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Johnny Dunn was Open trumpet solos on King Oliver's records

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  • David Brown
    Hi Brian Nice to hear. Thanks for link. Fascinating footage -- for various reasons. The wa-wa there is very near Bubber and one can wonder at which way
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 12, 2011
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      Hi Brian


      Nice to hear. Thanks for link. Fascinating footage -- for various reasons.
      The wa-wa there is very near Bubber and one can wonder at which way
      influence passed. The muted trumpet obbligato from the other, presumably
      Dutch, player is also pretty good and surprisingly 'modern' -- consistent
      with contemporary US style of 1933.

      I actually agree on Dunn and did say he improved -- under 'western'
      influence. Earlier he is playing in 'eastern', rather bugle, style.

      The fact that Pops criticises him as 'just wa-wa' suggests to me that Dunn's
      wa-wa was not from N.O.

      Jazz Histories have tended to 'up the river' the early E.coast cornet style
      of such as Dunn, Tom Morris and Bubber, especially as regards their wa-wa.

      All Best

      Dave




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • yves francois
      Hi David (and everyone) the other trumpeter is Rolf Goldstein, who plays nice muted trumpet in back of the vocals. he is on the Dutch Decca session of Freddy
      Message 2 of 12 , Aug 12, 2011
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        Hi David (and everyone)
        the other trumpeter is Rolf Goldstein, who plays nice muted trumpet in back of the vocals. he is on the Dutch Decca session of Freddy Johnson in 1934, that has been reissued too fast on most reissues (TOM LP and Chronological Classics), slow the recordings down a step or so and you hear a fine trumpet and a much better female vocalist than the reissue indicates. Trombonist is Jake Green another Harlem player from the 1920's, who is on both this film short and the Johnson session. Dunn is most fascinating here - this and a session with Josephine Baker are all that we (currently) know of his playing in Europe (and he is only playing Parts in the Baker session - too bad they did not get to stretch out - Oscar Aleman and Romeu Silva were also in the band). Dunn style was much improved by 1928, but I like his haunting trumpet on "What Do You Care" with Edith Wilson quite a bit ...
        hope this helps -Yves François

        --- On Fri, 8/12/11, David Brown <johnhaleysims@...> wrote:

        From: David Brown <johnhaleysims@...>
        Subject: [RedHotJazz] Johnny Dunn was Open trumpet solos on King Oliver's records
        To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Friday, August 12, 2011, 3:28 AM







         









        Hi Brian



        Nice to hear. Thanks for link. Fascinating footage -- for various reasons.

        The wa-wa there is very near Bubber and one can wonder at which way

        influence passed. The muted trumpet obbligato from the other, presumably

        Dutch, player is also pretty good and surprisingly 'modern' -- consistent

        with contemporary US style of 1933.



        I actually agree on Dunn and did say he improved -- under 'western'

        influence. Earlier he is playing in 'eastern', rather bugle, style.



        The fact that Pops criticises him as 'just wa-wa' suggests to me that Dunn's

        wa-wa was not from N.O.



        Jazz Histories have tended to 'up the river' the early E.coast cornet style

        of such as Dunn, Tom Morris and Bubber, especially as regards their wa-wa.



        All Best



        Dave



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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