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Re: [RedHotJazz] Museum poster ?

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  • Patrice Champarou
    For some reason, the URL to the picture http://tinyurl.com/8kcamc5 landed on the message board, but never reached my mailbox. This is not the first time, I
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 1, 2012
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      For some reason, the URL to the picture http://tinyurl.com/8kcamc5
      landed on the message board, but never reached my mailbox. This is not the first time, I would beg anyone in the same situation to please report it (privately) so that I know if I should blame my provider, or fix something with the group’s functionalities.

      Doesn’t anyone think that the “left-handed trombonist” somewhat looks like W.C. Handy ?
      And wasn’t the aborted project of a jazz museum previously discussed here years ago?

      Patrice

      From: Bob Smith
      Sent: Friday, August 31, 2012 10:10 PM
      To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [RedHotJazz] Museum poster ?


      The poster is very interesting in that there aren't many museums that feature or featured jazz musicians. I mean, of course, other than the museums specializing in a particular musician, such as the Louis Armstrong museum.
      I'm a bit puzzled by the trombonist on the left. It can't be Jim Robinson for several reasons - he wasn't left -handed, his hair and hair-style were totally different from the man in the picture, and I doubt very much whether he was sufficiently known at the time the poster was made. After all, he was a dock worker, and virtually an amateur musician, until he became known in the jazz revival in the early 1940's.
      The only left-handed trombonist that I know of was Albert Wynn. He was born in New Orleans (1907), but moved to Chicago at an early age. Then again, he didn't have the physique and hair-style of the man in the picture.
      Face and hair style remind me most of George Brunis, but he wasn't left-handed. It is, however, possible that the picture was reversed to achieve a pictorial balance.

      Bob Smith


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • fearfeasa
      The left-handed trombonist is Kid Ory, mirrored. All the musicians on this poster have been badly drawn from photographs. The poster is worthless, except as
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 1, 2012
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        The "left-handed" trombonist is Kid Ory, mirrored. All the musicians on this poster have been badly drawn from photographs. The poster is worthless, except as a curio.

        JT Dyamond

        Sent from iCloud


        On Sep 01, 2012, at 06:16 PM, Patrice Champarou <patrice.champarou@...> wrote:

        > For some reason, the URL to the picture http://tinyurl.com/8kcamc5
        > landed on the message board, but never reached my mailbox. This is not the first time, I would beg anyone in the same situation to please report it (privately) so that I know if I should blame my provider, or fix something with the group’s functionalities.
        >
        > Doesn’t anyone think that the “left-handed trombonist” somewhat looks like W.C. Handy ?
        > And wasn’t the aborted project of a jazz museum previously discussed here years ago?
        >
        > Patrice
        >
        > From: Bob Smith
        > Sent: Friday, August 31, 2012 10:10 PM
        > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [RedHotJazz] Museum poster ?
        >
        > The poster is very interesting in that there aren't many museums that feature or featured jazz musicians. I mean, of course, other than the museums specializing in a particular musician, such as the Louis Armstrong museum.
        > I'm a bit puzzled by the trombonist on the left. It can't be Jim Robinson for several reasons - he wasn't left -handed, his hair and hair-style were totally different from the man in the picture, and I doubt very much whether he was sufficiently known at the time the poster was made. After all, he was a dock worker, and virtually an amateur musician, until he became known in the jazz revival in the early 1940's.
        > The only left-handed trombonist that I know of was Albert Wynn. He was born in New Orleans (1907), but moved to Chicago at an early age. Then again, he didn't have the physique and hair-style of the man in the picture.
        > Face and hair style remind me most of George Brunis, but he wasn't left-handed. It is, however, possible that the picture was reversed to achieve a pictorial balance.
        >
        > Bob Smith
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Bob Smith
        Dear JT Dyamond Sorry, but I can t agree. Kid Ory was a smallish, dapper man just like the man on the right. He played the trombone right-handed, and his
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 1, 2012
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          Dear JT Dyamond

          Sorry, but I can't agree. Kid Ory was a smallish, dapper man just like the
          man on the right. He played the trombone right-handed, and his trombones(s),
          in all the pictures I've seen, had a circular balancing weight on the tuning
          slide that is not present on the trombone on the left.
          He wasn't born in New Orleans, but moved there when he was 25 years old, and led a very successful
          jazz orchestra during World War I.

          Kind Regards

          Bob Smith




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • fearfeasa
          What have Ory s birthplace and his age when he moved to New Orleans got to do with the poster in question ? I know he played the trombone righthanded : didn t
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 1, 2012
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            What have Ory's birthplace and his age when he moved to New Orleans got to do with the poster in question ?

            I know he played the trombone righthanded : didn't I say the picture of him was mirrored ?

            You're quite correct in describing him as "a smallish, dapper man" and so is the man on the left, which you'll realise if you examine the perspective carefully.

            The drawing has been taken from a late photograph of Ory and then mirrored so that he's facing into the page rather than out of it.

            As for the "circular balancing weight" — is it not possible that he had more than one trombone during his long career ?

            JT Dyamond


            

            On Sep 01, 2012, at 11:38 PM, Bob Smith <robert.smith@...> wrote:

            > Dear JT Dyamond
            >
            > Sorry, but I can't agree. Kid Ory was a smallish, dapper man just like the
            > man on the right. He played the trombone right-handed, and his trombones(s),
            > in all the pictures I've seen, had a circular balancing weight on the tuning
            > slide that is not present on the trombone on the left.
            > He wasn't born in New Orleans, but moved there when he was 25 years old, and led a very successful
            > jazz orchestra during World War I.
            >
            > Kind Regards
            >
            > Bob Smith
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Ory1886
            Ory was born Christmas day 1886 according to his baptismal certificate. He is on the 1910 census in New Orleans. For more read my book Creole Trombone which
            Message 5 of 9 , Sep 1, 2012
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              Ory was born Christmas day 1886 according to his baptismal certificate. He is on the 1910 census in New Orleans.
              For more read my book Creole Trombone which comes out Oct. 2.
              Regards,
              John McCusker

              Sent from my iPhone

              On Sep 1, 2012, at 9:15 AM, fearfeasa <fearfeasa@...> wrote:

              > Dyamond
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.