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Re: About the production of 78 RPM records - one correction

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  • hans.eekhoff
    All true what you say Randy, except that 1920 s Columbias (and later OKehs when Columbia owned the label) use an early plastic for their record surfaces, which
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 22, 2011
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      All true what you say Randy, except that 1920's Columbias (and later OKehs when Columbia owned the label) use an early plastic for their record surfaces, which is far less hydroscopic than shellac. Therefore these records are today still as smooth as they were 80 years ago - it has not so much to do with the lamination.
      Had Columbia used Victor's shellac for instance, the records (laminated or not) would now be as gritty as most Victors.
      Mind you, ALL records looked as nice and had as little surface noise as a laminated Columbia when they were bought new in the 1920's, and if they were kept in perfectly dry conditions they still do (I have a handful of Victors, Gennetts, Brunswicks etc. that have miraculously been preserved thus - they play like a new Columbia even when worn to V+).

      Hans Eekhoff

      --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "Randy Skretvedt" <forwardintothepast@...> wrote:
      >
      > As far as I know, the Columbia records with a cardboard core and laminated surface were introduced during WWII as a way to combat the shortage of shellac, which was used in paint and varnish. I have many OKeh pressings from the '20s, and they're heavy shellac with laminated surfaces. We're blessed that they were so well-recorded and manufactured; imagine how much the poorer we'd be if Bix and young Louis were only recorded by Paramount or Grey Gull! Columbia records from the '20s are also shellac with laminated surfaces. Victors have no lamination and as a result sound more crackly, but there are some laminated Australian pressings of Victor masters, which can sound much smoother than copies pressed in the USA.
      >
      > --Randy Skretvedt
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Mike Amato <vintagetenor@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Hi Mordechai,
      > >  
      > > If you are talking about the early OKeh label, a product of the General Record Co., then the production process would doubtless have been similar to that of the Victor Talking Machine Co.
      > >  
      > > Columbia purchased OKeh in 1924-25, and produced records with a cardboard core like those of the Columbia label.  I imagine that those involved a somewhat different process.
      > >  
      > > Mike
      > >  
      > >
      > > --- On Wed, 1/19/11, Mordechai Litzman <folke613@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > From: Mordechai Litzman <folke613@>
      > > Subject: [RedHotJazz] 1942 Victor movie about the production of 78 RPM records
      > > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
      > > Date: Wednesday, January 19, 2011, 10:23 PM
      > >
      > >
      > >  
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Came across this two part movie about how a 78 RPM record is made. I found it
      > > fascinating and would like to share it with the group. The title is in German,
      > > but the narration in impeccable English.
      > >
      > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tDKfgux0Fk&NR=1
      > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jutW-TgX16U&translated=1
      > >
      > > I am curious to know if a 1920's OKeh record was made using the same steps and
      > > process as in the Victor Camden plant.
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
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