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Re: [RedHotJazz] Kid Ory and reading music.

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  • John McCusker
    Ory took lessons in Chicago after joining Oliver s band according to his autobiography. The purpose was to learn to read better and develop his tone. I think
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 8, 2012
      Ory took lessons in Chicago after joining Oliver's band according to his autobiography. The purpose was to learn to read better and develop his tone. I think if you compare his solo from "Black Snake Blues," his last recording with Oliver, with his early recordings from 1925, or even 1922, you will hear clearly that the man's style evolved. Or compare Ory's performance of Ory's Creole Trombone between the 1922 and 1927 versions.



      ________________________________
      From: ALAN BOND <alan_bond@...>
      To: "RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com" <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, March 8, 2012 3:24 AM
      Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] King Oliver's Dixie Syncopators/George Filhé


       
      Hi Folks,

                    George Filhe was 52 in 1926 which, by the standards of the time, was an age close to the life expectancy of  the average man in the US.
      Being black he probably also had a lower life expectancy than a white
      man. By trade he was a cigar maker, which is apparently confirmed by census records of the time and this may have had some bearing on his health too. Strangley enough though, he lived until he was 82 and did not die until 1954. There are also probably other factors about his health and lifestyle of which we know nothing. Many musicians were semi professional and playing gigs was a way of supplementing family incomes for a lot of them.
                    Brian Rust & Walter Allen were very meticulous in their researches and would always make a point of mentioning any uncertainty in their assessments. The fact that a lot of their information came from Luis Russell would lend weight to its accuracy as Russell appears to have been a methodical and thorough man who kept extensive records of his activities plus the fact that he was actually involved in these sessions. Another factor which must be considered is that Joe Oliver played with (and for) Ory's bands in New Orleans before the first world war so Ory's work would have been well known to him. Also, Ory could apparently read music but there is some doubt as to whether Filhe could do so. In all probability, Joe would have wanted someone who could read well so as to make sure the Vocalion contract went well. The fact that Filhe was in Olivers' band at all is because he was a replacement for Honore Dutrey who suffered badly from
      asthma and is believed to have gone home to New Orleans after Christmas of 1923 and only returned to Chicago at the request of Johnny Dodds in the spring of 1927. Something else that needs to be take into account is the fact that Ory was very much the new man in the band which palyed in a style and manner which was a contrast to the work he was doing with Armstrong. Ory could well have been 'feeling his way' on this first recording session until he became familiar with the arrangements.
      TTFN - 007

      Sent: Thursday, 8 March 2012, 8:03
      Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] King Oliver's Dixie Syncopators/George Filhé


      Like it or not, Ory was identified on these sessions by Luis Russell, who
      was there, and who was played the records by Walt Allen, a man not given
      to
      misrepresenting what he had done to validate pet theories.

      Ory identified himself on Deep Henderson and Jackass when played them (I
      can¹t see any sign he was played Too Bad and Snag It and I wonder why not).

      I think it will take more compelling evidence than what anybody thinks they
      hear to set this aside. This is a situation in which speculation is not so
      much fun as a complete waste of time. I suppose one can argue that Ory might
      have misidentified himself to claim some glory, but it¹s hard to see what
      Russell¹s motives might have been.

      >

       
      Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
      howard@...
      Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098

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