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Re: [RedHotJazz] Oscar 'Bernie' Young

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  • Howard Rye
    There is a Louisiana-born Oscar Young, aged 21, lodging with his wife Beatrice, 19, at 505 33rd Street, Chicago, on 10 January 1920. He is a laborer in a steel
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 2, 2012
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      There is a Louisiana-born Oscar Young, aged 21, lodging with his wife
      Beatrice, 19, at 505 33rd Street, Chicago, on 10 January 1920. He is a
      laborer in a steel mill but as his landlord was George Filhé, Louisiana-born
      musician, aged 46, I think we can feel some confidence this is our man.

      on 02/03/2012 08:18, David Brown at johnhaleysims@... wrote:

      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Can anybody come up with any information -- beyond Hillman notes on the Frog
      > issue -- on this trumpeter/cornettist active in Chicago in the 20s. He was
      > reportedly from N.O. and would have a speculated birth date of about very
      > approx. 1890+.
      >
      > It seems that the Bernie was no part of his official name.
      >




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    • David Brown
      Howard s Oscar Young, 21 in 1920 Chicago, makes me question just how New Orleanian was his style. At the very least, he came to Chicago before full maturity
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 5, 2012
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        Howard's Oscar Young, 21 in 1920 Chicago, makes me question just how New
        Orleanian was his style. At the very least, he came to Chicago before full
        maturity and maybe even earlier. This I can believe because his style
        conforms to no N.O. model. His earliest sides are stiff with much mute work
        and suggest nobody more than Johnny Dunn. Later -- assuming this is the same
        player -- he absorbs Chicago Oliver, to whom his mature style is nearest.

        However, the photos in the Frog annual, especially that of the Wisconsin
        Orchestra of 1928, seem to show an older man but then that could have been
        due to wear and tear down at the mill.

        We seem to have no reports after about 1930 or ?

        Dave


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