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Re: [RedHotJazz] Dawkin's Famous Coloured Jazz Band

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  • Howard Rye
    This is actually before the ODJB arrived, at Liverpool on 1 April 1919. They¹ve never turned up in searches of the trade press. Fascinating. ... Howard Rye,
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 3, 2013
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      This is actually before the ODJB arrived, at Liverpool on 1 April 1919.
      They¹ve never turned up in searches of the trade press.

      Fascinating.


      on 02/03/2013 14:12, Richard Havers at rhavers1@... wrote:

      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Dear All
      >
      > Looking for some information on Dawkin's Famous Coloured Jazz Band. Were they
      > American?
      >
      > I have found an advert on 14 March 1919 that they were playing jazz "for the
      > first time in Scotland" on 24 March and they were "direct from London." This,
      > of course, is around the same time as the Original Dixieland Jazz Band arrived
      > in Britain.
      >
      > It's in connection with a book I am writing on Verve Records. Trust me there's
      > a connection. . .
      >
      > Thanks
      >
      > Richard
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >

      Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
      howard@...
      Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Howard Rye
      Should have added I agree that it is inconceivably unlikely that any British publication would have accepted an American spelling in an advertisement in 1919,
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 3, 2013
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        Should have added I agree that it is inconceivably unlikely that any British
        publication would have accepted an American spelling in an advertisement in
        1919, and not much more likely now. British copywriters even correct
        American place names like Pearl Harbor to an imaginary British version.


        on 02/03/2013 16:56, Richard Havers at rhavers1@... wrote:

        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Hi Mike
        >
        > Thanks for coming back. The advert was in The Scotsman newspaper so I think
        > they possibly altered the spelling to be the British way even if Dawkins and
        > Co came from America. I have trawled everywhere and can find nothing about
        > them.
        >
        > Cheers
        >
        > Richard
        >
        > On 2 Mar 2013, at 16:35, Mike Amato vintagetenor@...
        > <mailto:vintagetenor%40yahoo.com> > wrote:
        >
        >> > Hi Richard,
        >> > If the spelling you're using is correct, then that might give a clue.
        >> "Coloured" is the Britsih spelling. An American band would have used
        >> "colored".
        >> > Mike Amato
        >> >
        >> > Bedford Banjo Shop
        >> >
        >> > 114 S. Juliana Street
        >> >
        >> > Bedford, PA 15522
        >> >
        >> > (814) 623-2187
        >> >
        >> > http://www.bedfordbanjoshop.com
        >> >
        >> > --- On Sat, 3/2/13, Richard Havers rhavers1@...
        >> <mailto:rhavers1%40mac.com> > wrote:
        >> >
        >> > From: Richard Havers rhavers1@... <mailto:rhavers1%40mac.com> >
        >> > Subject: [RedHotJazz] Dawkin's Famous Coloured Jazz Band
        >> > To: "red hot jazz" RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
        >> <mailto:RedHotJazz%40yahoogroups.com> >
        >> > Date: Saturday, March 2, 2013, 9:12 AM
        >> >
        >> >
        >> >
        >> > Dear All
        >> >
        >> > Looking for some information on Dawkin's Famous Coloured Jazz Band. Were
        >> they American?
        >> >
        >> > I have found an advert on 14 March 1919 that they were playing jazz "for
        >> the first time in Scotland" on 24 March and they were "direct from London."
        >> This, of course, is around the same time as the Original Dixieland Jazz Band
        >> arrived in Britain.
        >> >
        >> > It's in connection with a book I am writing on Verve Records. Trust me
        >> there's a connection. . .
        >> >
        >> > Thanks
        >> >
        >> > Richard
        >> >
        >> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >> >
        >> >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >

        Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
        howard@...
        Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • lastofthebarons
        Not really. Sub-editors are so ignorant and ill educated, they allow any sort of mispelling to go uncorrected, so they are unlikely to alter Pearl Harbor.
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 3, 2013
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          Not really. Sub-editors are so ignorant and ill educated, they allow any sort of mispelling to go uncorrected, so they are unlikely to alter Pearl Harbor. Also, since most of the programmes with spell-checkers originate in the USA and they and the software maintenance staff don't realise they can alter the language to British English, even if they know there is a difference. Also if they know they can, they don't know how. The number of spelling mistakes and poor grammar in newsprint and elsewhere beggars the imagination.

          I'm glad I was born when I was.

          Rant over,

          Marc

          On 3 Mar 2013, at 14:07, Howard Rye <howard@...> wrote:

          > Should have added I agree that it is inconceivably unlikely that any British
          > publication would have accepted an American spelling in an advertisement in
          > 1919, and not much more likely now. British copywriters even correct
          > American place names like Pearl Harbor to an imaginary British version.
          >
          > on 02/03/2013 16:56, Richard Havers at rhavers1@... wrote:
          >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > Hi Mike
          > >
          > > Thanks for coming back. The advert was in The Scotsman newspaper so I think
          > > they possibly altered the spelling to be the British way even if Dawkins and
          > > Co came from America. I have trawled everywhere and can find nothing about
          > > them.
          > >
          > > Cheers
          > >
          > > Richard
          > >
          > > On 2 Mar 2013, at 16:35, Mike Amato vintagetenor@...
          > > > wrote:
          > >
          > >> > Hi Richard,
          > >> > If the spelling you're using is correct, then that might give a clue.
          > >> "Coloured" is the Britsih spelling. An American band would have used
          > >> "colored".
          > >> > Mike Amato
          > >> >
          > >> > Bedford Banjo Shop
          > >> >
          > >> > 114 S. Juliana Street
          > >> >
          > >> > Bedford, PA 15522
          > >> >
          > >> > (814) 623-2187
          > >> >
          > >> > http://www.bedfordbanjoshop.com
          > >> >
          > >> > --- On Sat, 3/2/13, Richard Havers rhavers1@...
          > >> > wrote:
          > >> >
          > >> > From: Richard Havers rhavers1@... >
          > >> > Subject: [RedHotJazz] Dawkin's Famous Coloured Jazz Band
          > >> > To: "red hot jazz" RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
          > >> >
          > >> > Date: Saturday, March 2, 2013, 9:12 AM
          > >> >
          > >> >
          > >> >
          > >> > Dear All
          > >> >
          > >> > Looking for some information on Dawkin's Famous Coloured Jazz Band. Were
          > >> they American?
          > >> >
          > >> > I have found an advert on 14 March 1919 that they were playing jazz "for
          > >> the first time in Scotland" on 24 March and they were "direct from London."
          > >> This, of course, is around the same time as the Original Dixieland Jazz Band
          > >> arrived in Britain.
          > >> >
          > >> > It's in connection with a book I am writing on Verve Records. Trust me
          > >> there's a connection. . .
          > >> >
          > >> > Thanks
          > >> >
          > >> > Richard
          > >> >
          > >> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >> >
          > >> >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          > Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
          > howard@...
          > Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Howard Rye
          Yeah, but it wasn t like that in 1919 or 1939, or even 1959. I m showing my age, perhaps. Spell-checkers are imposing American spelling on the British, but my
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 3, 2013
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            Yeah, but it wasn't like that in 1919 or 1939, or even 1959. I'm showing my
            age, perhaps. Spell-checkers are imposing American spelling on the British,
            but my parents book-shelves were full of stuff about the war referring to a
            non-existent place called Pearl Harbour. My father was a newspaperman and
            his paper's rigid policy was that no American spelling should ever appear
            anywhere, even in a quotation.


            on 03/03/2013 16:20, lastofthebarons at lastofthebarons@... wrote:

            > Not really. Sub-editors are so ignorant and ill educated, they allow any sort
            > of mispelling to go uncorrected, so they are unlikely to alter Pearl Harbor.
            > Also, since most of the programmes with spell-checkers originate in the USA
            > and they and the software maintenance staff don't realise they can alter the
            > language to British English, even if they know there is a difference. Also if
            > they know they can, they don't know how. The number of spelling mistakes and
            > poor grammar in newsprint and elsewhere beggars the imagination.
            >
            > I'm glad I was born when I was.
            >
            > Rant over,
            >
            > Marc
            >
            > On 3 Mar 2013, at 14:07, Howard Rye <howard@...> wrote:
            >
            >> Should have added I agree that it is inconceivably unlikely that any British
            >> publication would have accepted an American spelling in an advertisement in
            >> 1919, and not much more likely now. British copywriters even correct
            >> American place names like Pearl Harbor to an imaginary British version.
            >>
            >> on 02/03/2013 16:56, Richard Havers at rhavers1@... wrote:
            >>
            >>>
            >>>
            >>>
            >>>
            >>>
            >>> Hi Mike
            >>>
            >>> Thanks for coming back. The advert was in The Scotsman newspaper so I think
            >>> they possibly altered the spelling to be the British way even if Dawkins and
            >>> Co came from America. I have trawled everywhere and can find nothing about
            >>> them.
            >>>
            >>> Cheers
            >>>
            >>> Richard
            >>>
            >>> On 2 Mar 2013, at 16:35, Mike Amato vintagetenor@...
            >>>> wrote:
            >>>
            >>>>> Hi Richard,
            >>>>> If the spelling you're using is correct, then that might give a clue.
            >>>> "Coloured" is the Britsih spelling. An American band would have used
            >>>> "colored".
            >>>>> Mike Amato
            >>>>>
            >>>>> Bedford Banjo Shop
            >>>>>
            >>>>> 114 S. Juliana Street
            >>>>>
            >>>>> Bedford, PA 15522
            >>>>>
            >>>>> (814) 623-2187
            >>>>>
            >>>>> http://www.bedfordbanjoshop.com
            >>>>>
            >>>>> --- On Sat, 3/2/13, Richard Havers rhavers1@...
            >>>>> wrote:
            >>>>>
            >>>>> From: Richard Havers rhavers1@... >
            >>>>> Subject: [RedHotJazz] Dawkin's Famous Coloured Jazz Band
            >>>>> To: "red hot jazz" RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
            >>>>>
            >>>>> Date: Saturday, March 2, 2013, 9:12 AM
            >>>>>
            >>>>>
            >>>>>
            >>>>> Dear All
            >>>>>
            >>>>> Looking for some information on Dawkin's Famous Coloured Jazz Band. Were
            >>>> they American?
            >>>>>
            >>>>> I have found an advert on 14 March 1919 that they were playing jazz "for
            >>>> the first time in Scotland" on 24 March and they were "direct from London."
            >>>> This, of course, is around the same time as the Original Dixieland Jazz
            >>>> Band
            >>>> arrived in Britain.
            >>>>>
            >>>>> It's in connection with a book I am writing on Verve Records. Trust me
            >>>> there's a connection. . .
            >>>>>
            >>>>> Thanks
            >>>>>
            >>>>> Richard
            >>>>>
            >>>>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >>>>>
            >>>>>
            >>>
            >>> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >>>
            >>>
            >>>
            >>>
            >>>
            >>
            >> Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
            >> howard@...
            >> Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098
            >>
            >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >>
            >>
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
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            >

            Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
            howard@...
            Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098
          • steve
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 12, 2013
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              --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Richard Havers <rhavers1@...> wrote:
              >
              > Dear All
              >
              > Looking for some information on Dawkin's Famous Coloured Jazz Band. Were they American?
              >
              > I have found an advert on 14 March 1919 that they were playing jazz "for the first time in Scotland" on 24 March and they were "direct from London." This, of course, is around the same time as the Original Dixieland Jazz Band arrived in Britain.
              >
              > It's in connection with a book I am writing on Verve Records. Trust me there's a connection. . .
              >
              > Thanks
              >
              > Richard
              >
            • howardrye
              I have already been in direct touch with the enquirer but Dawkins is almost certainly the West Indian bandleader and drummer more commonly known under the name
              Message 6 of 9 , Mar 20, 2013
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                I have already been in direct touch with the enquirer but Dawkins is almost certainly the West Indian bandleader and drummer more commonly known under the name Oscar Logan, whose full real name was Oscar Newton Logan Dawkins. He was recalled by Leslie Thompson, who gives the impression he was secretive about his ancestry and no source located gives a clue to where he came from, but the Trinidadian bandleader Al Jennings was a witness at his wedding to a lady from Nottingham. They appear to have moved from London to Nottingham when war broke out and Oscar died there in 1942 at the age of 46 having carved a sufficient local reputation for his doings to be on the front page of the Nottingham Evening Post.
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