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Re: [RedHotJazz] What the Papers Say...

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  • Bob Eagle
    Howard, does Josephine know you are being as explicit about this as you are?  (The habits of a lifetime die hard.) Josephine, if you are reading this, please
    Message 1 of 54 , May 24 4:34 AM
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      Howard, does Josephine know you are being as explicit about this as you are? 
      (The habits of a lifetime die hard.)

      Josephine, if you are reading this, please pull your boy into line <g>.

      Cheers
      Bob



      ________________________________
      From: Howard Rye <howard@...>
      To: red hot jazz <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tue, 24 May, 2011 7:26:52 PM
      Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] What the Papers Say...

       
      No idea what the regulations for record production in the U.K. in wartime
      were. I am sure the output was restricted. Did you perhaps have to hand in a
      record for recycling to buy a new one? Did I make that up? Is that some
      other country? Try Benny Green, ŒSwingtime In Tottenham¹, which I vaguely
      recall having something to say about it. Hilarious read anyway.

      No access to Larkin¹s books, but I recall some widely quoted remark about
      how jazz went downhill when it ceased to be about black people trying to
      please white folks. May be traducing him. Don¹t really care. His private
      diaries are said to reveal him as a pretty vicious racist whose love for
      jazz was not matched by the most minimal respect for its creators, common
      enough in his generation. But I haven¹t read them and do not intend to. Life
      is too short.

      Minstrelism is the kind of grovelling Uncle Tom attitude to music production
      (allegedly) embraced by Larkin. Minstrelsy is a musical and associated
      entertainment style current in the nineteenth century at root of which is a
      body of genuinely African-American (and Irish) creative performance, which
      is now being painstakingly disinterred from its white imitators and racist
      patina both by historians (some very good stuff in Constance Valis Hill. Tap
      Dancing America. A Cultural History. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010.)
      and by some contemporary African-American performers like the Carolina
      Chocolate Drops. At the Union Chapel in London in November last year
      Rhiannon Giddens delivered a stern lecture about the importance of
      minstrelsy as a record of nineteenth century African-American music to an
      audience of staunch white liberals which was showing signs of discomfort at
      some of the material presented. I have heard similar lectures from Wycliffe
      Gordon at a Wynton Marsalis concert and from Guy Davis in the context of
      Otis Taylor¹s Recapturing The Banjo project.

      John Harris is not cool or even kool, just an old-fashioned liberal who
      isn¹t keeping up! And believes what other journalists tell him.

      African-American models predominated in Britain in the early 20s. The
      recorded evidence is on the records of Vorzanger¹s band and the Queen¹s
      Dance Orchestra. That was the music being played in the clubs, but for
      reasons that require a book (and to some extent Catherine Parsonage¹s ŒThe
      Evolution of Jazz in Britain¹ is that book), the ³British jazz started with
      Fred Elizalde² myth has become the received wisdom. This is getting to be
      slightly tired ground. We¹ve been here before. Unfortunately the myth will
      shortly be given a new lease on life with the republication of its most
      visible embodiment.

      Mindful of the libel laws, I decline to comment on certain trends at
      Preservation Hall, but Mark Braud is the best thing to happen to the band in
      years. And he has the ability of his forbears to switch from serious music
      making to crowd pleasing nonsence and back again in the blink of an eye. You
      win some, you lose some. Tra la la.

      No one interested in the continuing health of the tradition should miss any
      of:

      Dr. Michael White, Adventures in New Orleans Jazz (Basin Street BSR0505-2)
      Cynthia Girtley, A New Orleans Tribute to Mahalia Jackson (Cynthia Girtley
      0357)
      Treme Brass Band, Treme Traditions (Mardi Gras MG1126)

      Mission accomplished perhaps.

      Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
      howard@...
      Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098

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    • ROBERT R. CALDER
      Well said, Luis!  NETIQUETTE, PLEASE, some would-be contributors!!! You come here to respond to messages NOT TO BURY THEM in copies of the same text Please
      Message 54 of 54 , Aug 23, 2012
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        Well said, Luis! 
        NETIQUETTE, PLEASE, some would-be contributors!!!
        You come here to respond to messages
        NOT TO BURY THEM in copies of the same text
        Please delete the hundreds of lines to which
        you are replying. 

        RRC

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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