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Legendary Lonnie Johnson

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  • malo1956_2002
    Between 1925 and 1932, the legendary Lonnie Johnson made about 130 recordings for the Okeh label (many were good sellers). He was called to New York to record
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 16, 2014
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      Between 1925 and 1932, the legendary Lonnie Johnson made about 130 recordings for the Okeh label (many were good sellers). He was called to New York to record with the leading blues singers of the day including Victoria Spivey and country blues singer Alger "Texas" Alexander. He also toured with Bessie Smith's T.O.B.A. show.
      In December 1927, Johnson recorded in Chicago as a guest artist with Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five, paired with banjoist Johnny St. Cyr. He played on the sides "I'm Not Rough", "Savoy Blues", and "Hotter Than That." In 1928 he recorded "Hot and Bothered", "Move Over", and "The Mooche" with Duke Ellington on Okeh Records; he also recorded with a group called The Chocolate Dandies (in this case, McKinney's Cotton Pickers). He pioneered the guitar solo on the 1927 track "6/88 Glide"[6] and many of his early recordings showed him playing 12-string guitar solos in a style that influenced such future jazz guitarists as Charlie Christian and Django Reinhardt, and gave the instrument new meaning as a jazz voice. He excelled in purely instrumental pieces, some of which he recorded with the white jazz guitarist Eddie Lang, whom he teamed up with in 1929. These recordings were among the first in history to feature black and white musicians performing together, but Lang was credited as Blind Willie Dunn to disguise the fact....Now here's the real kicker....Of the forty ads for his records that appeared in the 'Chicago Defender' between 1926 and 1931, not one even mentioned that he played guitar.....

    • Patrice Champarou
      Athough not mentioned in Rust index, Lonnie also appears in Elllington’s Misty Morning (Nov. 1928) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NReQCLyCXOo now, shall I
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 16, 2014
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        Athough not mentioned in Rust index, Lonnie also appears in Elllington’s Misty Morning (Nov. 1928) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NReQCLyCXOo now, shall I allow HTML features so that this groups looks a bit more up to date ?
         
        Sent: Saturday, August 16, 2014 12:14 PM
        Subject: [RedHotJazz] Legendary Lonnie Johnson
         


        Between 1925 and 1932, the legendary Lonnie Johnson made about 130 recordings for the Okeh label (many were good sellers). He was called to New York to record with the leading blues singers of the day including Victoria Spivey and country blues singer Alger "Texas" Alexander. He also toured with Bessie Smith's T.O.B.A. show.
        In December 1927, Johnson recorded in Chicago as a guest artist with Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five, paired with banjoist Johnny St. Cyr. He played on the sides "I'm Not Rough", "Savoy Blues", and "Hotter Than That." In 1928 he recorded "Hot and Bothered", "Move Over", and "The Mooche" with Duke Ellington on Okeh Records; he also recorded with a group called The Chocolate Dandies (in this case, McKinney's Cotton Pickers). He pioneered the guitar solo on the 1927 track "6/88 Glide"[6] and many of his early recordings showed him playing 12-string guitar solos in a style that influenced such future jazz guitarists as Charlie Christian and Django Reinhardt, and gave the instrument new meaning as a jazz voice. He excelled in purely instrumental pieces, some of which he recorded with the white jazz guitarist Eddie Lang, whom he teamed up with in 1929. These recordings were among the first in history to feature black and white musicians performing together, but Lang was credited as Blind Willie Dunn to disguise the fact....Now here's the real kicker....Of the forty ads for his records that appeared in the 'Chicago Defender' between 1926 and 1931, not one even mentioned that he played guitar.....

      • John McCusker
        Among the first records to feature black and white musicians playing together? Not really. Polk Miller and the Old South Quartette made records in the 1890s
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 16, 2014
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          Among the first records to feature black and white musicians playing together? Not really. Polk Miller and the Old South Quartette made records in the 1890s and Achille Baquet recorded with Jimmy Durante's band in 1919. Jelly Roll Morton recorded with the New Orleans Rhythm Kings in 1922 or 23.
          John McCusker
          New Orleans


          On Saturday, August 16, 2014 6:17 AM, "'Patrice Champarou' patrice.champarou@... [RedHotJazz]" <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


           
          Athough not mentioned in Rust index, Lonnie also appears in Elllington’s Misty Morning (Nov. 1928) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NReQCLyCXOo now, shall I allow HTML features so that this groups looks a bit more up to date ?
           
          Sent: Saturday, August 16, 2014 12:14 PM
          Subject: [RedHotJazz] Legendary Lonnie Johnson
           


          Between 1925 and 1932, the legendary Lonnie Johnson made about 130 recordings for the Okeh label (many were good sellers). He was called to New York to record with the leading blues singers of the day including Victoria Spivey and country blues singer Alger "Texas" Alexander. He also toured with Bessie Smith's T.O.B.A. show.
          In December 1927, Johnson recorded in Chicago as a guest artist with Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five, paired with banjoist Johnny St. Cyr. He played on the sides "I'm Not Rough", "Savoy Blues", and "Hotter Than That." In 1928 he recorded "Hot and Bothered", "Move Over", and "The Mooche" with Duke Ellington on Okeh Records; he also recorded with a group called The Chocolate Dandies (in this case, McKinney's Cotton Pickers). He pioneered the guitar solo on the 1927 track "6/88 Glide"[6] and many of his early recordings showed him playing 12-string guitar solos in a style that influenced such future jazz guitarists as Charlie Christian and Django Reinhardt, and gave the instrument new meaning as a jazz voice. He excelled in purely instrumental pieces, some of which he recorded with the white jazz guitarist Eddie Lang, whom he teamed up with in 1929. These recordings were among the first in history to feature black and white musicians performing together, but Lang was credited as Blind Willie Dunn to disguise the fact....Now here's the real kicker....Of the forty ads for his records that appeared in the 'Chicago Defender' between 1926 and 1931, not one even mentioned that he played guitar.....


        • Kim Altsund
          Don´t miss the new great book on Lonnie Johnson: The Original Guitar Hero by Dean Alger (University of North Texas Press). /Kim On Sat, 16 Aug 2014 13:17:32
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 16, 2014
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            Don´t miss the new great book on Lonnie Johnson: The Original Guitar Hero by Dean Alger (University of North Texas Press).  /Kim

            On Sat, 16 Aug 2014 13:17:32 +0200
            "'Patrice Champarou' patrice.champarou@... [RedHotJazz]" wrote:
            > Athough not mentioned in Rust index, Lonnie also appears
            >in Elllington’s Misty Morning (Nov.
            1928)
            >http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NReQCLyCXOo now, shall I
            >allow HTML features so that this groups
            looks a bit more
            >up to date ?
            >
            >From: mailto:RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Saturday,
            August 16, 2014 12:14 PM
            > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: [RedHotJazz] Legendary Lonnie
            Johnson
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Between 1925 and 1932, the legendary Lonnie Johnson made
            >about 130 recordings for the Okeh label (many were good
            >sellers). He was called to New York to record
            with the
            >leading blues singers of the day including Victoria
            >Spivey and country blues singer Alger
            "Texas" Alexander.
            >He also toured with Bessie Smith's T.O.B.A. show.
            > In December 1927, Johnson recorded
            in Chicago as a guest
            >artist with Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five, paired with
            >banjoist Johnny St. Cyr.
            He played on the sides "I'm Not
            >Rough", "Savoy Blues", and "Hotter Than That." In 1928 he
            >recorded "Hot
            and Bothered", "Move Over", and "The
            >Mooche" with Duke Ellington on Okeh Records; he also
            >recorded with
            a group called The Chocolate Dandies (in
            >this case, McKinney's Cotton Pickers). He pioneered the
            >guitar
            solo on the 1927 track "6/88 Glide"[6] and many of
            >his early recordings showed him playing 12-string guitar
            >solos in a style that influenced such future jazz
            >guitarists as Charlie Christian and Django Reinhardt,
            and
            >gave the instrument new meaning as a jazz voice. He
            >excelled in purely instrumental pieces, some of
            which he
            >recorded with the white jazz guitarist Eddie Lang, whom
            >he teamed up with in 1929. These
            recordings were among
            >the first in history to feature black and white musicians
            >performing together, but
            Lang was credited as Blind
            >Willie Dunn to disguise the fact....Now here's the real
            >kicker....Of the
            forty ads for his records that appeared
            >in the 'Chicago Defender' between 1926 and 1931, not one
            >even
            mentioned that he played guitar.....
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >

          • Ron L'Herault
            Sure, as long as you are moderating and continue to be successful at catching spammers/phishers etc. Ron L From: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
            Message 5 of 5 , Aug 16, 2014
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              Sure, as long as you are moderating and continue to be successful at catching spammers/phishers etc.

               

              Ron L

               

              From: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com [mailto:RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com]
              Sent: Saturday, August 16, 2014 7:18 AM
              To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Legendary Lonnie Johnson

               




              Athough not mentioned in Rust index, Lonnie also appears in Elllington’s Misty Morning (Nov. 1928) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NReQCLyCXOo now, shall I allow HTML features so that this groups looks a bit more up to date ?

               

              Sent: Saturday, August 16, 2014 12:14 PM

              Subject: [RedHotJazz] Legendary Lonnie Johnson

               




              Between 1925 and 1932, the legendary Lonnie Johnson made about 130 recordings for the Okeh label (many were good sellers). He was called to New York to record with the leading blues singers of the day including Victoria Spivey and country blues singer Alger "Texas" Alexander. He also toured with Bessie Smith's T.O.B.A. show.
              In December 1927, Johnson recorded in Chicago as a guest artist with Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five, paired with banjoist Johnny St. Cyr. He played on the sides "I'm Not Rough", "Savoy Blues", and "Hotter Than That." In 1928 he recorded "Hot and Bothered", "Move Over", and "The Mooche" with Duke Ellington on Okeh Records; he also recorded with a group called The Chocolate Dandies (in this case, McKinney's Cotton Pickers). He pioneered the guitar solo on the 1927 track "6/88 Glide"[6] and many of his early recordings showed him playing 12-string guitar solos in a style that influenced such future jazz guitarists as Charlie Christian and Django Reinhardt, and gave the instrument new meaning as a jazz voice. He excelled in purely instrumental pieces, some of which he recorded with the white jazz guitarist Eddie Lang, whom he teamed up with in 1929. These recordings were among the first in history to feature black and white musicians performing together, but Lang was credited as Blind Willie Dunn to disguise the fact....Now here's the real kicker....Of the forty ads for his records that appeared in the 'Chicago Defender' between 1926 and 1931, not one even mentioned that he played guitar.....




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