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Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?

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  • Jack Grady
    Rob, Absolutely they did know each other and played in the same band. Your great-uncle Ben Pickering was in the Frank Guarente s World Known Georgians along
    Message 1 of 12 , Jun 17, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Rob,

      Absolutely they did know each other and played in the same band. Your great-uncle Ben Pickering was in the Frank Guarente's World Known Georgians along with my great-uncle Ted Noyes, who was the drummer for that group. They recorded a number of songs in Geneva, Switzerland for Kalophon. Only eight musicians, I think, so, no doubt they knew each other quite well.

      As far as the Dorseys go, I'll have to check out those photos. But, as far as I know, Ted spent even more time in Europe in the thirties than he did in the twenties, and he was there in the twenties quite often. I never heard of him playing with the Dorsey Brothers Band or with either of their separate bands. But, when Ted was playing drums for Billy Lustig's Scranton Sirens (and he was their main man on drums for a quite a while), one of the Dorseys joined the group (I think it was Jimmy). Later, he brought his other brother, Tommy, into the group. But this would have been back circa 1925, in the jazz era, when the Dorseys were young jazz musicians. Ted was more into jazz than the later swing, big-band style, and, in the 30s, he was continuing in that tradition (which he was part of in the 20s) in Europe. There's a lot more to Ted than just his drumming, but maybe I'll save that for a book.

      Anyway, I found the proof that Ted Noyes and Ben Pickering were together in Frank Guarente's World Known Georgians.

      My God, it's a small world. What a discovery!

      Jack




      ________________________________
      From: Rob <rbilleaud@...>
      To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thu, 17 June, 2010 18:29:22
      Subject: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?


      I don't think the photos I attached came through, must not accept attachments. In any case, I posted the photos in the Files section, so you can access them there. I tried to create an album in the photos section but the album showed up empty - I don't know if the photos have to be approved before they are posted or what.

      --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, RD Blackard <rdblackard@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi All!
      > Â
      > It was probably Lake Compounce, over in Bristol. Many of the bands played there.
      >
      > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Two cents from
      > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Bob Blackard
      > Â
      >                                      -  in sunny eastern Connecticut -
      > Â
      >
      > --- On Thu, 6/17/10, Rob Billeaud <rbilleaud@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > From: Rob Billeaud <rbilleaud@...>
      > Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?
      > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Thursday, June 17, 2010, 11:56 AM
      >
      >
      > Â
      >
      >
      >
      > Jack: I have two photos of Tommy Dorsey Orch. here, do you recognize your uncle in either one? I'm trying to put names with faces. For all I know, these may be before or after your uncle played with Tommy. I do know the smaller photo was taken in 1936 in Dallas, but that's all of the info I have. In the steel pier photo, my uncle is 6th from left and in the other he's immediately to Tommy's left.
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: Jack Grady <scara9mouche@...>
      > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Wed, June 16, 2010 1:28:06 PM
      > Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?
      >
      > Â
      > All of my stories come via my father, who knew his uncle Ted Noyes well. The only times I ever saw him, I was too young to remember. My father used to talk about some of the groups and musicians Ted played with and sang with (he also did some vocals as well as drumming). Another name besides Frank Guarente that comes to mind is Billy Lustig (of Scranton Sirens fame). Ted recorded with the Sirens in New Orleans. Ted also played with the Frank Guarente's main group, the Georgians, though Chauncey Morehouse seems have have been with them more often. Unfortunately for Ted, he spent more time in Europe in the 20s and 30s than in the States ('How Can You Keep Them Down on the Farm, After They've Seen Paree', right?), and, as a result he never got to become as big a name as someone like Morehouse.
      >
      > Like your great-uncle, Ted played with Tommy Dorsey, in fact, with both of the brothers and knew them well. I've got a story I can tell there. Jimmy Dorsey and his band were doing a gig at some amusement park in Connecticut. The name slips my mind now, but I was there myself a couple of decades later. I'll have to google for it. Anyway, my father went to the show. Either at the end of the show or between sets, my father went backstage to talk to Jimmy. Whoever greeted him told him Jimmy was busy or something else discouraging. But my father then said, tell Jimmy I'm Ted Noyes's nephew. Well, that did it. Jimmy came out and asked him all about Ted (who was in Europe at the time...This was in the late 30s). Anyway, Jimmy was taking the group to Boston to do a show. My father asked if he would give him a lift to Worcester, which was on the way. Well, they let my father ride with the equipment. In Worcester, whatever time they arrived, my
      > father took the whole band into his parents' house. His parents sent out for eggs and whatever else they could muster up and fed the whole band. In return, the band took out their instruments and played a few numbers for them (and no doubt a few neighbors were there to enjoy it too). Mrs. Dorsey wasn't the only one to feed a whole band breakfast.
      >
      > Jack
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: Rob <rbilleaud@...>
      > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Wed, 16 June, 2010 13:54:28
      > Subject: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?
      >
      > Jack,
      >
      > Sounds like you and I have something in common. My great uncle, Ben Pickering, was also in some of the first American jazz groups to come to Europe in the 1920's. He was a trombonist and arranger and was based primarily in Germany. He left me a treasure trove of old photos. I'm in the midst of my first real effort to go through, identify and scan these and post them to my website. The ones I currently have posted are of the more well known acts he was part of like, Jan Savitt, Rene Dumont and Tommy Dorsey, but in addition to those are some earlier photos of acts that he was part of that I either don't recognize or can't identify at all. Unfortunately, my uncle passed away in the early 1980's and by the time I came across these photos, he was in the last stages of dementia. Would have really been great to record the information when he was still lucid, we never really realize how much of our culture we lose in situations like that. I'll continue to
      > plug away and post updates here as I update my site.
      >
      > --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Jack Grady <scara9mouche@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Absolutely brilliant stuff. I remember hearing about these German groups back in the days of the Weimar Republic, before Hitler took over. My great-uncle was a drummer with one of the first American jazz groups to come to Europe and recorded in Geneva, Switzerland with Frank Guarente's World Known Georgians. His name was Ted Noyes. He told my father about all the great European musicians, in Paris, Berlin, and other place throughout the Continent.
      > >
      > > Really enjoyed this and would like to hear more of the European groups from the 20s and 30s.
      > >
      > > Jack
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ________________________________
      > > From: Alex Hill <axmhill1964@>
      > > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Tue, 15 June, 2010 18:16:14
      > > Subject: [RedHotJazz] die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?
      > >
      > >
      > > Hi, folks
      > >
      > > I was listening to the superb internet radio -Weimar Rundfunk - on Live365
      > > and came across this track "die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich
      > > bist" so looked for it on Youtube.
      > >
      > > Found it and it sounded very crackly which I understand it is the record
      > > itself that is somewhat old.
      > >
      > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-n26Aekzac
      > >
      > > die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist
      > >
      > > I was wondering whether there was a few variations of it as seen on another
      > > video on Youtube.
      > >
      > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yUtOS8ZkLk0
      > >
      > > I am also wondering whether the opening sequence of the sound is somewhat
      > > loosely similiar to the opening track of "I found a million dollar baby"
      > > Wonder whether the sound is borrowed or taken from this track despite the
      > > common place of so many bands playing the same song but slightly different
      > > tunes. You know what I mean !
      > >
      > > ta
      > >
      > > alex
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jack Grady
      As a postscript to my last message, check out Frank Guarente s World Known Georgians doing Hard-To-Get-Gerty. Ted Noyes was the vocalist as well as the
      Message 2 of 12 , Jun 17, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
        As a postscript to my last message, check out Frank Guarente's World Known Georgians doing Hard-To-Get-Gerty. Ted Noyes was the vocalist as well as the drummer on that one.

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_NmVraJGS0Y




        ________________________________
        From: Rob <rbilleaud@...>
        To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thu, 17 June, 2010 18:29:22
        Subject: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?


        I don't think the photos I attached came through, must not accept attachments. In any case, I posted the photos in the Files section, so you can access them there. I tried to create an album in the photos section but the album showed up empty - I don't know if the photos have to be approved before they are posted or what.

        --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, RD Blackard <rdblackard@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi All!
        > Â
        > It was probably Lake Compounce, over in Bristol. Many of the bands played there.
        >
        > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Two cents from
        > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Bob Blackard
        > Â
        >                                      -  in sunny eastern Connecticut -
        > Â
        >
        > --- On Thu, 6/17/10, Rob Billeaud <rbilleaud@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > From: Rob Billeaud <rbilleaud@...>
        > Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?
        > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Thursday, June 17, 2010, 11:56 AM
        >
        >
        > Â
        >
        >
        >
        > Jack: I have two photos of Tommy Dorsey Orch. here, do you recognize your uncle in either one? I'm trying to put names with faces. For all I know, these may be before or after your uncle played with Tommy. I do know the smaller photo was taken in 1936 in Dallas, but that's all of the info I have. In the steel pier photo, my uncle is 6th from left and in the other he's immediately to Tommy's left.
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: Jack Grady <scara9mouche@...>
        > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Wed, June 16, 2010 1:28:06 PM
        > Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?
        >
        > Â
        > All of my stories come via my father, who knew his uncle Ted Noyes well. The only times I ever saw him, I was too young to remember. My father used to talk about some of the groups and musicians Ted played with and sang with (he also did some vocals as well as drumming). Another name besides Frank Guarente that comes to mind is Billy Lustig (of Scranton Sirens fame). Ted recorded with the Sirens in New Orleans. Ted also played with the Frank Guarente's main group, the Georgians, though Chauncey Morehouse seems have have been with them more often. Unfortunately for Ted, he spent more time in Europe in the 20s and 30s than in the States ('How Can You Keep Them Down on the Farm, After They've Seen Paree', right?), and, as a result he never got to become as big a name as someone like Morehouse.
        >
        > Like your great-uncle, Ted played with Tommy Dorsey, in fact, with both of the brothers and knew them well. I've got a story I can tell there. Jimmy Dorsey and his band were doing a gig at some amusement park in Connecticut. The name slips my mind now, but I was there myself a couple of decades later. I'll have to google for it. Anyway, my father went to the show. Either at the end of the show or between sets, my father went backstage to talk to Jimmy. Whoever greeted him told him Jimmy was busy or something else discouraging. But my father then said, tell Jimmy I'm Ted Noyes's nephew. Well, that did it. Jimmy came out and asked him all about Ted (who was in Europe at the time...This was in the late 30s). Anyway, Jimmy was taking the group to Boston to do a show. My father asked if he would give him a lift to Worcester, which was on the way. Well, they let my father ride with the equipment. In Worcester, whatever time they arrived, my
        > father took the whole band into his parents' house. His parents sent out for eggs and whatever else they could muster up and fed the whole band. In return, the band took out their instruments and played a few numbers for them (and no doubt a few neighbors were there to enjoy it too). Mrs. Dorsey wasn't the only one to feed a whole band breakfast.
        >
        > Jack
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: Rob <rbilleaud@...>
        > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Wed, 16 June, 2010 13:54:28
        > Subject: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?
        >
        > Jack,
        >
        > Sounds like you and I have something in common. My great uncle, Ben Pickering, was also in some of the first American jazz groups to come to Europe in the 1920's. He was a trombonist and arranger and was based primarily in Germany. He left me a treasure trove of old photos. I'm in the midst of my first real effort to go through, identify and scan these and post them to my website. The ones I currently have posted are of the more well known acts he was part of like, Jan Savitt, Rene Dumont and Tommy Dorsey, but in addition to those are some earlier photos of acts that he was part of that I either don't recognize or can't identify at all. Unfortunately, my uncle passed away in the early 1980's and by the time I came across these photos, he was in the last stages of dementia. Would have really been great to record the information when he was still lucid, we never really realize how much of our culture we lose in situations like that. I'll continue to
        > plug away and post updates here as I update my site.
        >
        > --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Jack Grady <scara9mouche@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Absolutely brilliant stuff. I remember hearing about these German groups back in the days of the Weimar Republic, before Hitler took over. My great-uncle was a drummer with one of the first American jazz groups to come to Europe and recorded in Geneva, Switzerland with Frank Guarente's World Known Georgians. His name was Ted Noyes. He told my father about all the great European musicians, in Paris, Berlin, and other place throughout the Continent.
        > >
        > > Really enjoyed this and would like to hear more of the European groups from the 20s and 30s.
        > >
        > > Jack
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ________________________________
        > > From: Alex Hill <axmhill1964@>
        > > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
        > > Sent: Tue, 15 June, 2010 18:16:14
        > > Subject: [RedHotJazz] die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?
        > >
        > >
        > > Hi, folks
        > >
        > > I was listening to the superb internet radio -Weimar Rundfunk - on Live365
        > > and came across this track "die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich
        > > bist" so looked for it on Youtube.
        > >
        > > Found it and it sounded very crackly which I understand it is the record
        > > itself that is somewhat old.
        > >
        > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-n26Aekzac
        > >
        > > die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist
        > >
        > > I was wondering whether there was a few variations of it as seen on another
        > > video on Youtube.
        > >
        > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yUtOS8ZkLk0
        > >
        > > I am also wondering whether the opening sequence of the sound is somewhat
        > > loosely similiar to the opening track of "I found a million dollar baby"
        > > Wonder whether the sound is borrowed or taken from this track despite the
        > > common place of so many bands playing the same song but slightly different
        > > tunes. You know what I mean !
        > >
        > > ta
        > >
        > > alex
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Rob Billeaud
        Extremely cool!  I will go into my big box of old photos tonight and look to see if I can find any photos of Frank Guarente s Georgians. If I find any, I will
        Message 3 of 12 , Jun 17, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          Extremely cool!  I will go into my big box of old photos tonight and look to see if I can find any photos of Frank Guarente's Georgians. If I find any, I will be sure to scan them and send them along.




          ________________________________
          From: Jack Grady <scara9mouche@...>
          To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thu, June 17, 2010 4:15:21 PM
          Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?

           
          Rob,

          Absolutely they did know each other and played in the same band. Your great-uncle Ben Pickering was in the Frank Guarente's World Known Georgians along with my great-uncle Ted Noyes, who was the drummer for that group. They recorded a number of songs in Geneva, Switzerland for Kalophon. Only eight musicians, I think, so, no doubt they knew each other quite well.

          As far as the Dorseys go, I'll have to check out those photos. But, as far as I know, Ted spent even more time in Europe in the thirties than he did in the twenties, and he was there in the twenties quite often. I never heard of him playing with the Dorsey Brothers Band or with either of their separate bands. But, when Ted was playing drums for Billy Lustig's Scranton Sirens (and he was their main man on drums for a quite a while), one of the Dorseys joined the group (I think it was Jimmy). Later, he brought his other brother, Tommy, into the group. But this would have been back circa 1925, in the jazz era, when the Dorseys were young jazz musicians. Ted was more into jazz than the later swing, big-band style, and, in the 30s, he was continuing in that tradition (which he was part of in the 20s) in Europe. There's a lot more to Ted than just his drumming, but maybe I'll save that for a book.

          Anyway, I found the proof that Ted Noyes and Ben Pickering were together in Frank Guarente's World Known Georgians.

          My God, it's a small world. What a discovery!

          Jack

          ________________________________
          From: Rob <rbilleaud@...>
          To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thu, 17 June, 2010 18:29:22
          Subject: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?

          I don't think the photos I attached came through, must not accept attachments. In any case, I posted the photos in the Files section, so you can access them there. I tried to create an album in the photos section but the album showed up empty - I don't know if the photos have to be approved before they are posted or what.

          --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, RD Blackard <rdblackard@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi All!
          > Â
          > It was probably Lake Compounce, over in Bristol. Many of the bands played there.
          >
          > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Two cents from
          > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Bob Blackard
          > Â
          >                                      -  in sunny eastern Connecticut -
          > Â
          >
          > --- On Thu, 6/17/10, Rob Billeaud <rbilleaud@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > From: Rob Billeaud <rbilleaud@...>
          > Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?
          > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Thursday, June 17, 2010, 11:56 AM
          >
          >
          > Â
          >
          >
          >
          > Jack: I have two photos of Tommy Dorsey Orch. here, do you recognize your uncle in either one? I'm trying to put names with faces. For all I know, these may be before or after your uncle played with Tommy. I do know the smaller photo was taken in 1936 in Dallas, but that's all of the info I have. In the steel pier photo, my uncle is 6th from left and in the other he's immediately to Tommy's left.
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: Jack Grady <scara9mouche@...>
          > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Wed, June 16, 2010 1:28:06 PM
          > Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?
          >
          > Â
          > All of my stories come via my father, who knew his uncle Ted Noyes well. The only times I ever saw him, I was too young to remember. My father used to talk about some of the groups and musicians Ted played with and sang with (he also did some vocals as well as drumming). Another name besides Frank Guarente that comes to mind is Billy Lustig (of Scranton Sirens fame). Ted recorded with the Sirens in New Orleans. Ted also played with the Frank Guarente's main group, the Georgians, though Chauncey Morehouse seems have have been with them more often. Unfortunately for Ted, he spent more time in Europe in the 20s and 30s than in the States ('How Can You Keep Them Down on the Farm, After They've Seen Paree', right?), and, as a result he never got to become as big a name as someone like Morehouse.
          >
          > Like your great-uncle, Ted played with Tommy Dorsey, in fact, with both of the brothers and knew them well. I've got a story I can tell there. Jimmy Dorsey and his band were doing a gig at some amusement park in Connecticut. The name slips my mind now, but I was there myself a couple of decades later. I'll have to google for it. Anyway, my father went to the show. Either at the end of the show or between sets, my father went backstage to talk to Jimmy. Whoever greeted him told him Jimmy was busy or something else discouraging. But my father then said, tell Jimmy I'm Ted Noyes's nephew. Well, that did it. Jimmy came out and asked him all about Ted (who was in Europe at the time...This was in the late 30s). Anyway, Jimmy was taking the group to Boston to do a show. My father asked if he would give him a lift to Worcester, which was on the way. Well, they let my father ride with the equipment. In Worcester, whatever time they arrived, my
          > father took the whole band into his parents' house. His parents sent out for eggs and whatever else they could muster up and fed the whole band. In return, the band took out their instruments and played a few numbers for them (and no doubt a few neighbors were there to enjoy it too). Mrs. Dorsey wasn't the only one to feed a whole band breakfast.
          >
          > Jack
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: Rob <rbilleaud@...>
          > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Wed, 16 June, 2010 13:54:28
          > Subject: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?
          >
          > Jack,
          >
          > Sounds like you and I have something in common. My great uncle, Ben Pickering, was also in some of the first American jazz groups to come to Europe in the 1920's. He was a trombonist and arranger and was based primarily in Germany. He left me a treasure trove of old photos. I'm in the midst of my first real effort to go through, identify and scan these and post them to my website. The ones I currently have posted are of the more well known acts he was part of like, Jan Savitt, Rene Dumont and Tommy Dorsey, but in addition to those are some earlier photos of acts that he was part of that I either don't recognize or can't identify at all. Unfortunately, my uncle passed away in the early 1980's and by the time I came across these photos, he was in the last stages of dementia. Would have really been great to record the information when he was still lucid, we never really realize how much of our culture we lose in situations like that. I'll continue to
          > plug away and post updates here as I update my site.
          >
          > --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Jack Grady <scara9mouche@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Absolutely brilliant stuff. I remember hearing about these German groups back in the days of the Weimar Republic, before Hitler took over. My great-uncle was a drummer with one of the first American jazz groups to come to Europe and recorded in Geneva, Switzerland with Frank Guarente's World Known Georgians. His name was Ted Noyes. He told my father about all the great European musicians, in Paris, Berlin, and other place throughout the Continent.
          > >
          > > Really enjoyed this and would like to hear more of the European groups from the 20s and 30s.
          > >
          > > Jack
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > ________________________________
          > > From: Alex Hill <axmhill1964@>
          > > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
          > > Sent: Tue, 15 June, 2010 18:16:14
          > > Subject: [RedHotJazz] die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?
          > >
          > >
          > > Hi, folks
          > >
          > > I was listening to the superb internet radio -Weimar Rundfunk - on Live365
          > > and came across this track "die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich
          > > bist" so looked for it on Youtube.
          > >
          > > Found it and it sounded very crackly which I understand it is the record
          > > itself that is somewhat old.
          > >
          > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-n26Aekzac
          > >
          > > die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist
          > >
          > > I was wondering whether there was a few variations of it as seen on another
          > > video on Youtube.
          > >
          > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yUtOS8ZkLk0
          > >
          > > I am also wondering whether the opening sequence of the sound is somewhat
          > > loosely similiar to the opening track of "I found a million dollar baby"
          > > Wonder whether the sound is borrowed or taken from this track despite the
          > > common place of so many bands playing the same song but slightly different
          > > tunes. You know what I mean !
          > >
          > > ta
          > >
          > > alex
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Rob Billeaud
          Found only one photo of Ben that I can definitively say was taken while he was with the Georgians, I posted the photo (Ben and Eddie Bave) in the Files folder.
          Message 4 of 12 , Jun 17, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Found only one photo of Ben that I can definitively say was taken while he was with the Georgians, I posted the photo (Ben and Eddie Bave) in the Files folder.





            ________________________________
            From: Jack Grady <scara9mouche@...>
            To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thu, June 17, 2010 4:44:14 PM
            Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?


            As a postscript to my last message, check out Frank Guarente's World Known Georgians doing Hard-To-Get-Gerty. Ted Noyes was the vocalist as well as the drummer on that one.

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_NmVraJGS0Y

            ________________________________
            From: Rob <rbilleaud@...>
            To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Thu, 17 June, 2010 18:29:22
            Subject: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?

            I don't think the photos I attached came through, must not accept attachments. In any case, I posted the photos in the Files section, so you can access them there. I tried to create an album in the photos section but the album showed up empty - I don't know if the photos have to be approved before they are posted or what.

            --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, RD Blackard <rdblackard@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi All!
            > Â
            > It was probably Lake Compounce, over in Bristol. Many of the bands played there.
            >
            > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Two cents from
            > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Bob Blackard
            > Â
            >                                      -  in sunny eastern Connecticut -
            > Â
            >
            > --- On Thu, 6/17/10, Rob Billeaud <rbilleaud@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > From: Rob Billeaud <rbilleaud@...>
            > Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?
            > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Thursday, June 17, 2010, 11:56 AM
            >
            >
            > Â
            >
            >
            >
            > Jack: I have two photos of Tommy Dorsey Orch. here, do you recognize your uncle in either one? I'm trying to put names with faces. For all I know, these may be before or after your uncle played with Tommy. I do know the smaller photo was taken in 1936 in Dallas, but that's all of the info I have. In the steel pier photo, my uncle is 6th from left and in the other he's immediately to Tommy's left.
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: Jack Grady <scara9mouche@...>
            > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Wed, June 16, 2010 1:28:06 PM
            > Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?
            >
            > Â
            > All of my stories come via my father, who knew his uncle Ted Noyes well. The only times I ever saw him, I was too young to remember. My father used to talk about some of the groups and musicians Ted played with and sang with (he also did some vocals as well as drumming). Another name besides Frank Guarente that comes to mind is Billy Lustig (of Scranton Sirens fame). Ted recorded with the Sirens in New Orleans. Ted also played with the Frank Guarente's main group, the Georgians, though Chauncey Morehouse seems have have been with them more often. Unfortunately for Ted, he spent more time in Europe in the 20s and 30s than in the States ('How Can You Keep Them Down on the Farm, After They've Seen Paree', right?), and, as a result he never got to become as big a name as someone like Morehouse.
            >
            > Like your great-uncle, Ted played with Tommy Dorsey, in fact, with both of the brothers and knew them well. I've got a story I can tell there. Jimmy Dorsey and his band were doing a gig at some amusement park in Connecticut. The name slips my mind now, but I was there myself a couple of decades later. I'll have to google for it. Anyway, my father went to the show. Either at the end of the show or between sets, my father went backstage to talk to Jimmy. Whoever greeted him told him Jimmy was busy or something else discouraging. But my father then said, tell Jimmy I'm Ted Noyes's nephew. Well, that did it. Jimmy came out and asked him all about Ted (who was in Europe at the time...This was in the late 30s). Anyway, Jimmy was taking the group to Boston to do a show. My father asked if he would give him a lift to Worcester, which was on the way. Well, they let my father ride with the equipment. In Worcester, whatever time they arrived, my
            > father took the whole band into his parents' house. His parents sent out for eggs and whatever else they could muster up and fed the whole band. In return, the band took out their instruments and played a few numbers for them (and no doubt a few neighbors were there to enjoy it too). Mrs. Dorsey wasn't the only one to feed a whole band breakfast.
            >
            > Jack
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: Rob <rbilleaud@...>
            > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Wed, 16 June, 2010 13:54:28
            > Subject: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?
            >
            > Jack,
            >
            > Sounds like you and I have something in common. My great uncle, Ben Pickering, was also in some of the first American jazz groups to come to Europe in the 1920's. He was a trombonist and arranger and was based primarily in Germany. He left me a treasure trove of old photos. I'm in the midst of my first real effort to go through, identify and scan these and post them to my website. The ones I currently have posted are of the more well known acts he was part of like, Jan Savitt, Rene Dumont and Tommy Dorsey, but in addition to those are some earlier photos of acts that he was part of that I either don't recognize or can't identify at all. Unfortunately, my uncle passed away in the early 1980's and by the time I came across these photos, he was in the last stages of dementia. Would have really been great to record the information when he was still lucid, we never really realize how much of our culture we lose in situations like that. I'll continue to
            > plug away and post updates here as I update my site.
            >
            > --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Jack Grady <scara9mouche@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Absolutely brilliant stuff. I remember hearing about these German groups back in the days of the Weimar Republic, before Hitler took over. My great-uncle was a drummer with one of the first American jazz groups to come to Europe and recorded in Geneva, Switzerland with Frank Guarente's World Known Georgians. His name was Ted Noyes. He told my father about all the great European musicians, in Paris, Berlin, and other place throughout the Continent.
            > >
            > > Really enjoyed this and would like to hear more of the European groups from the 20s and 30s.
            > >
            > > Jack
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > ________________________________
            > > From: Alex Hill <axmhill1964@>
            > > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
            > > Sent: Tue, 15 June, 2010 18:16:14
            > > Subject: [RedHotJazz] die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?
            > >
            > >
            > > Hi, folks
            > >
            > > I was listening to the superb internet radio -Weimar Rundfunk - on Live365
            > > and came across this track "die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich
            > > bist" so looked for it on Youtube.
            > >
            > > Found it and it sounded very crackly which I understand it is the record
            > > itself that is somewhat old.
            > >
            > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-n26Aekzac
            > >
            > > die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist
            > >
            > > I was wondering whether there was a few variations of it as seen on another
            > > video on Youtube.
            > >
            > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yUtOS8ZkLk0
            > >
            > > I am also wondering whether the opening sequence of the sound is somewhat
            > > loosely similiar to the opening track of "I found a million dollar baby"
            > > Wonder whether the sound is borrowed or taken from this track despite the
            > > common place of so many bands playing the same song but slightly different
            > > tunes. You know what I mean !
            > >
            > > ta
            > >
            > > alex
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jack Grady
            Rob, The Georgians were a subgroup of the the Phil Specht Orchestra. The Phil Specht Orchestra was basically for dancing, whereas the Georgians were jazz. As
            Message 5 of 12 , Jun 18, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              Rob,

              The Georgians were a subgroup of the the Phil Specht Orchestra. The Phil Specht Orchestra was basically for dancing, whereas the Georgians were jazz. As I mentioned, Ted Noyes spent a lot of time in Europe (more in Europe than stateside). In Europe, the Georgians were called the World Known Georgians, and their drummer was Ted Noyes. Ben Pickering was on trombone. Stateside, though, Ted wasn't always the Georgians' drummer, for two, possibly three reasons. One was that he frequently stayed behind in Europe, and the second was that, when he was stateside, he was the regular drummer for Billy Lustig's Scranton Sirens. The third possible reason is that, athough Ted did play with the stateside version of the Georgians too, Chauncey Morehouse was often with the group, and Chauncey ended up being one of the biggest names in jazz drumming, for good reason. I can't say whether Ted was as good as Chauncey or not, but he certainly wasn't as well known; and
              part of the reason for that was his preference for Europe.

              I have a photo of Ted in uniform in my central hallway, and I remember seeing photos of him at my parents' wedding and and at my baptism. I'll have to see which of my relatives stateside (I live in Ireland now) might have ended up with those photos. In those photos, he was also in uniform. He retired as a colonel from the U.S. Army. He was in the military in both World Wars.

              I believe that the photo of the drummer on a picture of the Scranton Sirens on the net is him. I think that the photo of the drummer on the most famous photo of the Georgians is Chauncey Morehouse, though there might be photos of Ted with that group. If we had photos of the Georgians on European tour under the name of the World Known Georgians, we'd definitely have more photos of Ted. But good hunting on trying to dig up photos, and I'll keep my fingers crossed as well as continuing to trawl the net.

              Jack




              ________________________________
              From: Rob Billeaud <rbilleaud@...>
              To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thu, 17 June, 2010 21:54:18
              Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?


              Extremely cool! I will go into my big box of old photos tonight and look to see if I can find any photos of Frank Guarente's Georgians. If I find any, I will be sure to scan them and send them along.

              ________________________________
              From: Jack Grady <scara9mouche@...>
              To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thu, June 17, 2010 4:15:21 PM
              Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?


              Rob,

              Absolutely they did know each other and played in the same band. Your great-uncle Ben Pickering was in the Frank Guarente's World Known Georgians along with my great-uncle Ted Noyes, who was the drummer for that group. They recorded a number of songs in Geneva, Switzerland for Kalophon. Only eight musicians, I think, so, no doubt they knew each other quite well.

              As far as the Dorseys go, I'll have to check out those photos. But, as far as I know, Ted spent even more time in Europe in the thirties than he did in the twenties, and he was there in the twenties quite often. I never heard of him playing with the Dorsey Brothers Band or with either of their separate bands. But, when Ted was playing drums for Billy Lustig's Scranton Sirens (and he was their main man on drums for a quite a while), one of the Dorseys joined the group (I think it was Jimmy). Later, he brought his other brother, Tommy, into the group. But this would have been back circa 1925, in the jazz era, when the Dorseys were young jazz musicians. Ted was more into jazz than the later swing, big-band style, and, in the 30s, he was continuing in that tradition (which he was part of in the 20s) in Europe. There's a lot more to Ted than just his drumming, but maybe I'll save that for a book.

              Anyway, I found the proof that Ted Noyes and Ben Pickering were together in Frank Guarente's World Known Georgians.

              My God, it's a small world. What a discovery!

              Jack

              ________________________________
              From: Rob <rbilleaud@...>
              To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thu, 17 June, 2010 18:29:22
              Subject: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?

              I don't think the photos I attached came through, must not accept attachments. In any case, I posted the photos in the Files section, so you can access them there. I tried to create an album in the photos section but the album showed up empty - I don't know if the photos have to be approved before they are posted or what.

              --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, RD Blackard <rdblackard@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi All!
              > Â
              > It was probably Lake Compounce, over in Bristol. Many of the bands played there.
              >
              > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Two cents from
              > Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Â Bob Blackard
              > Â
              >                                      -  in sunny eastern Connecticut -
              > Â
              >
              > --- On Thu, 6/17/10, Rob Billeaud <rbilleaud@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > From: Rob Billeaud <rbilleaud@...>
              > Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?
              > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
              > Date: Thursday, June 17, 2010, 11:56 AM
              >
              >
              > Â
              >
              >
              >
              > Jack: I have two photos of Tommy Dorsey Orch. here, do you recognize your uncle in either one? I'm trying to put names with faces. For all I know, these may be before or after your uncle played with Tommy. I do know the smaller photo was taken in 1936 in Dallas, but that's all of the info I have. In the steel pier photo, my uncle is 6th from left and in the other he's immediately to Tommy's left.
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: Jack Grady <scara9mouche@...>
              > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Wed, June 16, 2010 1:28:06 PM
              > Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?
              >
              > Â
              > All of my stories come via my father, who knew his uncle Ted Noyes well. The only times I ever saw him, I was too young to remember. My father used to talk about some of the groups and musicians Ted played with and sang with (he also did some vocals as well as drumming). Another name besides Frank Guarente that comes to mind is Billy Lustig (of Scranton Sirens fame). Ted recorded with the Sirens in New Orleans. Ted also played with the Frank Guarente's main group, the Georgians, though Chauncey Morehouse seems have have been with them more often. Unfortunately for Ted, he spent more time in Europe in the 20s and 30s than in the States ('How Can You Keep Them Down on the Farm, After They've Seen Paree', right?), and, as a result he never got to become as big a name as someone like Morehouse.
              >
              > Like your great-uncle, Ted played with Tommy Dorsey, in fact, with both of the brothers and knew them well. I've got a story I can tell there. Jimmy Dorsey and his band were doing a gig at some amusement park in Connecticut. The name slips my mind now, but I was there myself a couple of decades later. I'll have to google for it. Anyway, my father went to the show. Either at the end of the show or between sets, my father went backstage to talk to Jimmy. Whoever greeted him told him Jimmy was busy or something else discouraging. But my father then said, tell Jimmy I'm Ted Noyes's nephew. Well, that did it. Jimmy came out and asked him all about Ted (who was in Europe at the time...This was in the late 30s). Anyway, Jimmy was taking the group to Boston to do a show. My father asked if he would give him a lift to Worcester, which was on the way. Well, they let my father ride with the equipment. In Worcester, whatever time they arrived, my
              > father took the whole band into his parents' house. His parents sent out for eggs and whatever else they could muster up and fed the whole band. In return, the band took out their instruments and played a few numbers for them (and no doubt a few neighbors were there to enjoy it too). Mrs. Dorsey wasn't the only one to feed a whole band breakfast.
              >
              > Jack
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: Rob <rbilleaud@...>
              > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Wed, 16 June, 2010 13:54:28
              > Subject: [RedHotJazz] Re: die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?
              >
              > Jack,
              >
              > Sounds like you and I have something in common. My great uncle, Ben Pickering, was also in some of the first American jazz groups to come to Europe in the 1920's. He was a trombonist and arranger and was based primarily in Germany. He left me a treasure trove of old photos. I'm in the midst of my first real effort to go through, identify and scan these and post them to my website. The ones I currently have posted are of the more well known acts he was part of like, Jan Savitt, Rene Dumont and Tommy Dorsey, but in addition to those are some earlier photos of acts that he was part of that I either don't recognize or can't identify at all. Unfortunately, my uncle passed away in the early 1980's and by the time I came across these photos, he was in the last stages of dementia. Would have really been great to record the information when he was still lucid, we never really realize how much of our culture we lose in situations like that. I'll continue to
              > plug away and post updates here as I update my site.
              >
              > --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Jack Grady <scara9mouche@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Absolutely brilliant stuff. I remember hearing about these German groups back in the days of the Weimar Republic, before Hitler took over. My great-uncle was a drummer with one of the first American jazz groups to come to Europe and recorded in Geneva, Switzerland with Frank Guarente's World Known Georgians. His name was Ted Noyes. He told my father about all the great European musicians, in Paris, Berlin, and other place throughout the Continent.
              > >
              > > Really enjoyed this and would like to hear more of the European groups from the 20s and 30s.
              > >
              > > Jack
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > ________________________________
              > > From: Alex Hill <axmhill1964@>
              > > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
              > > Sent: Tue, 15 June, 2010 18:16:14
              > > Subject: [RedHotJazz] die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist - different variations ?
              > >
              > >
              > > Hi, folks
              > >
              > > I was listening to the superb internet radio -Weimar Rundfunk - on Live365
              > > and came across this track "die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich
              > > bist" so looked for it on Youtube.
              > >
              > > Found it and it sounded very crackly which I understand it is the record
              > > itself that is somewhat old.
              > >
              > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-n26Aekzac
              > >
              > > die weintraub syncopators - ob du glucklich bist
              > >
              > > I was wondering whether there was a few variations of it as seen on another
              > > video on Youtube.
              > >
              > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yUtOS8ZkLk0
              > >
              > > I am also wondering whether the opening sequence of the sound is somewhat
              > > loosely similiar to the opening track of "I found a million dollar baby"
              > > Wonder whether the sound is borrowed or taken from this track despite the
              > > common place of so many bands playing the same song but slightly different
              > > tunes. You know what I mean !
              > >
              > > ta
              > >
              > > alex
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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