Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Ken Colyer was Oooooooooh Yeeeeukkkkkk!!!!

Expand Messages
  • David Brown
    Ken Colyer was the greatest New Orleans jazz musician not to have been born in that city. He visited N.O. as a young man and thereafter pursued an evangelical
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 20 12:53 AM
      Ken Colyer was the greatest New Orleans jazz musician not to have been born in that city.

      He visited N.O. as a young man and thereafter pursued an evangelical crusade to play the music he heard there. If that is limited ?

      He never compromised nor jumped on the trad bandwagon.

      He himself was one the finest, most original and lyrical N.O. trumpeters.

      He was often forced to play with musicians who were not fit to sweep up his rollie butts.


      Dave


      alan.bond@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:
       

      Ken Colyer had some good bands and some dire ones. Too much baggage from the time spent in NO limited his approach.
      TTFN - 007




      -

    • John Schott
      No one forced him to do anything. Don’t demean people for rhetorical flourish. John From: mailto:RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, June 20, 2014 12:53
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 20 1:40 AM
        No one forced him to do anything. Don’t demean people for rhetorical flourish.
         
        John
         
        Sent: Friday, June 20, 2014 12:53 AM
        Subject: [RedHotJazz] Ken Colyer was Oooooooooh Yeeeeukkkkkk!!!!

        He was often forced to play with musicians who were not fit to sweep up his rollie butts.

        Dave

      • Roger Strong
        Well I am a keen Ken Colyer collector but even so I hear his considerable limitations as a trumpeter which are all too evident at times. His talent was in
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 20 1:55 AM
             Well I am a keen Ken Colyer collector but even so I hear his considerable limitations as a trumpeter which are all too evident at times. His talent was in creating an
          ensemble sound-but not every one hears that. His output as I have collected it is certainly pretty viable from absolutely marvellous to below par. I would imagine that it
          was quite difficult to play with him at times. And I do realise that illness dogged his later years.
           
          Roger
           
          Sent: Friday, June 20, 2014 7:53 PM
          Subject: [RedHotJazz] Ken Colyer was Oooooooooh Yeeeeukkkkkk!!!!
           
           

          Ken Colyer was the greatest New Orleans jazz musician not to have been born in that city.

          He visited N.O. as a young man and thereafter pursued an evangelical crusade to play the music he heard there. If that is limited ?

          He never compromised nor jumped on the trad bandwagon.

          He himself was one the finest, most original and lyrical N.O. trumpeters.

          He was often forced to play with musicians who were not fit to sweep up his rollie butts.


          Dave


          alan.bond@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:

           

          Ken Colyer had some good bands and some dire ones. Too much baggage from the time spent in NO limited his approach.
          TTFN - 007

           
           
           
          -

        • alan504450
          Ken was a crusader for New Orleans jazz as he heard it in New Orleans in 1950. This was not the New Orleans jazz that the majority of musicians either played
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 20 1:59 AM
            Ken was a crusader for New Orleans jazz as he heard it in New Orleans in 1950. This was not the New Orleans jazz that the majority of musicians either played or heard in the 1920s. Had it been so, the Colyer band would have had a line up similar to that of Sam Morgan or Oscar Celestin. Far too many of Colyer's bands sounded tired and dispirited but not because Ken was a poor musician - he was a very good trumpet player but he allowed himself to become hidebound to 'the sound'. I saw the Colyer band live in the embankment gardens in about 1957 and Ian Wheeler and Mac Duncan were in the lineup and it was a cracking session. There were other occasions when the band sounded so tired as to be depressing and large chunks of the audience left early. My very dear friend the late Brian Chadwick played with Ken on occasion and even he felt the depression at times. It was regrettable, but similar in a way to the Mick Mulligan band which could be brilliant one and night and as ragged as a tatty pair of trousers on another. Why it happens is another story but it certainly wasn't down to bad musicianship on the part of Ken Colyer.
            TTFN - 007

            -----Original Message-----
            From: David Brown johnhaleysims@... [RedHotJazz] <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
            To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Fri, 20 Jun 2014 8:53
            Subject: [RedHotJazz] Ken Colyer was Oooooooooh Yeeeeukkkkkk!!!!

             
            Ken Colyer was the greatest New Orleans jazz musician not to have been born in that city.

            He visited N.O. as a young man and thereafter pursued an evangelical crusade to play the music he heard there. If that is limited ?

            He never compromised nor jumped on the trad bandwagon.

            He himself was one the finest, most original and lyrical N.O. trumpeters.

            He was often forced to play with musicians who were not fit to sweep up his rollie butts.


            Dave


            alan.bond@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:
             
            Ken Colyer had some good bands and some dire ones. Too much baggage from the time spent in NO limited his approach.
            TTFN - 007



            -

            .
          • David Brown
            The music of N.O. in the 40s was as valid as that of the 20s. It was still a functional music of black & white N.O. Post Revival, the music of N.O. became
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 20 2:43 AM
              The music of N.O. in the 40s was as valid as that of the 20s. It was still a functional music of black & white N.O. Post Revival, the music of N.O. became frozen in imposed archaism.

              Ken chose to emulate contemporary N.O. music whereas the other wing of the revival went back to the 'classic' records.

              No way was Ken a player of infinite variety and his illness later restricted his range. But I could claim that later Ken can be the best because he had to make up with subtlety what he lacked in power.

              And yes, there was a treadmill quality about some sessions with their long, long versions of  the same limited repertoire.


              Dave




              alan.bond@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:
               

              Ken was a crusader for New Orleans jazz as he heard it in New Orleans in 1950. This was not the New Orleans jazz that the majority of musicians either played or heard in the 1920s. Had it been so, the Colyer band would have had a line up similar to that of Sam Morgan or Oscar Celestin. Far too many of Colyer's bands sounded tired and dispirited but not because Ken was a poor musician - he was a very good trumpet player but he allowed himself to become hidebound to 'the sound'. I saw the Colyer band live in the embankment gardens in about 1957 and Ian Wheeler and Mac Duncan were in the lineup and it was a cracking session. There were other occasions when the band sounded so tired as to be depressing and large chunks of the audience left early. My very dear friend the late Brian Chadwick played with Ken on occasion and even he felt the depression at times. It was regrettable, but similar in a way to the Mick Mulligan band which could be brilliant one and night and as ragged as a tatty pair of trousers on another. Why it happens is another story but it certainly wasn't down to bad musicianship on the part of Ken Colyer.
              TTFN - 007


              'Roger Strong' roger@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:

              >
              >  Well I am a keen Ken Colyer collector but even so I hear his considerable limitations as a trumpeter which are all too evident at times. His talent was in creating an
              > ensemble sound-but not every one hears that. His output as I have collected it is certainly pretty viable from absolutely marvellous to below par. I would imagine that it
              > was quite difficult to play with him at times. And I do realise that illness dogged his later years.



            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.