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more on Fred Rose

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  • Andrew
    Hi all, While reading Dave Jasen s liner notes to a Folkways LP entitled The Dancing Twenties , I came upon further reference to Fred Rose:
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 9, 2009
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      Hi all,

      While reading Dave Jasen's liner notes to a Folkways LP entitled "The Dancing Twenties", I came upon further reference to Fred Rose:

      http://media.smithsonianfolkways.org/liner_notes/folkways/FWRBF27.pdf

      "

      MOBILE BLUES was written by Fred Rose and Albert Short in the busy year of 1924. We'll meet up again with the talented Fred Rose at the end of this side [...]

      [...]

      RED HOT MAMA, as promised, was composed by the tunesmith who captured the spirit of the twenties regularly -- Fred Rose.
      Later he abandoned Tin Pan Alley for Nashville, Tennessee, where he became a partner in a publishing house specializing in hillbilly and country and Western tunes.

      "

      Here's the record so you can listen for yourself:

      http://www.folkways.si.edu/albumdetails.aspx?itemid=100

      I don't believe Rose is on any of the sides, although there are many other featured pianists, some quite obscure.

      RAGards,
      Andrew



      --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "Andrew" <rag1916@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > Mr. Rye and group,
      >
      > Thank you for the additional information on Cline Tindull! It's too bad he died so young; why did so many great pianists go like this???
      >
      > "The Arm Breaker" is listed in the "Checklist of 2,002 published rags" found in the back of the Dave Jasen and Gene Jones book, "That American Rag". Here's the listing, on page 344:
      >
      > title - composer - copyright date - publisher - place of publication
      >
      > Arm Breaker - Fred Rose - April 7, 1923 - Jack Mills - New York, NY
      >
      > In the bio of Clarence M. Jones in the same book, we find this sentence on page 86:
      >
      > [Clarence Jones] "was still dabbling in ragtime as late as 1926, when he and an augmented eight-piece Wonder Orchestra made a hot recording of Fred Rose's "The Arm Breaker" for OKeh."
      >
      > I have no idea if Fred Rose made a roll of this tune, although he did make one of "Deep Henderson":
      >
      > http://www.pianola.co.nz/rollscans/midi/DeepHenderson(1926)_Supertone-5812_ComposerFredRose.mid
      >
      > This is a really hot roll!
      >
      > Here are all the rolls by Fred Rose on which I could find information, courtesy Mike Montgomery's Columbia/Capitol and Supertone rollographies:
      >
      > [listed in order of release date of roll]
      >
      > December 1924
      >
      > Capitol 1013 Down Romany Way - fox trot
      >
      > 1926
      >
      > Capitol ???? I Wish You Were Jealous of Me - fox trot
      > [reissued as Supertone 5723]
      >
      > Capitol 1436 Say Mister! Have You Seen Rosie's Sister? - fox trot
      > [reissued as Supertone 5735]
      >
      > Capitol 1443 Only a Rose
      > [reissued as Supertone 5963]
      >
      > August 1926
      >
      > Capitol 1526 Deep Henderson - fox trot
      > [reissued as Supertone 5812]
      >
      > If Rose made a roll of the "Arm Breaker" it would probably have been for Columbia/Capitol's very poorly-documented 88-note instrumental series, which used a five-digit numbering system and is doubtless where things like Jimmy Blythe's "Fast Stuff Blues" and "Boogie Woogie Blues" were originally issued. To my knowledge, there is currently no listing of any rolls in this series, although making one is on my to-do list.
      >
      > Extant handplayed 88-note rolls in this series are extremely rare today, although the arranged rolls of marches etc. do turn up occasionally.
      >
      > RAGards,
      > Andrew Barrett
      >
      >
      > --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Howard Rye <howard@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Bob Eagle and I wrote up Cline Tindull (which was how he signed his name)
      > > for Names & Numbers 46. He was born 21 October 1899, died Chicago 4 May
      > > 1938, so I guess private recordings are pretty unlikely. The guys with the
      > > home recording equipment were mostly interested in what was fashionable.
      > >
      > > As the second pianist in Sammy Stewart¹s band he must have come in contact
      > > with pretty well everyone. His and Vance Dixon¹s recording bands are
      > > essentially small groups from Stewart¹s band (an old tradition).
      > >
      > > I also believe Fred Rose was white but have never actually researched this.
      > > Refresh my memory. How do we know that the Rose who composed Arm Breaker was
      > > Dave Rose? Is there a roll of it by him?
      > >
      > >
      >
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