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Not brass bands

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  • Tony Standish
    Good day Dave and others Lovely to see John Kendall get a mention. That tiny basement beneath Dobell s kept me afloat for years, flogging review copies from
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 3, 2011
      Good day Dave and others

      Lovely to see John Kendall get a mention.
      That tiny basement beneath Dobell's kept me afloat for years, flogging review copies from the Journal for a few shiilings each - mind you, much of it went for pints around the corner at a pub in Shaftesbury Avenue.
      He was a lovely man, and I spent many hours taping his 78s before he moved into the Hammersmith flat we were vacating prior to retuning to Australia in '63.
      Record retailers should have a Hall of Fame - Kendal, Pete Russell, Dave Carey, Norman Pierce, Koester and, of course, Doug Dobell are a few who spring to mind
      The brass band discussion is great, but I do take exception to anyone rubbishing the Mulligan band - Melly's "Waiting for a train" is one of my all-time favourite records!
      Tony Standish



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Howard Rye
      And Marili Morden. You would probably be interested in Cary Ginell¹s book Hot Jazz For Sale: Hollywood¹s Jazz Man Record Shop, published through lulu.com
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 3, 2011
        And Marili Morden.

        You would probably be interested in Cary Ginell¹s book Hot Jazz For Sale:
        Hollywood¹s Jazz Man Record Shop, published through lulu.com last year.
        Certainly recommendable to anyone interested in the West Coast scene in the
        40s and 50s.

        on 03/02/2011 12:41, Tony Standish at mojohand@... wrote:

        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Good day Dave and others
        >
        > Lovely to see John Kendall get a mention.
        > That tiny basement beneath Dobell's kept me afloat for years, flogging review
        > copies from the Journal for a few shiilings each - mind you, much of it went
        > for pints around the corner at a pub in Shaftesbury Avenue.
        > He was a lovely man, and I spent many hours taping his 78s before he moved
        > into the Hammersmith flat we were vacating prior to retuning to Australia in
        > '63.
        > Record retailers should have a Hall of Fame - Kendal, Pete Russell, Dave
        > Carey, Norman Pierce, Koester and, of course, Doug Dobell are a few who spring
        > to mind
        > The brass band discussion is great, but I do take exception to anyone
        > rubbishing the Mulligan band - Melly's "Waiting for a train" is one of my
        > all-time favourite records!
        > Tony Standish
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >


        Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
        howard@...
        Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • ALAN BOND
        Hi Tony,                 My take on the Mulligan band is that they were not as conistent as many would like. Whatever you think of him there was
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 3, 2011
          Hi Tony,
                          My take on the Mulligan band is that they were not as conistent as many would like. Whatever you think of him there was certainly never a dull moment with Mick Mulligan about but he never seemed to be aware of the effect he had on people, unlike the often sour Ruby Braff  who was once told by the inimitable Sandy Brown to 'try eating some o' them chips you have on yer shoulder' but oh, that beautiful cornet playing of his was so silky and mesmerising I could listen to it for ever.

                          We used to meet up with John Kendall on a regular basis (usually Saturday lunchtime after Dobell's closed for the day) and the favourite watering hole was 'The Scots Hoose' by the Cambridge Theatre. We found we had a willing landlord and were able to imbibe until opening time at five. When John had his own shop, business was, to put it mildly, slow and he used to sit in the pub opposite watching for customers and if any appeared he would run over and open up for them to browse before returning to his alcove in the boozer. A lovely way to run a shop.

                           Many, many years ago John lived in the flats over the top of the shops where Dobell's was situated before everything was redeveloped and if I remember correctly he had a live in lady friend who went by the name of Pascalle whs was, and may still be for all I know, French and rather volatile. He returned to the flat after a Saturday afternoon session very, very late for some event or function about which he had forgotten and the lady's gallic temperament disposed her to throw him down two flights of stairs and break his arm. He was of the opinion that it would have hurt a lot more if he had been sober. That was John, ever the laid back pragmatist from (latterly) Belsize Park.

          TTFN - 007

          --- On Thu, 3/2/11, Tony Standish <mojohand@...> wrote:

          From: Tony Standish <mojohand@...>
          Subject: [RedHotJazz] Not brass bands
          To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Thursday, 3 February, 2011, 12:41

          Good day Dave and others

          Lovely to see John Kendall get a mention.
          That tiny basement beneath Dobell's kept me afloat for years, flogging review copies from the Journal for a few shiilings each - mind you, much of it went for pints around the corner at a pub in Shaftesbury Avenue.
          He was a lovely man, and I spent many hours taping his 78s before he moved into the Hammersmith flat we were vacating prior to retuning to Australia in '63.
          Record retailers should have a Hall of Fame - Kendal, Pete Russell, Dave Carey, Norman Pierce, Koester and, of course, Doug Dobell are a few who spring to mind
          The brass band discussion is  great, but I do take exception to anyone rubbishing the Mulligan band - Melly's "Waiting for a train" is one of my all-time favourite records!
          Tony Standish



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Robert
          My copy of this well-researched, and apparently self-published, book arrived this week. It contains generous extracts from Dave Stuart s letters to Bill
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 11, 2011
            My copy of this well-researched, and apparently self-published, book arrived this week. It contains generous extracts from Dave Stuart's letters to Bill Russell, and just enough from Bill for us to infer his opinion of the Yerba Buena records. The author rightly gives overdue credit to Marili Morden but achieves an act of gender reassignment in turning Mary Karoley, the first person to record Bunk, into Mark Karoley, proving, I'd say, that the author hasn't listened to those now easily-available recordings. He also uncritically takes on the official line regarding Bunk's age, fully confident that 1889 was Bunk's "true birth year." Has Bunk's true birth year now been established beyond all dispute? First I've heard of it if so…
            Robert Greenwood


            --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Howard Rye <howard@...> wrote:
            >
            > And Marili Morden.
            >
            > You would probably be interested in Cary Ginell¹s book Hot Jazz For Sale:
            > Hollywood¹s Jazz Man Record Shop, published through lulu.com last year.
            > Certainly recommendable to anyone interested in the West Coast scene in the
            > 40s and 50s.
          • m15romano
            Hello Robert. You are correct. According to Prof Gushee & Peter Hanley, Bunk Johnson s birth year is not truely known for certain. All the evidence can be
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 11, 2011
              Hello Robert.

              You are correct. According to Prof Gushee & Peter Hanley, Bunk Johnson's birth year is not truely known for certain. All the evidence can be viewed here.

              http://www.doctorjazz.co.uk/portnewor.html#bunkjohn

              Thank you.

              Marco Romano.

              --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "Robert" <robertgreenwood_54uk@...> wrote:
              >
              > My copy of this well-researched, and apparently self-published, book arrived this week. It contains generous extracts from Dave Stuart's letters to Bill Russell, and just enough from Bill for us to infer his opinion of the Yerba Buena records. The author rightly gives overdue credit to Marili Morden but achieves an act of gender reassignment in turning Mary Karoley, the first person to record Bunk, into Mark Karoley, proving, I'd say, that the author hasn't listened to those now easily-available recordings. He also uncritically takes on the official line regarding Bunk's age, fully confident that 1889 was Bunk's "true birth year." Has Bunk's true birth year now been established beyond all dispute? First I've heard of it if so…
              > Robert Greenwood
              >
              >
              > --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Howard Rye <howard@> wrote:
              > >
              > > And Marili Morden.
              > >
              > > You would probably be interested in Cary Ginell¹s book Hot Jazz For Sale:
              > > Hollywood¹s Jazz Man Record Shop, published through lulu.com last year.
              > > Certainly recommendable to anyone interested in the West Coast scene in the
              > > 40s and 50s.
              >
            • Howard Rye
              I took the single reference to Mark Karoley as no more than a typo. Clearly this is one of several respects in which the book would have benefitted from a
              Message 6 of 7 , Feb 11, 2011
                I took the single reference to Mark Karoley as no more than a typo. Clearly
                this is one of several respects in which the book would have benefitted from
                a (competent) sub-editor. The other sort of course is entirely capable of
                making this sort of ³correction² for themselves! It is in the nature of
                self-publishing that there is no sub-editing and a book of this kind would
                hardly get published any other way these days.


                on 11/02/2011 11:40, Robert Greenwood at robertgreenwood_54uk@...
                wrote:

                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > My copy of this well-researched, and apparently self-published, book arrived
                > this week. It contains generous extracts from Dave Stuart's letters to Bill
                > Russell, and just enough from Bill for us to infer his opinion of the Yerba
                > Buena records. The author rightly gives overdue credit to Marili Morden but
                > achieves an act of gender reassignment in turning Mary Karoley, the first
                > person to record Bunk, into Mark Karoley, proving, I'd say, that the author
                > hasn't listened to those now easily-available recordings. He also uncritically
                > takes on the official line regarding Bunk's age, fully confident that 1889 was
                > Bunk's "true birth year." Has Bunk's true birth year now been established
                > beyond all dispute? First I've heard of it if so…
                > Robert Greenwood
                >
                > --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com <mailto:RedHotJazz%40yahoogroups.com> ,
                > Howard Rye <howard@...> wrote:
                >> >
                >> > And Marili Morden.
                >> >
                >> > You would probably be interested in Cary Ginell¹s book Hot Jazz For Sale:
                >> > Hollywood¹s Jazz Man Record Shop, published through lulu.com last year.
                >> > Certainly recommendable to anyone interested in the West Coast scene in the
                >> > 40s and 50s.
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >


                Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
                howard@...
                Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Robert
                ... It is in the nature of ... How true. A similar case is that of Mike Pointon & Ray Smith s long-awaited biography of Bill Russell. Rutger s said they would
                Message 7 of 7 , Feb 11, 2011
                  --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Howard Rye <howard@...> wrote:
                  It is in the nature of
                  > self-publishing that there is no sub-editing and a book of this kind would
                  > hardly get published any other way these days.

                  How true. A similar case is that of Mike Pointon & Ray Smith's long-awaited biography of Bill Russell. Rutger's said they would publish it, but then they didn't, and it's now in the hands of a local history publishers in New Orleans. It might appear soon but holding your breath is not recommended.
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