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New Orleans Revival: young musicians, old feeling.

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  • levi.marco@libero.it
    I suggest this Band to those who are skeptical about the vitality of N.O. Trad Jazz:http://youtu.be/RicINWvmAcgHope you enjoy it!Marco
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 16, 2014
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      I suggest this Band to those who are skeptical about the vitality of N.O. Trad Jazz:

      http://youtu.be/RicINWvmAcg

      Hope you enjoy it!

      Marco

       
    • PETER GERLER
      Hey Marco--Good stuff! I hadn t heard of these guys (some of the new young bands are coming through the cracks in the sidewalk). Barnabus Jones on trombone
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 16, 2014
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        Hey Marco--Good stuff! I hadn't heard of these guys (some of the new young bands are coming through the cracks in the sidewalk). Barnabus Jones on trombone also plays with Tuba Skinny and has gigged with Ben Polcer. Keep it coming! PG
      • Andrew Taylor
        Speaking of young musicians, I like the Perseverance Jazz band of Philadelphia, shown here with Steve Barbone sitting in on clarinet.
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 16, 2014
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          Speaking of young musicians, I like the Perseverance Jazz band of Philadelphia, shown here with Steve Barbone sitting in on clarinet.
          https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1463027580/hard-times-come-again-no-more-by-perseverance-jazz?ref=card

          On 6/16/2014 3:01 PM, PETER GERLER pgerler@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:
           

          Hey Marco--Good stuff! I hadn't heard of these guys (some of the new young bands are coming through the cracks in the sidewalk). Barnabus Jones on trombone also plays with Tuba Skinny and has gigged with Ben Polcer. Keep it coming! PG



          -- 
          Andrew Taylor, MLS
          Associate Curator, Visual Resources
          Department of Art History, Rice University
          713-348-4836
          https://twitter.com/agrahamt
        • Curt Ingram
          Wait! Those musicians are not old!
          Message 4 of 9 , Jun 16, 2014
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            Wait!  Those musicians are not old!

            On Jun 16, 2014, at 11:45 AM, "'levi.marco@...' levi.marco@... [RedHotJazz]" <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

             

            I suggest this Band to those who are skeptical about the vitality of N.O. Trad Jazz:

            http://youtu.be/RicINWvmAcg

            Hope you enjoy it!

            Marco

             

          • PETER GERLER
            Hey Andrew--yet another young trad band-- There s something happening here.... Thanks for the Perseverance track. One other thing: Joe Oliver s draft
            Message 5 of 9 , Jun 16, 2014
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              Hey Andrew--yet another young trad band--"There's something happening here...."
              Thanks for the Perseverance track.

              One other thing: Joe Oliver's draft registration, dated in Chicago on Sept. 12, 1918, shows clearly that he was in Chicago at that time, and working for Bill Bottoms (owner of Dreamland.). See
              http://www.doctorjazz.co.uk/draftcards2.html#musdc.

              Gene Anderson's piece, published in 1994, came before these draft certificates were easily available--so he didn't have that info. As for the rest of the play-by-play, 'Its a never-ending battle for truth, justice, and the American way." I've been working on a biography of Joe Oliver for some time, and it's a bear! Stella's testimony can sometimes be sketchy.

              All best,
              Peter Gerler
              Newton, MA
            • Andrew Taylor
              Hi Peter, And that s why they play the game! re: Oliver in Chicago by 09/12/18 I don t remember if McCusker included that, I ll take a look. Totally
              Message 6 of 9 , Jun 17, 2014
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                Hi Peter,

                And that's why they play the game! re: Oliver in Chicago by 09/12/18   I don't remember if McCusker included that, I'll take a look.

                Totally interesting - I look forward to your biography.

                The excellent  Dr. Jazz UK site has reposted that Ragtime Billy Tucker piece about Oliver at the Hiawatha Dance Club in LA.  I hope you are exploring the LA visits, meeting up with Ory, etc. 

                The California trip of the KOCJB is very romantic to me.

                Since I work at a research U. with a great library, I've got Jazz books scattered around my office right now.  I've been rereading "My Life in NO" by Armstrong just for fun, great stuff. I guess the tough guy "Nicodemus" from NOLA that Louis mentions isn't the dancer in "Shine" from 1930, but then Louis does mention that Nicodemus was a great dancer, so maybe?  I'll have to watch the Youtube again and look for the scar left by Black Benny's lead pipe.
                Nicodemus was a good gambler and one of the 
                best dancers the honky-tonks had ever seen. He was a 
                homely, liver-lipped sort of guy with a peculiar jazzy 
                way of dancing and mugging that would send the gang 
                in the tonk at Gravier and Franklin absolutely wild. 
                When he got tired of playing cotch in the room at the 
                back of the tonk he would come out on the dance floor 
                and tell us to strike up a tune. And he would grab the 
                sharpest chick standing by and would go into his two- 
                step routine, swinging all around the place. (SMLINO p.75)

                I can only imagine all the great research being done on the 1940 Census (released in 2012).  I'm not myself, but I'm taking a "Data Journalism" class, which is all about exploring data and telling stories with it.

                Right now my Timeline is too busy - if I strain some of the details out of it will probably read better, and be less intrusive.  It's kind of like working on a classic car, keep tinkering, it's good for the ol' noggin.  Since we're mostly aficionados here, able to bring up 1920's solos in our heads when we get bored, it's hard to know exactly how much specialized knowledge is needed to appreciate this kind of work.  It was an obvious thing for me to follow the paths that the scholars blazed and try to chart it, so I'm at least one degree removed from Bill Russell and "cats" like that.  I just mean to emphasize that I'm not roadtripping to Tulane or Rutgers and doing real research.
                That's an interesting thing about projects like my timeline.  I'm not really doing scholarly research (but reading and aggregating a lot), and don't particularly want to essentially replicate someone else's work, even if I give them credit.  On the other hand, that is exactly what I'm doing, although I believe it can be justified from a "fair use" perspective.  Hey, you can justify anything!  Doesn't mean there aren't real issues that should be considered

                Best wishes, Andrew

                ps - re: sketchy memories - hard for any of us to remember 30-40 years back accurately.  Here's a VF article about trying to authenticate a pic of Robert Johnson.  Colleague Honeyboy Edwards and Robert Lockwood Jr. (RJ's stepson) failed to identify Johnson, but RJ's son, Claude Johnson, did.  We just don't know.
                http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/features/2008/11/johnson200811

                On 6/16/2014 4:04 PM, PETER GERLER pgerler@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:
                 

                Hey Andrew--yet another young trad band--"There's something happening here...."
                Thanks for the Perseverance track.

                One other thing: Joe Oliver's draft registration, dated in Chicago on Sept. 12, 1918, shows clearly that he was in Chicago at that time, and working for Bill Bottoms (owner of Dreamland.). See
                http://www.doctorjazz.co.uk/draftcards2.html#musdc.

                Gene Anderson's piece, published in 1994, came before these draft certificates were easily available--so he didn't have that info. As for the rest of the play-by-play, 'Its a never-ending battle for truth, justice, and the American way." I've been working on a biography of Joe Oliver for some time, and it's a bear! Stella's testimony can sometimes be sketchy.

                All best,
                Peter Gerler
                Newton, MA



                -- 
                Andrew Taylor, MLS
                Associate Curator, Visual Resources
                Department of Art History, Rice University
                713-348-4836
                https://twitter.com/agrahamt
              • John McCusker
                Stella threw a lot of us off on the date because she gave a much later date for the move to Chicago. Oliver left, according to Ory, after the Wintergarden raid
                Message 7 of 9 , Jun 17, 2014
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                  Stella threw a lot of us off on the date because she gave a much later date for the move to Chicago. Oliver left, according to Ory, after the Wintergarden raid in June of 1918. The draft registration is consistant with Ory's timeline.


                  On Tuesday, June 17, 2014 10:47 AM, "Andrew Taylor agt2@... [RedHotJazz]" <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                   
                  Hi Peter,

                  And that's why they play the game! re: Oliver in Chicago by 09/12/18   I don't remember if McCusker included that, I'll take a look.

                  Totally interesting - I look forward to your biography.

                  The excellent  Dr. Jazz UK site has reposted that Ragtime Billy Tucker piece about Oliver at the Hiawatha Dance Club in LA.  I hope you are exploring the LA visits, meeting up with Ory, etc. 

                  The California trip of the KOCJB is very romantic to me.

                  Since I work at a research U. with a great library, I've got Jazz books scattered around my office right now.  I've been rereading "My Life in NO" by Armstrong just for fun, great stuff. I guess the tough guy "Nicodemus" from NOLA that Louis mentions isn't the dancer in "Shine" from 1930, but then Louis does mention that Nicodemus was a great dancer, so maybe?  I'll have to watch the Youtube again and look for the scar left by Black Benny's lead pipe.
                  Nicodemus was a good gambler and one of the 
                  best dancers the honky-tonks had ever seen. He was a 
                  homely, liver-lipped sort of guy with a peculiar jazzy 
                  way of dancing and mugging that would send the gang 
                  in the tonk at Gravier and Franklin absolutely wild. 
                  When he got tired of playing cotch in the room at the 
                  back of the tonk he would come out on the dance floor 
                  and tell us to strike up a tune. And he would grab the 
                  sharpest chick standing by and would go into his two- 
                  step routine, swinging all around the place. (SMLINO p.75)

                  I can only imagine all the great research being done on the 1940 Census (released in 2012).  I'm not myself, but I'm taking a "Data Journalism" class, which is all about exploring data and telling stories with it.

                  Right now my Timeline is too busy - if I strain some of the details out of it will probably read better, and be less intrusive.  It's kind of like working on a classic car, keep tinkering, it's good for the ol' noggin.  Since we're mostly aficionados here, able to bring up 1920's solos in our heads when we get bored, it's hard to know exactly how much specialized knowledge is needed to appreciate this kind of work.  It was an obvious thing for me to follow the paths that the scholars blazed and try to chart it, so I'm at least one degree removed from Bill Russell and "cats" like that.  I just mean to emphasize that I'm not roadtripping to Tulane or Rutgers and doing real research.
                  That's an interesting thing about projects like my timeline.  I'm not really doing scholarly research (but reading and aggregating a lot), and don't particularly want to essentially replicate someone else's work, even if I give them credit.  On the other hand, that is exactly what I'm doing, although I believe it can be justified from a "fair use" perspective.  Hey, you can justify anything!  Doesn't mean there aren't real issues that should be considered

                  Best wishes, Andrew

                  ps - re: sketchy memories - hard for any of us to remember 30-40 years back accurately.  Here's a VF article about trying to authenticate a pic of Robert Johnson.  Colleague Honeyboy Edwards and Robert Lockwood Jr. (RJ's stepson) failed to identify Johnson, but RJ's son, Claude Johnson, did.  We just don't know.
                  http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/features/2008/11/johnson200811

                  On 6/16/2014 4:04 PM, PETER GERLER pgerler@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:
                   
                  Hey Andrew--yet another young trad band--"There's something happening here...."
                  Thanks for the Perseverance track.

                  One other thing: Joe Oliver's draft registration, dated in Chicago on Sept. 12, 1918, shows clearly that he was in Chicago at that time, and working for Bill Bottoms (owner of Dreamland.). See
                  http://www.doctorjazz.co.uk/draftcards2.html#musdc.

                  Gene Anderson's piece, published in 1994, came before these draft certificates were easily available--so he didn't have that info. As for the rest of the play-by-play, 'Its a never-ending battle for truth, justice, and the American way." I've been working on a biography of Joe Oliver for some time, and it's a bear! Stella's testimony can sometimes be sketchy.

                  All best,
                  Peter Gerler
                  Newton, MA


                  -- 
                  Andrew Taylor, MLS
                  Associate Curator, Visual Resources
                  Department of Art History, Rice University
                  713-348-4836
                  https://twitter.com/agrahamt


                • Patrice Champarou
                  Me again, sorry Aside from the interesting discussions, and my pleasure to see such a “revival” of the group (Michael and I always wished more people to
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jun 17, 2014
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                    Me again, sorry
                     
                    Aside from the interesting discussions, and my pleasure to see such a “revival” of the group (Michael and I always wished more people to post, and I insist that “moderation” has never applied to the content of whatever you meant to write... if we could have guessed that just writing “unmoderated” on the tin would help, I would have done that sooner !) I think I have to intefere once again as the group’s “secretary”, for two reasons :
                    - Yahoo does not work the way it should
                    - Some people are really stupid
                     
                    a) The fact is that setting the default feature as “unmoderated” did not automagically change anything for people who were put automatically under moderation as “new” members, at the time they subscribed. No bulk action possible, which means I have to individually “unmoderate” a good third of the list.This takes six clicks and a nasty scroll for each account, so please be patient. It’s worth the effort, but I think it will take me at least a whole week, and I promise it is an utterly boring.job.
                     
                    b) As in any Yahoo group, email commands are available to all subscribers
                    Redhotjazz-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com removes you from the group
                    Redhotjazz-normal@yahoogroups.com allows you to receive individual messages
                    Redhotjazz-nomail@yahoogroups.com allows you to stop receiving individual mail
                    Redhotjazz-digest@yahoogroups.com provides you the torture of receiving all messages as a single one
                     
                    Now, how to use these commands ?
                     
                    VERY SIMPLE : CLICK AND SEND as explained !!! Send plain email, no subject, no text needed ((robots can’t read, you know !) to the RELEVANT address, and IT WORKS
                     
                    Some folks re-type the address instead of clicking the link and, of course, make mistakes... others set up their email address so that it cannot not be reached, and one lunatic is currently, repeatingly attempting to type the link inside messages to the group !!!
                     
                    I insist that while subscribing, you have accepted one rule : MEMBERS CANNOT HIDE THEIR EMAIL ADDRESS
                     
                    I am ready to help and patiently advise just anyone, but there is nothing more frustrating than writing to a dummy address, or to one which states that
                    “the recipient is only accepting mail from specific email addresses”.
                     
                    Patrice
                  • Andrew Taylor
                    Hi John, And you also mentioned that Jimmie Noone went north with Oliver to join Bill Johnson at the Royal Gardens (or Dreamland?), a lot of times Noone isn t
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jun 17, 2014
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                      Hi John,
                      And you also mentioned that Jimmie Noone went north with Oliver to join Bill Johnson at the Royal Gardens (or Dreamland?), a lot of times Noone isn't mentioned in that story. We have that picture of them with Johnson, I added the names:
                      http://agt2.web.rice.edu/CreoleJazzBand/Oliver-RoyalGardens-1918.jpg.  Have to update my date.
                      Thanks to John and Peter Gerler (and others perhaps) for figuring out and mentioning the more likely date for coming North based on Oliver's draft card rather than Stella Oliver's memory.   The web has it's good points! - Andrew
                       
                      On 6/17/2014 10:49 AM, John McCusker ory1886@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:
                       
                      Stella threw a lot of us off on the date because she gave a much later date for the move to Chicago. Oliver left, according to Ory, after the Wintergarden raid in June of 1918. The draft registration is consistant with Ory's timeline.


                      On Tuesday, June 17, 2014 10:47 AM, "Andrew Taylor agt2@... [RedHotJazz]" <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                       
                      Hi Peter,

                      And that's why they play the game! re: Oliver in Chicago by 09/12/18   I don't remember if McCusker included that, I'll take a look.

                      Totally interesting - I look forward to your biography.

                      The excellent  Dr. Jazz UK site has reposted that Ragtime Billy Tucker piece about Oliver at the Hiawatha Dance Club in LA.  I hope you are exploring the LA visits, meeting up with Ory, etc. 

                      The California trip of the KOCJB is very romantic to me.

                      Since I work at a research U. with a great library, I've got Jazz books scattered around my office right now.  I've been rereading "My Life in NO" by Armstrong just for fun, great stuff. I guess the tough guy "Nicodemus" from NOLA that Louis mentions isn't the dancer in "Shine" from 1930, but then Louis does mention that Nicodemus was a great dancer, so maybe?  I'll have to watch the Youtube again and look for the scar left by Black Benny's lead pipe.
                      Nicodemus was a good gambler and one of the 
                      best dancers the honky-tonks had ever seen. He was a 
                      homely, liver-lipped sort of guy with a peculiar jazzy 
                      way of dancing and mugging that would send the gang 
                      in the tonk at Gravier and Franklin absolutely wild. 
                      When he got tired of playing cotch in the room at the 
                      back of the tonk he would come out on the dance floor 
                      and tell us to strike up a tune. And he would grab the 
                      sharpest chick standing by and would go into his two- 
                      step routine, swinging all around the place. (SMLINO p.75)

                      I can only imagine all the great research being done on the 1940 Census (released in 2012).  I'm not myself, but I'm taking a "Data Journalism" class, which is all about exploring data and telling stories with it.

                      Right now my Timeline is too busy - if I strain some of the details out of it will probably read better, and be less intrusive.  It's kind of like working on a classic car, keep tinkering, it's good for the ol' noggin.  Since we're mostly aficionados here, able to bring up 1920's solos in our heads when we get bored, it's hard to know exactly how much specialized knowledge is needed to appreciate this kind of work.  It was an obvious thing for me to follow the paths that the scholars blazed and try to chart it, so I'm at least one degree removed from Bill Russell and "cats" like that.  I just mean to emphasize that I'm not roadtripping to Tulane or Rutgers and doing real research.
                      That's an interesting thing about projects like my timeline.  I'm not really doing scholarly research (but reading and aggregating a lot), and don't particularly want to essentially replicate someone else's work, even if I give them credit.  On the other hand, that is exactly what I'm doing, although I believe it can be justified from a "fair use" perspective.  Hey, you can justify anything!  Doesn't mean there aren't real issues that should be considered

                      Best wishes, Andrew

                      ps - re: sketchy memories - hard for any of us to remember 30-40 years back accurately.  Here's a VF article about trying to authenticate a pic of Robert Johnson.  Colleague Honeyboy Edwards and Robert Lockwood Jr. (RJ's stepson) failed to identify Johnson, but RJ's son, Claude Johnson, did.  We just don't know.
                      http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/features/2008/11/johnson200811

                      On 6/16/2014 4:04 PM, PETER GERLER pgerler@... [RedHotJazz] wrote:
                       
                      Hey Andrew--yet another young trad band--"There's something happening here...."
                      Thanks for the Perseverance track.

                      One other thing: Joe Oliver's draft registration, dated in Chicago on Sept. 12, 1918, shows clearly that he was in Chicago at that time, and working for Bill Bottoms (owner of Dreamland.). See
                      http://www.doctorjazz.co.uk/draftcards2.html#musdc.

                      Gene Anderson's piece, published in 1994, came before these draft certificates were easily available--so he didn't have that info. As for the rest of the play-by-play, 'Its a never-ending battle for truth, justice, and the American way." I've been working on a biography of Joe Oliver for some time, and it's a bear! Stella's testimony can sometimes be sketchy.

                      All best,
                      Peter Gerler
                      Newton, MA


                      -- 
                      Andrew Taylor, MLS
                      Associate Curator, Visual Resources
                      Department of Art History, Rice University
                      713-348-4836
                      https://twitter.com/agrahamt




                      -- 
                      Andrew Taylor, MLS
                      Associate Curator, Visual Resources
                      Department of Art History, Rice University
                      713-348-4836
                      https://twitter.com/agrahamt
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