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R: Re: R: Re: [RedHotJazz] What a shame to be so lo-tech

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  • levi.marco@libero.it
    Oh yes Peter, the Swing Era is so called because the jazz of that time emphasized this important element of jazz music, possibly the more important (It don t
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 17, 2014

      Oh yes Peter, the "Swing Era" is so called because the jazz of that time emphasized this important element of jazz music, possibly the more important (It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing...Ipse Duke Dixit!). Swing is not only related to jazz and the modern era. J.S Bach is the most beloved classical musician among the jazzmen that love his stunning scales, harmonies and his rhythms containing lots of  implicit and explicit swing.  They sometimes love to explore the Bach's music in a jazzy way (I remember the "Swingle Singers" from France, f.e.). And what about Domenico Scarlatti? The first time I listened to some of his harpsichord sonatas I told myself: Oh my God, that's bossa nova! Many years later I read a monography on this musician where my opinion was confirmed and explained with his stage at the Portuguese Court. You can easily imagine why that is related to some Scarlatti's south american influence (how much swing in samba, bossa nova etc!)

      Just a little highlight: 1917 is not the year when jazz was born but only the year when the first known jazz record was released. So the ODJB was the first Band to record  this music but not the only one to play it at the time.The rarely quoted " Wilbur Sweatman's Original Jass band" was already active in 1917/18 and this orchestra has nothing to envy to the O.D.J.B.

      Marco


      ----Messaggio originale----
      Da: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
      Data: 17/06/2014 20.23
      A: <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
      Ogg: Re: R: Re: [RedHotJazz] What a shame to be so lo-tech

       

      One other thing about the "swing era"--(I just gotta chime in here, even though I'm likely preaching to the choir.) Whenever I use the word "swing" with people, they say, "Oh, you mean the swing era, and big bands." Even musicians I know have no idea that "swing" in jazz is an action, not a style. Before it is a noun or adjective, it is a verb. Some American music was swinging even before 1900. 


      To my mind, this heartbeat of American music, coming as it did from work song, brass bands, and the sanctified church, is the "active ingredient" in all jazz styles--the river than runs through.

      PG
      On Jun 17, 2014, at 1:33 PM, David Brown johnhaleysims@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:


       
    • levi.marco@libero.it
      P.S. I know that bossa nova has been created some years after D. Scarlatti passed over...but bossa mixes jazz with many deep old elements of the Brazilian and
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 17, 2014

        P.S. I know that bossa nova has been created some years after D. Scarlatti passed over...but bossa mixes jazz with many deep old elements of the Brazilian and Portuguese music.



        ----Messaggio originale----
        Da: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
        Data: 17/06/2014 20.23
        A: <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
        Ogg: Re: R: Re: [RedHotJazz] What a shame to be so lo-tech

         

        One other thing about the "swing era"--(I just gotta chime in here, even though I'm likely preaching to the choir.) Whenever I use the word "swing" with people, they say, "Oh, you mean the swing era, and big bands." Even musicians I know have no idea that "swing" in jazz is an action, not a style. Before it is a noun or adjective, it is a verb. Some American music was swinging even before 1900. 


        To my mind, this heartbeat of American music, coming as it did from work song, brass bands, and the sanctified church, is the "active ingredient" in all jazz styles--the river than runs through.

        PG
        On Jun 17, 2014, at 1:33 PM, David Brown johnhaleysims@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:


         



      • alan504450
        Oh Man, now you is a talkin ! TTFN - 007 ... From: levi.marco@libero.it levi.marco@libero.it [RedHotJazz] To:
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 17, 2014
          Oh Man, now you is a talkin' !
          TTFN - 007



          -----Original Message-----
          From: 'levi.marco@...' levi.marco@... [RedHotJazz] <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
          To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tue, 17 Jun 2014 20:42
          Subject: R: Re: R: Re: [RedHotJazz] What a shame to be so lo-tech

           
          Oh yes Peter, the "Swing Era" is so called because the jazz of that time emphasized this important element of jazz music, possibly the more important (It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing...Ipse Duke Dixit!). Swing is not only related to jazz and the modern era. J.S Bach is the most beloved classical musician among the jazzmen that love his stunning scales, harmonies and his rhythms containing lots of  implicit and explicit swing.  They sometimes love to explore the Bach's music in a jazzy way (I remember the "Swingle Singers" from France, f.e.). And what about Domenico Scarlatti? The first time I listened to some of his harpsichord sonatas I told myself: Oh my God, that's bossa nova! Many years later I read a monography on this musician where my opinion was confirmed and explained with his stage at the Portuguese Court. You can easily imagine why that is related to some Scarlatti's south american influence (how much swing in samba, bossa nova etc!)
          Just a little highlight: 1917 is not the year when jazz was born but only the year when the first known jazz record was released. So the ODJB was the first Band to record  this music but not the only one to play it at the time.The rarely quoted " Wilbur Sweatman's Original Jass band" was already active in 1917/18 and this orchestra has nothing to envy to the O.D.J.B.
          Marco

          ----Messaggio originale----
          Da: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
          Data: 17/06/2014 20.23
          A: <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
          Ogg: Re: R: Re: [RedHotJazz] What a shame to be so lo-tech

           
          One other thing about the "swing era"--(I just gotta chime in here, even though I'm likely preaching to the choir.) Whenever I use the word "swing" with people, they say, "Oh, you mean the swing era, and big bands." Even musicians I know have no idea that "swing" in jazz is an action, not a style. Before it is a noun or adjective, it is a verb. Some American music was swinging even before 1900. 

          To my mind, this heartbeat of American music, coming as it did from work song, brass bands, and the sanctified church, is the "active ingredient" in all jazz styles--the river than runs through.

          PG
          On Jun 17, 2014, at 1:33 PM, David Brown johnhaleysims@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:


           
        • PETER GERLER
          Hello Marco, Yes, absolutely agree about Bach--the first jazz musician! Yes, the swing is there--waiting to be hatched, really. And where would American
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 18, 2014
            Hello Marco,

            Yes, absolutely agree about Bach--the first jazz musician! Yes, the swing is there--waiting to be hatched, really. And where would American popular song be without modulation--possible because of tempered tuning. Down the rabbit hole!

            In my younger days I had the privilege of studying with Jimmy Giuffre in New York. He told a story: One night he was driving down a country road when, on the radio, he heard a solo violinist playing Bach. He couldn't believe it--but the player was swinging. The announcer said it was Nathan Milstein. Then amazingly, the same thing happened to me 2 weeks later--I was driving, heard a violin playing Bach and swinging. I thought, "I bet it's Nathan Milstein." It was. 

            Now flash forward 40 years. Recently I was researching the influence of Jewish music on jazz, and I learned that Nathan Milstein had studied with a klezmer: dance music. Got it?!

            I agree about 1917--but don't forget about James Reese Europe, Will Marion Cook, and particularly the Original Creole Orchestra.

            Was never crazy about the Swingles--they seemed to be gilding the lily. 

            Best--Peter G

            On Jun 17, 2014, at 3:42 PM, 'levi.marco@...' levi.marco@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:

             

            Oh yes Peter, the "Swing Era" is so called because the jazz of that time emphasized this important element of jazz music, possibly the more important (It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing...Ipse Duke Dixit!). Swing is not only related to jazz and the modern era. J.S Bach is the most beloved classical musician among the jazzmen that love his stunning scales, harmonies and his rhythms containing lots of  implicit and explicit swing.  They sometimes love to explore the Bach's music in a jazzy way (I remember the "Swingle Singers" from France, f.e.). And what about Domenico Scarlatti? The first time I listened to some of his harpsichord sonatas I told myself: Oh my God, that's bossa nova! Many years later I read a monography on this musician where my opinion was confirmed and explained with his stage at the Portuguese Court. You can easily imagine why that is related to some Scarlatti's south american influence (how much swing in samba, bossa nova etc!)

            Just a little highlight: 1917 is not the year when jazz was born but only the year when the first known jazz record was released. So the ODJB was the first Band to record  this music but not the only one to play it at the time.The rarely quoted " Wilbur Sweatman's Original Jass band" was already active in 1917/18 and this orchestra has nothing to envy to the O.D.J.B.

            Marco


            ----Messaggio originale----
            Da: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
            Data: 17/06/2014 20.23
            A: <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
            Ogg: Re: R: Re: [RedHotJazz] What a shame to be so lo-tech

             

            One other thing about the "swing era"--(I just gotta chime in here, even though I'm likely preaching to the choir.) Whenever I use the word "swing" with people, they say, "Oh, you mean the swing era, and big bands." Even musicians I know have no idea that "swing" in jazz is an action, not a style. Before it is a noun or adjective, it is a verb. Some American music was swinging even before 1900. 


            To my mind, this heartbeat of American music, coming as it did from work song, brass bands, and the sanctified church, is the "active ingredient" in all jazz styles--the river than runs through.

            PG
            On Jun 17, 2014, at 1:33 PM, David Brown johnhaleysims@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:


             


          • alan504450
            I have a cassette tape/CD of a bunch of Chinese musicians called The Peking Brothers that used to play in the concourse at Covent Garden probably about 20
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 18, 2014
              I have a cassette tape/CD of a bunch of Chinese musicians called The Peking Brothers that used to play in the concourse at Covent Garden probably about 20 years ago. A lot of their repertoire was Chinese traditional music, much of which consists of some extremely haunting ballads but some of the up tempo pieces swing like mad. I do remember them live performing the William Tell overture and the line up included a hammered dulcimer played in lightning fashion and the piece swung like mad but to cap it all, they finished the session with Knees up Mother Brown which stomped along and had everyone tapping their feet. Swinging London !
              TTFN - 007



              -----Original Message-----
              From: PETER GERLER pgerler@... [RedHotJazz] <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
              To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Wed, 18 Jun 2014 14:09
              Subject: Re: R: Re: R: Re: [RedHotJazz] What a shame to be so lo-tech

               
              Hello Marco,

              Yes, absolutely agree about Bach--the first jazz musician! Yes, the swing is there--waiting to be hatched, really. And where would American popular song be without modulation--possible because of tempered tuning. Down the rabbit hole!

              In my younger days I had the privilege of studying with Jimmy Giuffre in New York. He told a story: One night he was driving down a country road when, on the radio, he heard a solo violinist playing Bach. He couldn't believe it--but the player was swinging. The announcer said it was Nathan Milstein. Then amazingly, the same thing happened to me 2 weeks later--I was driving, heard a violin playing Bach and swinging. I thought, "I bet it's Nathan Milstein." It was. 

              Now flash forward 40 years. Recently I was researching the influence of Jewish music on jazz, and I learned that Nathan Milstein had studied with a klezmer: dance music. Got it?!

              I agree about 1917--but don't forget about James Reese Europe, Will Marion Cook, and particularly the Original Creole Orchestra.

              Was never crazy about the Swingles--they seemed to be gilding the lily. 

              Best--Peter G

              On Jun 17, 2014, at 3:42 PM, 'levi.marco@...' levi.marco@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:

               

              Oh yes Peter, the "Swing Era" is so called because the jazz of that time emphasized this important element of jazz music, possibly the more important (It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing...Ipse Duke Dixit!). Swing is not only related to jazz and the modern era. J.S Bach is the most beloved classical musician among the jazzmen that love his stunning scales, harmonies and his rhythms containing lots of  implicit and explicit swing.  They sometimes love to explore the Bach's music in a jazzy way (I remember the "Swingle Singers" from France, f.e.). And what about Domenico Scarlatti? The first time I listened to some of his harpsichord sonatas I told myself: Oh my God, that's bossa nova! Many years later I read a monography on this musician where my opinion was confirmed and explained with his stage at the Portuguese Court. You can easily imagine why that is related to some Scarlatti's south american influence (how much swing in samba, bossa nova etc!)
              Just a little highlight: 1917 is not the year when jazz was born but only the year when the first known jazz record was released. So the ODJB was the first Band to record  this music but not the only one to play it at the time.The rarely quoted " Wilbur Sweatman's Original Jass band" was already active in 1917/18 and this orchestra has nothing to envy to the O.D.J.B.
              Marco

              ----Messaggio originale----
              Da: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
              Data: 17/06/2014 20.23
              A: <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
              Ogg: Re: R: Re: [RedHotJazz] What a shame to be so lo-tech

               
              One other thing about the "swing era"--(I just gotta chime in here, even though I'm likely preaching to the choir.) Whenever I use the word "swing" with people, they say, "Oh, you mean the swing era, and big bands." Even musicians I know have no idea that "swing" in jazz is an action, not a style. Before it is a noun or adjective, it is a verb. Some American music was swinging even before 1900. 

              To my mind, this heartbeat of American music, coming as it did from work song, brass bands, and the sanctified church, is the "active ingredient" in all jazz styles--the river than runs through.

              PG
              On Jun 17, 2014, at 1:33 PM, David Brown johnhaleysims@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:


               


            • Andrew Taylor
              There s an anecdote that Leonard Feather (I believe) writes about going with a group to see Tatum play. If I recall correctly (and he does), some lady asked
              Message 6 of 8 , Jun 18, 2014
                There's an anecdote that Leonard Feather (I believe) writes about going with a group to see Tatum play. 

                If I recall correctly (and he does), some lady asked Tatum "do you know Bach?" and Tatum replies "a little," then goes on to improvise on Bach for 45 minutes in his next set.

                Andrew

                On 6/18/2014 8:08 AM, PETER GERLER pgerler@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:
                 

                Hello Marco,


                Yes, absolutely agree about Bach--the first jazz musician! Yes, the swing is there--waiting to be hatched, really. And where would American popular song be without modulation--possible because of tempered tuning. Down the rabbit hole!

                In my younger days I had the privilege of studying with Jimmy Giuffre in New York. He told a story: One night he was driving down a country road when, on the radio, he heard a solo violinist playing Bach. He couldn't believe it--but the player was swinging. The announcer said it was Nathan Milstein. Then amazingly, the same thing happened to me 2 weeks later--I was driving, heard a violin playing Bach and swinging. I thought, "I bet it's Nathan Milstein." It was. 

                Now flash forward 40 years. Recently I was researching the influence of Jewish music on jazz, and I learned that Nathan Milstein had studied with a klezmer: dance music. Got it?!

                I agree about 1917--but don't forget about James Reese Europe, Will Marion Cook, and particularly the Original Creole Orchestra.

                Was never crazy about the Swingles--they seemed to be gilding the lily. 

                Best--Peter G

                On Jun 17, 2014, at 3:42 PM, 'levi.marco@...' levi.marco@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:

                 

                Oh yes Peter, the "Swing Era" is so called because the jazz of that time emphasized this important element of jazz music, possibly the more important (It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing...Ipse Duke Dixit!). Swing is not only related to jazz and the modern era. J.S Bach is the most beloved classical musician among the jazzmen that love his stunning scales, harmonies and his rhythms containing lots of  implicit and explicit swing.  They sometimes love to explore the Bach's music in a jazzy way (I remember the "Swingle Singers" from France, f.e.). And what about Domenico Scarlatti? The first time I listened to some of his harpsichord sonatas I told myself: Oh my God, that's bossa nova! Many years later I read a monography on this musician where my opinion was confirmed and explained with his stage at the Portuguese Court. You can easily imagine why that is related to some Scarlatti 's south american influence (how much swing in samba, bossa nova etc!)

                Just a little highlight: 1917 is not the year when jazz was born but only the year when the first known jazz record was released. So the ODJB was the first Band to record  this music but not the only one to play it at the time.The rarely quoted " Wilbur Sweatman's Original Jass band" was already active in 1917/18 and this orchestra has nothing to envy to the O.D.J.B.

                Marco


                ----Messaggio originale----
                Da: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
                Data: 17/06/2014 20.23
                A: <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
                Ogg: Re: R: Re: [RedHotJazz] What a shame to be so lo-tech

                 

                One other thing about the "swing era"--(I just gotta chime in here, even though I'm likely preaching to the choir.) Whenever I use the word "swing" with people, they say, "Oh, you mean the swing era, and big bands." Even musicians I know have no idea that "swing" in jazz is an action, not a style. Before it is a noun or adjective, it is a verb. Some American music was swinging even before 1900. 


                To my mind, this heartbeat of American music, coming as it did from work song, brass bands, and the sanctified church, is the "active ingredient" in all jazz styles--the river than runs through.

                PG
                On Jun 17, 2014, at 1:33 PM, David Brown johnhaleysims@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:


                 




                -- 
                Andrew Taylor, MLS
                Associate Curator, Visual Resources
                Department of Art History, Rice University
                713-348-4836
                https://twitter.com/agrahamt
              • alan504450
                That would be Art Tatum to a T - the man was awesome. Talking of piano styles, I am a great fan of the ragtime composers and, of course, Scott Joplin has to
                Message 7 of 8 , Jun 18, 2014
                  That would be Art Tatum to a 'T' - the man was awesome. Talking of piano styles, I am a great fan of the ragtime composers and, of course, Scott Joplin has to stand high in their ranks. I have a complete set of Joplin's works played by Richard Zimmerman which I occasionally listen to in the car. Trouble is, when I come to pieces like Bethena (a concert waltz) I have to stop the car as I can't drive in waltz time - it really puts me off. Perhaps I should concentrate more on the driving than the music. On the other hand, Tatum eases my journey blues and then nothing comes near to inducing road rage as the music flows over me and all is sweetness and light. I get a similar kick out of Fats Waller when I am driving - the happiness overwhelms me and is a calming influence.
                  TTFN - 007



                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Andrew Taylor agt2@... [RedHotJazz] <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
                  To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Wed, 18 Jun 2014 18:34
                  Subject: [RedHotJazz] Bach in the day

                   
                  There's an anecdote that Leonard Feather (I believe) writes about going with a group to see Tatum play. 

                  If I recall correctly (and he does), some lady asked Tatum "do you know Bach?" and Tatum replies "a little," then goes on to improvise on Bach for 45 minutes in his next set.

                  Andrew

                  On 6/18/2014 8:08 AM, PETER GERLER pgerler@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:
                   
                  Hello Marco,

                  Yes, absolutely agree about Bach--the first jazz musician! Yes, the swing is there--waiting to be hatched, really. And where would American popular song be without modulation--possible because of tempered tuning. Down the rabbit hole!

                  In my younger days I had the privilege of studying with Jimmy Giuffre in New York. He told a story: One night he was driving down a country road when, on the radio, he heard a solo violinist playing Bach. He couldn't believe it--but the player was swinging. The announcer said it was Nathan Milstein. Then amazingly, the same thing happened to me 2 weeks later--I was driving, heard a violin playing Bach and swinging. I thought, "I bet it's Nathan Milstein." It was. 

                  Now flash forward 40 years. Recently I was researching the influence of Jewish music on jazz, and I learned that Nathan Milstein had studied with a klezmer: dance music. Got it?!

                  I agree about 1917--but don't forget about James Reese Europe, Will Marion Cook, and particularly the Original Creole Orchestra.

                  Was never crazy about the Swingles--they seemed to be gilding the lily. 

                  Best--Peter G

                  On Jun 17, 2014, at 3:42 PM, 'levi.marco@...' levi.marco@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:

                   

                  Oh yes Peter, the "Swing Era" is so called because the jazz of that time emphasized this important element of jazz music, possibly the more important (It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing...Ipse Duke Dixit!). Swing is not only related to jazz and the modern era. J.S Bach is the most beloved classical musician among the jazzmen that love his stunning scales, harmonies and his rhythms containing lots of  implicit and explicit swing.  They sometimes love to explore the Bach's music in a jazzy way (I remember the "Swingle Singers" from France, f.e.). And what about Domenico Scarlatti? The first time I listened to some of his harpsichord sonatas I told myself: Oh my God, that's bossa nova! Many years later I read a monography on this musician where my opinion was confirmed and explained with his stage at the Portuguese Court. You can easily imagine why that is related to some Scarlatti 's south american influence (how much swing in samba, bossa nova etc!)
                  Just a little highlight: 1917 is not the year when jazz was born but only the year when the first known jazz record was released. So the ODJB was the first Band to record  this music but not the only one to play it at the time.The rarely quoted " Wilbur Sweatman's Original Jass band" was already active in 1917/18 and this orchestra has nothing to envy to the O.D.J.B.
                  Marco

                  ----Messaggio originale----
                  Da: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
                  Data: 17/06/2014 20.23
                  A: <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
                  Ogg: Re: R: Re: [RedHotJazz] What a shame to be so lo-tech

                   
                  One other thing about the "swing era"--(I just gotta chime in here, even though I'm likely preaching to the choir.) Whenever I use the word "swing" with people, they say, "Oh, you mean the swing era, and big bands." Even musicians I know have no idea that "swing" in jazz is an action, not a style. Before it is a noun or adjective, it is a verb. Some American music was swinging even before 1900. 

                  To my mind, this heartbeat of American music, coming as it did from work song, brass bands, and the sanctified church, is the "active ingredient" in all jazz styles--the river than runs through.

                  PG
                  On Jun 17, 2014, at 1:33 PM, David Brown johnhaleysims@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:


                   




                  -- 
                  Andrew Taylor, MLS
                  Associate Curator, Visual Resources
                  Department of Art History, Rice University
                  713-348-4836
                  https://twitter.com/agrahamt
                • PETER GERLER
                  Yep, and there was another incident where Tatum, standing way back in the hallway of a venue, listened to another pianist over the crowd. I don t recall the
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jun 18, 2014
                    Yep, and there was another incident where Tatum, standing way back in the hallway of a venue, listened to another pianist over the crowd. I don't recall the exact words, but basically Tatum told the club manager that the high G was flat.

                    PG
                    On Jun 18, 2014, at 1:33 PM, Andrew Taylor agt2@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:

                     

                    There's an anecdote that Leonard Feather (I believe) writes about going with a group to see Tatum play. 

                    If I recall correctly (and he does), some lady asked Tatum "do you know Bach?" and Tatum replies "a little," then goes on to improvise on Bach for 45 minutes in his next set.

                    Andrew

                    On 6/18/2014 8:08 AM, PETER GERLER pgerler@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:
                     

                    Hello Marco,


                    Yes, absolutely agree about Bach--the first jazz musician! Yes, the swing is there--waiting to be hatched, really. And where would American popular song be without modulation--possible because of tempered tuning. Down the rabbit hole!

                    In my younger days I had the privilege of studying with Jimmy Giuffre in New York. He told a story: One night he was driving down a country road when, on the radio, he heard a solo violinist playing Bach. He couldn't believe it--but the player was swinging. The announcer said it was Nathan Milstein. Then amazingly, the same thing happened to me 2 weeks later--I was driving, heard a violin playing Bach and swinging. I thought, "I bet it's Nathan Milstein." It was. 

                    Now flash forward 40 years. Recently I was researching the influence of Jewish music on jazz, and I learned that Nathan Milstein had studied with a klezmer: dance music. Got it?!

                    I agree about 1917--but don't forget about James Reese Europe, Will Marion Cook, and particularly the Original Creole Orchestra.

                    Was never crazy about the Swingles--they seemed to be gilding the lily. 

                    Best--Peter G

                    On Jun 17, 2014, at 3:42 PM, 'levi.marco@...' levi.marco@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:

                     

                    Oh yes Peter, the "Swing Era" is so called because the jazz of that time emphasized this important element of jazz music, possibly the more important (It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing...Ipse Duke Dixit!). Swing is not only related to jazz and the modern era. J.S Bach is the most beloved classical musician among the jazzmen that love his stunning scales, harmonies and his rhythms containing lots of  implicit and explicit swing.  They sometimes love to explore the Bach's music in a jazzy way (I remember the "Swingle Singers" from France, f.e.). And what about Domenico Scarlatti? The first time I listened to some of his harpsichord sonatas I told myself: Oh my God, that's bossa nova! Many years later I read a monography on this musician where my opinion was confirmed and explained with his stage at the Portuguese Court. You can easily imagine why that is related to some Scarlatti 's south american influence (how much swing in samba, bossa nova etc!)

                    Just a little highlight: 1917 is not the year when jazz was born but only the year when the first known jazz record was released. So the ODJB was the first Band to record  this music but not the only one to play it at the time.The rarely quoted " Wilbur Sweatman's Original Jass band" was already active in 1917/18 and this orchestra has nothing to envy to the O.D.J.B.

                    Marco


                    ----Messaggio originale----
                    Da: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
                    Data: 17/06/2014 20.23
                    A: <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
                    Ogg: Re: R: Re: [RedHotJazz] What a shame to be so lo-tech

                     

                    One other thing about the "swing era"--(I just gotta chime in here, even though I'm likely preaching to the choir.) Whenever I use the word "swing" with people, they say, "Oh, you mean the swing era, and big bands." Even musicians I know have no idea that "swing" in jazz is an action, not a style. Before it is a noun or adjective, it is a verb. Some American music was swinging even before 1900. 


                    To my mind, this heartbeat of American music, coming as it did from work song, brass bands, and the sanctified church, is the "active ingredient" in all jazz styles--the river than runs through.

                    PG
                    On Jun 17, 2014, at 1:33 PM, David Brown johnhaleysims@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:


                     




                    -- 
                    Andrew Taylor, MLS
                    Associate Curator, Visual Resources
                    Department of Art History, Rice University
                    713-348-4836
                    https://twitter.com/agrahamt


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