffame.org/index.pl?item=372&todo=view_item
                       made me think of Sugar Johnny Smith, who was also gay.
                       I was wondering if there were a number of gay musicians from New Orleans in Chicago, and if they had any kind of network.
                       Can anyone think of other gay musicians from that time period in Chicago?
                       
                       Regards, Andrew
                       
                       Here's my email to that website.
                       
                       

                      Hi,
                       Great article on pianist Prof. Tony Jackson.
                       I was interested that he came to Chicago in 1912 to seek greater freedom as a black gay man.
                       I thought you might be interested in learning about early jazz cornetist Sugar Johnny Smith, who was (I believe) openly gay and came to Chicago in 1917.
                       
                       I've been working on a timeline of King Oliver's Chicago band, and learned  Smith came to Chicago from New Orleans in 1917 I wonder if Tony Jackson helped Smith acclimate to Chicago, and if other gay migrants (artists and otherwise) were also were mutually supportive.
                       
                       Smith died of tuberculosis at the end of 1917, and was eventually replaced by Joe Oliver, who went on to make celebrated recordings.
                       
                       Here's a picture of Smith with his Chicago band in October 1917: http://agt2.web.rice.edu/CreoleJazzBand/SJCO.png.  
                       It was led by Lawrence Duhe but sometimes referred to as "Sugar Johnny's Creole Orchestra."  The view is that clarinetist Duhe managed the band but that Smith was the "leader" (called out the songs in performance).
                       
                       Here's a link to my KOCJB timeline:
                       http://agt2.web.rice.edu/CreoleJazzBand/KOCJB.html.
                       


                       
                       

                       
                        


                         


                      Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
                      howard@...
                      Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098




                      -- 
                      Andrew Taylor, MLS
                      Associate Curator, Visual Resources
                      Department of Art History, Rice University
                      713-348-4836
                      https://twitter.com/agrahamt




                    • Slater, JP
                      Was Frankie Jaxon gay? I know he worked as a female impersonator, but I don t recall seeing anything that mentioned his sexual preference. JP Slater
                      Message 10 of 14 , Aug 29, 2014
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                        Was Frankie Jaxon gay? I know he worked as a female impersonator, but I don’t recall seeing anything that mentioned his sexual preference.

                         

                         

                        JP Slater

                      • Patrice Champarou
                        From: mailto:RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, August 29, 2014 4:37 PM To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com Subject: [RedHotJazz] Re: Gay NOLA musicians in
                        Message 11 of 14 , Aug 29, 2014
                        • 0 Attachment
                           
                           
                          Sent: Friday, August 29, 2014 4:37 PM
                          Subject: [RedHotJazz] Re: Gay NOLA musicians in Chicago?
                           


                          > Was

                          Frankie Jaxon gay? I know he worked as a female impersonator, but I don’t recall seeing anything that mentioned his sexual preference.

                          This is the very question I was about to ask, before wondering what difference it would make anyway ;) Talent is one thing, private life another... well, mostly, I think. I remember one Bessie Smith fan requesting to join the group years ago, only to have expert confirmation that she was a lesbian... pity there is no English for “bof!”

                          P.

                        • Richard Fannan
                          Although I had always heard it said that he was a female impersonator and gay, it may be that neither was the case
                          Message 12 of 14 , Aug 29, 2014
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                            Although I had always heard it said that he was a female impersonator and gay, it may be that neither was the case



                            And, of course, it wouldn’t make any difference but the original question was whether there were gay musicians from New Orleans, like Tony Jackson, who may have moved to Chicago because it was more hospitable to gays which seems to me to be a legitimate question about jazz culture.


                            On Aug 29, 2014, at 7:49 AM, 'Patrice Champarou' patrice.champarou@... [RedHotJazz] <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                             
                             
                            Sent: Friday, August 29, 2014 4:37 PM
                            Subject: [RedHotJazz] Re: Gay NOLA musicians in Chicago?
                             


                            > Was Frankie Jaxon gay? I know he worked as a female impersonator, but I don’t recall seeing anything that mentioned his sexual preference.

                            This is the very question I was about to ask, before wondering what difference it would make anyway ;) Talent is one thing, private life another... well, mostly, I think. I remember one Bessie Smith fan requesting to join the group years ago, only to have expert confirmation that she was a lesbian... pity there is no English for “bof!”

                            P.



                          • alan504450
                            Personally I couldn t care less - as always I m only here for the jazz and nothing else is important. TTFN - 007 ... From: Richard Fannan rfannan1@gmail.com
                            Message 13 of 14 , Aug 30, 2014
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                              Personally I couldn't care less - as always I'm only here for the jazz and nothing else is important.
                              TTFN - 007



                              -----Original Message-----
                              From: Richard Fannan rfannan1@... [RedHotJazz] <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
                              To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Sat, 30 Aug 2014 3:47
                              Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: Gay NOLA musicians in Chicago?

                               
                              Although I had always heard it said that he was a female impersonator and gay, it may be that neither was the case



                              And, of course, it wouldn’t make any difference but the original question was whether there were gay musicians from New Orleans, like Tony Jackson, who may have moved to Chicago because it was more hospitable to gays which seems to me to be a legitimate question about jazz culture.


                              On Aug 29, 2014, at 7:49 AM, 'Patrice Champarou' patrice.champarou@... [RedHotJazz] <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                               
                               
                              Sent: Friday, August 29, 2014 4:37 PM
                              Subject: [RedHotJazz] Re: Gay NOLA musicians in Chicago?
                               


                              > Was Frankie Jaxon gay? I know he worked as a female impersonator, but I don’t recall seeing anything that mentioned his sexual preference.
                              This is the very question I was about to ask, before wondering what difference it would make anyway ;) Talent is one thing, private life another... well, mostly, I think. I remember one Bessie Smith fan requesting to join the group years ago, only to have expert confirmation that she was a lesbian... pity there is no English for “bof!”
                              P.


                            • Slater, JP
                              Of course it makes no difference weather Frankie was or wasn t. I was just asking. (I did read somewhere that his friends always called him Frankie. Half-Pint
                              Message 14 of 14 , Sep 2, 2014
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                                Of course it makes no difference weather Frankie was or wasn’t. I was just asking. (I did read somewhere that his friends always called him Frankie. Half-Pint was strictly a nickname that promoters used.)

                                 

                                JP Slater

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