Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [RedHotJazz] Frogspawn vol. 1 (Wells)

Expand Messages
  • Nick Dellow
    According to one reference, the lines:- There was an old woman who lived in a shoe She didn t have no children because she knowed what to do find their source
    Message 1 of 17 , Nov 9, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      According to one reference, the lines:-

      There was an old woman who lived in a shoe
      She didn't have no children because she knowed what to do

      find their source in the post-war spirit of the 1920s, though rhymes about
      "the old woman who lived in a shoe" have a lineage that stretches as least
      as far back as the start of the 1700s, where one finds a folk song that
      contains a line about an "old woman who lived under a hill". All such folk
      songs or rhymes seem to be obviously euphemistic in nature. It has been
      claimed that the "shoe" refers to the British Isles, though, not
      surprisingly, Italy has also been suggested. There are numerous
      contenders for the title of "the old woman", from Mother Goose to Queen
      Caroline, the wife of George II, who bore him eight children.



      2009/11/9 Howard Rye <howard@...>

      >
      >
      > The survival of English nursery rhymes in American and then in
      > African-American culture is a fascinating topic on which there must be some
      > literature.
      >
      > I was recently listening to a recording by Sam Chatmon in which Little Boy
      > Blue, Little Sally Walker, and Jack and Jill are all alluded to in one song
      > (Open Your Book, Your Daddy Got To Read With You, 1976, Mbirafon CD102).
      >
      > The survival of Jack and Jill no doubt has to do with its risque
      > undertones,
      > which are in the original though concealed from children (adults seem to
      > like in-jokes made at the expense of children's innocence). John Brunious
      > used to incorporate Jack and Jill verses into Shake That Thing and at the
      > Pizza Express, London on 27 October 2005 actually added a line about Jack
      > and Jill going up the hill and Jill coming down with $20, causing a mass
      > eruption amongst younger female members of the audience who had evidently
      > never thought of this before.
      >
      > All that said, I don't recall another reference to Old Mother Hubbard.
      > Which
      > proves absolutely nothing.
      >
      > on 08/11/2009 16:08, Michael Rader at Rader.Michael@...<Rader.Michael%40web.de>wrote:
      >
      > >> How can a woman live in a
      > >> shoe??? Can somebody tell me?
      > >
      > > Dear KB and anyone else who wants/needs to know:
      > > This refers (or paraphrases) a very old English nursery rhyme:
      > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/There_was_an_Old_Woman_Who_Lived_in_a_Shoe
      > >
      > > The article also addresses possible meanings. A while back, Howard Rye
      > pointed
      > > out that this was probably one of the first songs about birth control(!)
      > >
      > > Michael Rader
      > > Karlsruhe, Germany
      > > __________________________________________________________
      > > DSL-Preisknaller: DSL-Komplettpakete von WEB.DE <http://web.de/> schon
      > f�r
      > > 16,99 Euro/mtl.!* Hier klicken: http://produkte.web.de/go/02/
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      > Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
      > howard@... <howard%40coppermill.demon.co.uk>
      > Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • spacelights
      About Morris s 1926 Victor sides... kbrau44 is correct: The Mess-2 was in fact included on RCA FPM1 7049. Georgia Grind-2 has been listed (in Lord, and
      Message 2 of 17 , Nov 15, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        About Morris's 1926 Victor sides... kbrau44 is correct: The Mess-2 was in fact included on RCA FPM1 7049.

        Georgia Grind-2 has been listed (in Lord, and Storyville 2002-3) as appearing on Only For Collectors OFC 17. That release's printed cover does not list matrices; the one I examined included a handwritten "36047-2" for Georgia Grind, yet aurally it was the usual -3.

        Some of the instrumentals were reissued on 7" Swaggie and Natchez discs: I haven't heard those releases, nor Collector's Classics CC 49. The New Orleans Blue Five master takes also appeared on Herwin 107, wonderful album.

        Best wishes,

        John

        ps How speculative is Rust's firmly stated Morris/Nanton/Fuller/Shilkret/Waller with Six Hot Babies on 17 November 1926 (I'm guessing Victor files give instrumentation, and show Nat Shilkret present)? 'Fats In Fact' has Shilkret firmly on piano, and the rest named but uncertain. These lost performances followed Waller's first pipe organ sides: a momentous occasion (to me, anyway).

        --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "Michael" <Rader.Michael@...> wrote:
        >
        > The Morris sides on LP were something of a confusion. There were LPs on French RCA and Collectors Classics which partly overlapped and partly had different takes.
        >
        > The most significant question in this respect is currently: does the take contained on the Frogspawn complete Morris' instrumental output for Victor which was mainly on Frog DGF1, or are there still known takes missing?
      • kbrau44
        Hi John, I would also wish somebody to find alternate takes of Lazy Drag, Charleston Stampede and Georgia, but, until then, let´s be happy to have The Mess
        Message 3 of 17 , Nov 22, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi John, I would also wish somebody to find alternate takes of Lazy Drag, Charleston Stampede and Georgia, but, until then, let´s be happy to have The Mess -2.
          But, as you seem to be interested in Thomas Morris: you might also be interested in an article I have published in Names & Numbers #49 (Dutch discographical magazine) on the Th. Morris´ Past Jazz Masters with some unexpected finds (tpt players and pianist and others) K-B

          --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "spacelights" <spacelights@...> wrote:
          >
          > About Morris's 1926 Victor sides... kbrau44 is correct: The Mess-2 was in fact included on RCA FPM1 7049.
          >
          > Georgia Grind-2 has been listed (in Lord, and Storyville 2002-3) as appearing on Only For Collectors OFC 17. That release's printed cover does not list matrices; the one I examined included a handwritten "36047-2" for Georgia Grind, yet aurally it was the usual -3.
          >
          > Some of the instrumentals were reissued on 7" Swaggie and Natchez discs: I haven't heard those releases, nor Collector's Classics CC 49. The New Orleans Blue Five master takes also appeared on Herwin 107, wonderful album.
          >
          > Best wishes,
          >
          > John
          >
          > ps How speculative is Rust's firmly stated Morris/Nanton/Fuller/Shilkret/Waller with Six Hot Babies on 17 November 1926 (I'm guessing Victor files give instrumentation, and show Nat Shilkret present)? 'Fats In Fact' has Shilkret firmly on piano, and the rest named but uncertain. These lost performances followed Waller's first pipe organ sides: a momentous occasion (to me, anyway).
          >
          > --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "Michael" <Rader.Michael@> wrote:
          > >
          > > The Morris sides on LP were something of a confusion. There were LPs on French RCA and Collectors Classics which partly overlapped and partly had different takes.
          > >
          > > The most significant question in this respect is currently: does the take contained on the Frogspawn complete Morris' instrumental output for Victor which was mainly on Frog DGF1, or are there still known takes missing?
          >
        • spacelights
          Hi K-B: I haven t seen a copy of Names and Numbers, would very much like to read the article. The Past Jazz Masters are important and overlooked: I consider
          Message 4 of 17 , Nov 22, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi K-B:

            I haven't seen a copy of Names and Numbers, would very much like to read the article. The Past Jazz Masters are important and overlooked: I consider "Original Charleston Strut" as good as any jazz recording up to that time (circa February 1923), tenor break notwithstanding...

            As to personnel, the rich tenor lead towards the end of "Lonesome Journey Blues" sounds reminiscent of Hawkins: this evolving studio group seems to have included other Mamie Smith's Jazz Hounds as well. Fletcher Henderson (with Hawkins) would cover "Lonesome Journey Blues" and "The Bull Blues" in December 1923, so there are circumstantial links before and after.

            "When The Jazz Band Starts To Play" contains a strong open horn solo by the second cornetist, consistent with the open solo on Miley's "Those Blues". Early open Miley is something a problem, from lack of confirmed examples (identifying him on the 1921-22 Mamie Smiths also difficult for this reason). His tone does seem evident, and I hear distinct similarities to riffs and phrasing of his muted work with the Kansas City Five.

            On "Just Blues, That's All" (also covered by Henderson), a "Mr. Smith" is exhorted during the piano solo. Apparently one Charles Smith played piano the same month with Perry Bradford's Jazz Phools, on Paramount 12041 (Garvin Bushell and Bradford would each later recall Morris in print). It has marked Smith's only appearance in discography, which suggests recollection by a musician (Bradford?). However, the Jazz Phools pianist provides nearly inaudible rhythmic support only, making it difficult to gauge potential involvement with the Past Jazz Masters.

            Irvis would play club engagements with Willie "The Lion" Smith in late 1923; the latter denied involvement with these sides, also reportedly he was not in New York at the time.

            Fascinating subjects (to me anyway)...

            John

            --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "kbrau44" <kbrau44@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi John, I would also wish somebody to find alternate takes of Lazy Drag, Charleston Stampede and Georgia, but, until then, let´s be happy to have The Mess -2.
            > But, as you seem to be interested in Thomas Morris: you might also be interested in an article I have published in Names & Numbers #49 (Dutch discographical magazine) on the Th. Morris´ Past Jazz Masters with some unexpected finds (tpt players and pianist and others) K-B
          • kbrau44
            Hi John, thanks for your remarks. I´ll have to follow your guide line. Names & Numbers #49 with my article is available from : Stichting Names & Numbers,
            Message 5 of 17 , Nov 30, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi John, thanks for your remarks. I´ll have to follow your guide line.
              Names & Numbers #49 with my article is available from : Stichting Names & Numbers, Reine Claudestraat 15, 1326 JC Almere, The Netherlands.
              But in short: Bubber Miley is NOT on the first and second couplings, a trumpet player of the "western" (NO) style instead. Charlie Irvis is probably nowhere on these sides, on the first coupling is a hitherto unnoted tuba player, playing strong 4/4 beat (again NO?)as well as an alto player with a singing style just like from NO. So it made me phantasize if some of the Piron men .....? (But, see my article). The most important finds for me were, that it certainly is Charlie "Smitty" or "Fat Smitty" Smith on piano throughout, definitely!, and that Ernest Elliott, if it is him on the last coupling and possibly on tenor, is a much better musician than I ever thought.
              I have prepared a long list of Th. Morris recordings and am looking for somebody to discuss them. Interested? Best K-B

              --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "spacelights" <spacelights@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi K-B:
              >
              > I haven't seen a copy of Names and Numbers, would very much like to read the article. The Past Jazz Masters are important and overlooked: I consider "Original Charleston Strut" as good as any jazz recording up to that time (circa February 1923), tenor break notwithstanding...
              >
              > As to personnel, the rich tenor lead towards the end of "Lonesome Journey Blues" sounds reminiscent of Hawkins: this evolving studio group seems to have included other Mamie Smith's Jazz Hounds as well. Fletcher Henderson (with Hawkins) would cover "Lonesome Journey Blues" and "The Bull Blues" in December 1923, so there are circumstantial links before and after.
              >
              > "When The Jazz Band Starts To Play" contains a strong open horn solo by the second cornetist, consistent with the open solo on Miley's "Those Blues". Early open Miley is something a problem, from lack of confirmed examples (identifying him on the 1921-22 Mamie Smiths also difficult for this reason). His tone does seem evident, and I hear distinct similarities to riffs and phrasing of his muted work with the Kansas City Five.
              >
              > On "Just Blues, That's All" (also covered by Henderson), a "Mr. Smith" is exhorted during the piano solo. Apparently one Charles Smith played piano the same month with Perry Bradford's Jazz Phools, on Paramount 12041 (Garvin Bushell and Bradford would each later recall Morris in print). It has marked Smith's only appearance in discography, which suggests recollection by a musician (Bradford?). However, the Jazz Phools pianist provides nearly inaudible rhythmic support only, making it difficult to gauge potential involvement with the Past Jazz Masters.
              >
              > Irvis would play club engagements with Willie "The Lion" Smith in late 1923; the latter denied involvement with these sides, also reportedly he was not in New York at the time.
              >
              > Fascinating subjects (to me anyway)...
              >
              > John
              >
              > --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "kbrau44" <kbrau44@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Hi John, I would also wish somebody to find alternate takes of Lazy Drag, Charleston Stampede and Georgia, but, until then, let´s be happy to have The Mess -2.
              > > But, as you seem to be interested in Thomas Morris: you might also be interested in an article I have published in Names & Numbers #49 (Dutch discographical magazine) on the Th. Morris´ Past Jazz Masters with some unexpected finds (tpt players and pianist and others) K-B
              >
            • spacelights
              Thanks very much K-B, I look forward to reading the article. I think I hear Miley s distinctive tone on E Flat Blues No. 2 (compare to Carolina Blues by Mamie
              Message 6 of 17 , Dec 7, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                Thanks very much K-B, I look forward to reading the article.

                I think I hear Miley's distinctive tone on E Flat Blues No. 2 (compare to Carolina Blues by Mamie Smith's Jazz Hounds, a year earlier) and some characteristic phrases on Original Charleston Strut (up to and including the open break). Yes, I do hear brass bass on these... It's listed on Fountain FJ-113/Swaggie 805: in his notes, Rains considers it unlike that on the final session, for which he suggests Harry Hull.

                By 1923, I would hesitate to identify unknown players regionally, due to multifold influences of records and touring (indeed, by then we have influences of influences, a hall of mirrors). Miley had heard King Oliver live in Chicago as early as 1921, which reportedly made a strong impression.

                Where did the identification of "Fat Smitty" with the Blue Rhythm Orchestra originate? As with the Bradford Jazz Phools "Charles Smith", the piano is strictly rhythmic.

                I'd be happy to discuss Morris and related musicians, although current busy involvement in other projects might limit my participation somewhat.

                Best,

                John

                --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "kbrau44" <kbrau44@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi John, thanks for your remarks. I´ll have to follow your guide line.
                > Names & Numbers #49 with my article is available from : Stichting Names & Numbers, Reine Claudestraat 15, 1326 JC Almere, The Netherlands.
                > But in short: Bubber Miley is NOT on the first and second couplings, a trumpet player of the "western" (NO) style instead. Charlie Irvis is probably nowhere on these sides, on the first coupling is a hitherto unnoted tuba player, playing strong 4/4 beat (again NO?)as well as an alto player with a singing style just like from NO. So it made me phantasize if some of the Piron men .....? (But, see my article). The most important finds for me were, that it certainly is Charlie "Smitty" or "Fat Smitty" Smith on piano throughout, definitely!, and that Ernest Elliott, if it is him on the last coupling and possibly on tenor, is a much better musician than I ever thought.
                > I have prepared a long list of Th. Morris recordings and am looking for somebody to discuss them. Interested? Best K-B
              • yves francois
                John and K- B      I have been listening to the 1923 sides to quite some detail in the last week or two - excellent jazz, some of the best in NYC at that
                Message 7 of 17 , Dec 9, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  John and K- B
                       I have been listening to the 1923 sides to quite some detail in the last week or two - excellent jazz, some of the best in NYC at that point in time (and really some of the best jazz ever). There is a need for a proper CD reissue of this material - the best so far is still the FOUNTAIN LP FJ-113. By the way the first session on the LP liner notes and personnel note the brass bass and drums.   
                     I agree with K B regarding the trombone (almost certainly not Irvis)- and notice that the trombonist on the first two sessions is in the pure New Orleans style - wonderful glissando's, worthy of ANYONE who recorded up to that time - and it makes all the difference to the music. The trombonist on the later 2 sessions IS a different man, however, listen to his playing and you will hear the difference. BTW John, the second trumpet on the first two sessions sounds like Miley to me as well. Miley seems to me (or am I crazy) to be the wonderful straight muted solo on '...Charleston" and some lead work on the "E flat Blues #2" )- I feel that the first coupling is the best jazz before the CJB recorded BTW - that's how much I like these sessions. Of course it is Morris' on the incredible solo on "Lonesome Journey Blues" is it actually stunning - one of the greatest trumpet solos on record - you can hear while Miley comes from in his mute work - but with
                  differences in phrasing etc. Is
                  it  Miley (or whom) on "When The Jazz Band Starts To Play" on the April 1923 session - unlike the first coupling I do not hear it as necessarily Miley, but it sure can be.
                     Any comments - K B, John, and another question - how did the personnel listing came for these sessions anyways? Just wondering on this point
                  all the best - and I am very interested to discuss Morris at greater length ...
                  Yves Francois

                  --- On Mon, 12/7/09, spacelights <spacelights@...> wrote:

                  From:
                  spacelights <spacelights@...>
                  Subject: [RedHotJazz] 1923 Morris Past Jazz Masters (was Re: Frogspawn vol. 1)
                  To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Monday, December 7, 2009, 4:54 PM
                   
                        Thanks very much K-B, I look forward to reading the article.



                  I think I hear Miley's distinctive tone on E Flat Blues No. 2 (compare to Carolina Blues by Mamie Smith's Jazz Hounds, a year earlier) and some characteristic phrases on Original Charleston Strut (up to and including the open break).  Yes, I do hear brass bass on these...  It's listed on Fountain FJ-113/Swaggie 805:  in his notes, Rains considers it unlike that on the final session, for which he suggests Harry Hull.



                  By 1923, I would hesitate to identify unknown players regionally, due to multifold influences of records and touring (indeed, by then we have influences of influences, a hall of mirrors).  Miley had heard King Oliver live in Chicago as early as 1921, which reportedly made a strong impression.



                  Where did the identification of "Fat Smitty" with the Blue Rhythm Orchestra originate?  As with the Bradford Jazz Phools "Charles Smith", the piano is strictly rhythmic.



                  I'd be happy to discuss Morris and related musicians, although current busy involvement in other projects might limit my participation somewhat.



                  Best,



                  John



                  --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogro ups.com, "kbrau44" <kbrau44@... > wrote:

                  >

                  > Hi John, thanks for your remarks. I´ll have to follow your guide line.

                  > Names & Numbers #49 with my article is available from : Stichting Names & Numbers, Reine Claudestraat 15, 1326 JC Almere, The Netherlands.

                  > But in short: Bubber Miley is NOT on the first and second couplings, a trumpet player of the "western" (NO) style instead.  Charlie Irvis is probably nowhere on these sides, on the first coupling is a hitherto unnoted tuba player, playing strong 4/4 beat (again NO?)as well as an alto player with a singing style just like from NO. So it made me phantasize if some of the Piron men .....? (But, see my article).  The most important finds for me were, that it certainly is Charlie "Smitty" or "Fat Smitty" Smith on piano throughout, definitely!, and that Ernest Elliott, if it is him on the last coupling and possibly on tenor, is a much better musician than I ever thought.

                  > I have prepared a long list of Th. Morris recordings and am looking for somebody to discuss them. Interested?   Best  K-B
                • Mordechai Litzman
                  You are asking for a proper CD reissue - Classic Records 823 (France) has a CD that has all Thomas Morris recordings in chronological order from 1923-1926, but
                  Message 8 of 17 , Dec 10, 2009
                  • 0 Attachment
                    You are asking for a proper CD reissue - Classic Records 823 (France) has a CD that has all Thomas Morris recordings in chronological order from 1923-1926, but no alternate recordings. However, there are no linear notes at all; no personnel listed; only the dates.
                    I note that RHJA has alternate takes available on the 1926 recordings, but almost all the 1923 recordings are missing.




                    ________________________________
                    From: yves francois <aprestitine@...>
                    To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Wed, December 9, 2009 11:07:44 AM
                    Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] 1923 Morris Past Jazz Masters (was Re: Frogspawn vol. 1)


                    John and K- B
                    I have been listening to the 1923 sides to quite some detail in the last week or two - excellent jazz, some of the best in NYC at that point in time (and really some of the best jazz ever). There is a need for a proper CD reissue of this material - the best so far is still the FOUNTAIN LP FJ-113. By the way the first session on the LP liner notes and personnel note the brass bass and drums.




                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.