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RE: [RedHotJazz] BUDDY CHRISTIAN CREOLE FIVE

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  • David Brown
    Hi Yves Right about Tom Morris being almost two players. Never at his best when required to follow an arrangement -- I doubt he actually read -- he blossoms
    Message 1 of 27 , Oct 12, 2009
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      Hi Yves

      Right about Tom Morris being almost two players. Never at his best when
      required to follow an arrangement -- I doubt he actually read -- he blossoms
      with the freedom of looser context.

      Aiken I have chronologically nearest to the Creoles on another Clara, 30
      July 1927 and on a Bradford, 16 Feb 1927. The work on the latter session,
      especially 'All That I Had Is Gone', is good but the phrasing and
      articulation are slower and heavier than on the Creoles. Compare the work
      leading out 'All That --' with that leading out 'Texas Mule' and this is
      obviously a different player. The player on the Johnsons is impressive but
      rhythmically stiff and I note the almost parody of period growl. Elsewhere
      Aiken is hard to find with no less than seven sessions in Rust as ? or poss.
      and one wonders just how useful these attributions are.

      I still cannot hear Cooper as showing particular rhythmic freedom at this
      stage. But I have dug out some sides he made in Paris during the war. And I
      wonder how he was not interned ? The playing here is much more technically
      impressive, rhythmically freer and flowing. He does not sound as
      anachronistic as one might expect after expatriation in Europe since 1928.
      There were at least two sessions in Paris, one 1942 under Fouad and one 1943
      under Rostaing. Are they anywhere available complete ? Are there any further
      later examples of his playing ?

      I also hit the almost contemporary 1941 Aiken session with Bechet. Not so
      impressive, overrun by Bechet and rather ragged but nice on 'Sleepy Time'
      which I guess he had a chance to absorb in the Louis big band.

      Dave





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • jtdyamond
      Hi David and others: It s members of the Jimmy Wade Orchestra (including Wade himself, c, and Arnett Nelson, cl) with possibly JP Johnson on p, on the 16 Feb
      Message 2 of 27 , Oct 12, 2009
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        Hi David and others:

        It's members of the Jimmy Wade Orchestra (including Wade himself, c, and Arnett Nelson, cl) with possibly JP Johnson on p, on the 16 Feb 1927 Bradford session. The Aiken Brothers, Gus and Eugene, were on the Paramount Bradford session recorded c. May 1923 (Fade Away Blues/Day Break Blues). You can also find early Aiken on a number of Black Swan sides associated with Ethel Waters, recorded in 1921 (see Hendersonia) - and early 1922 - but only before EW's southern tour in 1922 however.

        J.T. Dyamond

        --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "David Brown" <johnhaleysims@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Yves
        >
        > Right about Tom Morris being almost two players. Never at his best when
        > required to follow an arrangement -- I doubt he actually read -- he blossoms
        > with the freedom of looser context.
        >
        > Aiken I have chronologically nearest to the Creoles on another Clara, 30
        > July 1927 and on a Bradford, 16 Feb 1927. The work on the latter session,
        > especially 'All That I Had Is Gone', is good but the phrasing and
        > articulation are slower and heavier than on the Creoles. Compare the work
        > leading out 'All That --' with that leading out 'Texas Mule' and this is
        > obviously a different player. The player on the Johnsons is impressive but
        > rhythmically stiff and I note the almost parody of period growl. Elsewhere
        > Aiken is hard to find with no less than seven sessions in Rust as ? or poss.
        > and one wonders just how useful these attributions are.
        >
        > I still cannot hear Cooper as showing particular rhythmic freedom at this
        > stage. But I have dug out some sides he made in Paris during the war. And I
        > wonder how he was not interned ? The playing here is much more technically
        > impressive, rhythmically freer and flowing. He does not sound as
        > anachronistic as one might expect after expatriation in Europe since 1928.
        > There were at least two sessions in Paris, one 1942 under Fouad and one 1943
        > under Rostaing. Are they anywhere available complete ? Are there any further
        > later examples of his playing ?
        >
        > I also hit the almost contemporary 1941 Aiken session with Bechet. Not so
        > impressive, overrun by Bechet and rather ragged but nice on 'Sleepy Time'
        > which I guess he had a chance to absorb in the Louis big band.
        >
        > Dave
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • David Brown
        Hello J.T. Nice to hear. Thanks. Rust (1969) has Aiken firmly in place alongside J.P.J. on the Bradford. How did this ever get running then ? Although I do
        Message 3 of 27 , Oct 13, 2009
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          Hello J.T. Nice to hear.

          Thanks. Rust (1969) has Aiken firmly in place alongside J.P.J. on the
          Bradford. How did this ever get running then ? Although I do not have the
          April 1927 Gennetts for comparison, I believe you and was puzzling
          yesterday as to the clarinet. Ah Arnett !

          I think this supports my scepticism on Aiken, and other, Rustian
          attributions.

          There is very little piano to be heard and the placement of J.P.J. here must
          also then be questionable.

          Dave





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        • spacelights
          Thanks for starting this thread, Yves... At the risk of over-speculation and attendant projections, I suspect the second cornetist on the Gulf Coast Seven s
          Message 4 of 27 , Oct 13, 2009
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            Thanks for starting this thread, Yves...

            At the risk of over-speculation and attendant projections, I suspect the second cornetist on the Gulf Coast Seven's "Papa Better Watch Your Step" and "Memphis Tennessee" is Morris... These were made the same day as the final Morris Past Jazz Masters session. He seems to have been a casual participant in the GCS: Gus Aiken plays the primary cornet parts, to which (probably) Morris lends sporadic support. A photo caption in Perry Bradford's memoir 'Born With The Blues' (1965) refers to Thomas Morris simply as "jazz cornet master".

            I agree the Charlie Johnson "Meddlin' With The Blues" is a fascinating period piece: some elaborate arrangement, yes, but I think it works. The listed second cornetist Leroy Rutledge's only other known sessions are those two Ellington dates with Harry Cooper.

            Best wishes,

            John

            --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, yves francois <aprestitine@...> wrote:
            >
            > May I suggest listening to one other trumpet and that's Gus Aiken - comparing to the 1923 Gulf Coast Seven sides, and the 1925 Charlie Johnson Emerson (a great record for the trumpet and trombone work on it - is Aiken defiantly on this?), try the "Papa Better Watch Your Step" by the GCS, or either Johnson's from 1925 (esp the breaks on the "Meddlin With The Blues" - about 40 seconds in - shame about the over arranged moments on what could of been a fantastic record).
          • spacelights
            Is Margaret Carter a pseudonym for Margaret Johnson (or vice versa)? Listening to the latter s When A Gator Hollers, Folks Say It s A Sign Of Rain and
            Message 5 of 27 , Oct 13, 2009
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              Is Margaret Carter a pseudonym for Margaret Johnson (or vice versa)? Listening to the latter's "When A 'Gator Hollers, Folks Say It's A Sign Of Rain" and "Graysom Street Blues" (20 October 1926), the voice and delivery sound quite similar.

              It's interesting to compare the the Jazz Rippers "South Rampart Street Blues" to a version by the New Orleans Blue Five two or three months later. Indeed, it indicates that the Rippers cornetist could be Morris after all, "Big Charlie Thomas" whimsy notwithstanding. The cornet solo and out-chorus on "The Skunk" sound markedly similar to Morris's work (especially his out-chorus lead) on "'Tain't Nobody's Bus'ness If I Do" with Clarence Williams in 1923.

              There are similarities to Charlie Gaines's (under-recorded) solo in Elvira Johnson's "How Could I Be Blue?" (June 1926), yet it seems almost too coincidental that the great diminutive Charlie Irvis plays along with Margaret Carter's "Big Charlie" exhortation--he repeats some descending figures just before her shout.

              Best regards,

              John
            • David Brown
              Hello John Thanks. Several interesting points there. The notes to the Big Charlie have indeed Carter and Johnson as one and the same. I have the N.O. Blue 5
              Message 6 of 27 , Oct 14, 2009
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                Hello John

                Thanks. Several interesting points there. The notes to the 'Big Charlie'
                have indeed Carter and Johnson as one and the same.

                I have the N.O. Blue 5 'South Rampart' in my ears now and super work from
                wonderful Tom Morris. But, respect him and you though I do, he is not on the
                Rippers nor on any other of the sides on the 'Big Charlie' except those
                alongside Jabbo --- yes I know, Jabbo. 'Big Charlie' has far more chops, is
                faster, lighter and, above all, shows profound Louis influence which Tom
                never did. Also no use of mutes. I dug into 'Big Charlie' a few years back
                and convinced myself that most of the sides on the album are by one man. All
                other known possibilities, including Gaines, I eventually excluded. Coming
                back to the album after a time, I still find it mostly convincing -- except
                the Jabbos.

                The physical appearance of the man remembered by Eva Taylor sounds
                strikingly close to Tom Morris, as does the name. My guess would be that
                when played the side she, probably not being very interested nor having ears
                to distinguish one cornet from another, misremembered Tom. But I would like
                to think that whoever put the question -- where ? -- went on to exclude the
                obvious, Morris. The 'Big Charlie' shout might yet again merely be a
                fabrication to add 'colour'. Irvis is also supposedly on the Rippers but the
                shout is at the end of a cornet solo and Charlie Irvis was very small. Maybe
                an in-joke ?

                But I have one very hypothetical and circumstantial candidate for Big
                Charlie. At the time of the Rippers session, according to Rust, Irvis was in
                the Ellington band along with a trumpeter, Charlie Johnson, who coincidently
                replaced Harry Cooper. I agree that I here make the assumption that the band
                on record was also the working band. Charlie Johnson also appears on
                (rejected) record in London with Leon Abbey, also coincidentally alongside
                Harry Cooper, in January 1928 so I assume left USA with Abbey sometime in
                1927. Apparently he remained in Europe for he was imported from Paris for
                Louis' UK touring band in 1933. He also appears on two Freddy Taylor Paris
                sessions in 1935. His expatriation would account for the total disappearance
                of 'Big Charlie' from the NYC studios from early 1927.

                He also recorded with Buddy Featherstonhaugh's Cosmopolitans, London 1933.
                The solo on 'I've Got The World On A String' is probably him for, although
                it is a three trumpet section, the others are Brits. There is not much here
                for comparison, especially as he plays in tight mute, but there is enough to
                observe that he has a fluent style not anomalous with that of Big Charlie.

                He also appears in Rust on two sides by Bill Brown And His Brownies NYC
                March 1927. I conjecture the muted work on these sides as the other
                trumpeter, listed as Billy Hicks, BUT at about 2.22 on 'Hot Lips',
                especially take -1, there bursts out a bravura trumpeter who leads us out.
                Nothing totally compatible with the supposed Big Charlies but near enough
                for speculation. Which is all this is.

                Too much to expect there are any biographical details at all with such a
                common name. Also I assume that all these Charlie Johnsons are the same man.

                All Best

                Dave




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Howard Rye
                Charlie Johnson came to Europe with Leon Abbey in 1927, arriving at Southampton on 14 December. According to the passenger list, he was 30. He was not a member
                Message 7 of 27 , Oct 14, 2009
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                  Charlie Johnson came to Europe with Leon Abbey in 1927, arriving at
                  Southampton on 14 December. According to the passenger list, he was 30. He
                  was not a member of Abbey¹s band on his previous trip to South America, from
                  which the band arrived back on 28 September.

                  He left Freddy Taylor in summer 1935 to go Bombay with Leon Abbey. At the
                  end of 1936 he was leading at the Villa d¹Este in Paris but reported laid up
                  with rheumatic ailments and when the band had to move to The Chantilly after
                  a fire in the Villa d¹Este on Christmas morning it was actually being led by
                  trumpeter Jimmie Bell.

                  His problem was obviously worse than rheumatic ailments and he died in the
                  American Hospital at Neuilly on 24 March 1937 in consequence of a kidney
                  operation.

                  He could obviously use a spot more research.



                  on 14/10/2009 11:30, David Brown at johnhaleysims@... wrote:

                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Hello John
                  >
                  > Thanks. Several interesting points there. The notes to the 'Big Charlie'
                  > have indeed Carter and Johnson as one and the same.
                  >
                  > I have the N.O. Blue 5 'South Rampart' in my ears now and super work from
                  > wonderful Tom Morris. But, respect him and you though I do, he is not on the
                  > Rippers nor on any other of the sides on the 'Big Charlie' except those
                  > alongside Jabbo --- yes I know, Jabbo. 'Big Charlie' has far more chops, is
                  > faster, lighter and, above all, shows profound Louis influence which Tom
                  > never did. Also no use of mutes. I dug into 'Big Charlie' a few years back
                  > and convinced myself that most of the sides on the album are by one man. All
                  > other known possibilities, including Gaines, I eventually excluded. Coming
                  > back to the album after a time, I still find it mostly convincing -- except
                  > the Jabbos.
                  >
                  > The physical appearance of the man remembered by Eva Taylor sounds
                  > strikingly close to Tom Morris, as does the name. My guess would be that
                  > when played the side she, probably not being very interested nor having ears
                  > to distinguish one cornet from another, misremembered Tom. But I would like
                  > to think that whoever put the question -- where ? -- went on to exclude the
                  > obvious, Morris. The 'Big Charlie' shout might yet again merely be a
                  > fabrication to add 'colour'. Irvis is also supposedly on the Rippers but the
                  > shout is at the end of a cornet solo and Charlie Irvis was very small. Maybe
                  > an in-joke ?
                  >
                  > But I have one very hypothetical and circumstantial candidate for Big
                  > Charlie. At the time of the Rippers session, according to Rust, Irvis was in
                  > the Ellington band along with a trumpeter, Charlie Johnson, who coincidently
                  > replaced Harry Cooper. I agree that I here make the assumption that the band
                  > on record was also the working band. Charlie Johnson also appears on
                  > (rejected) record in London with Leon Abbey, also coincidentally alongside
                  > Harry Cooper, in January 1928 so I assume left USA with Abbey sometime in
                  > 1927. Apparently he remained in Europe for he was imported from Paris for
                  > Louis' UK touring band in 1933. He also appears on two Freddy Taylor Paris
                  > sessions in 1935. His expatriation would account for the total disappearance
                  > of 'Big Charlie' from the NYC studios from early 1927.
                  >
                  > He also recorded with Buddy Featherstonhaugh's Cosmopolitans, London 1933.
                  > The solo on 'I've Got The World On A String' is probably him for, although
                  > it is a three trumpet section, the others are Brits. There is not much here
                  > for comparison, especially as he plays in tight mute, but there is enough to
                  > observe that he has a fluent style not anomalous with that of Big Charlie.
                  >
                  > He also appears in Rust on two sides by Bill Brown And His Brownies NYC
                  > March 1927. I conjecture the muted work on these sides as the other
                  > trumpeter, listed as Billy Hicks, BUT at about 2.22 on 'Hot Lips',
                  > especially take -1, there bursts out a bravura trumpeter who leads us out.
                  > Nothing totally compatible with the supposed Big Charlies but near enough
                  > for speculation. Which is all this is.
                  >
                  > Too much to expect there are any biographical details at all with such a
                  > common name. Also I assume that all these Charlie Johnsons are the same man.
                  >
                  > All Best
                  >
                  > Dave
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >>
                  >
                  >
                  > Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
                  > howard@...
                  > Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098
                  >



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • spacelights
                  Hi Dave, The Big Charlie Thomas agenda seems something of a red herring... the name itself speculative, a conflation of disparate elements. Attributions of
                  Message 8 of 27 , Oct 14, 2009
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                    Hi Dave,

                    The "Big Charlie Thomas" agenda seems something of a red herring... the name itself speculative, a conflation of disparate elements. Attributions of Charlie Gaines and Thomas Morris on the Jazz Rippers (in Rust 3 and 4, respectively) imbue identifications of "Charlie Thomas" with a kind of winking caprice... In any case, the "Thomas" recalled by Eva as "a much older man than the rest of us" would seem to discount Gaines, Morris, and new candidate Johnson: from all evidence, younger than Eva and Clarence. I don't have the Timeless CD, would like to read the notes and listen in sequence (have heard most of the sides on other releases).

                    I don't necessarily agree that the Rippers cornetist has "far more chops" than Morris: the former seems rather more brash and round-toned, yet his results I find even more erratic than typical Morris (who displays creditable chops in various bags on the Williams Stompers, Wallers, Dixie Jazzers Washboard Bands and elsewhere). Morris is strangely workmanlike under his own leadership in 1926 (OKeh was reportedly more accomodating than Victor) and seems to cut loose and experiment more with others. I agree the Rippers man sounds more Armstrong-influenced--not unlike Gaines at that time--though it's perhaps worth noting that the N.O. Blue Five date includes "King of the Zulus".

                    Best wishes,

                    John

                    ps Have you heard the Elvira Johnson...?


                    --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "David Brown" <johnhaleysims@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I have the N.O. Blue 5 'South Rampart' in my ears now and super work from
                    > wonderful Tom Morris. But, respect him and you though I do, he is not on the
                    > Rippers nor on any other of the sides on the 'Big Charlie' except those
                    > alongside Jabbo --- yes I know, Jabbo. 'Big Charlie' has far more chops, is
                    > faster, lighter and, above all, shows profound Louis influence which Tom
                    > never did. Also no use of mutes. I dug into 'Big Charlie' a few years back
                    > and convinced myself that most of the sides on the album are by one man. All
                    > other known possibilities, including Gaines, I eventually excluded. Coming
                    > back to the album after a time, I still find it mostly convincing -- except
                    > the Jabbos.
                    >
                    > The physical appearance of the man remembered by Eva Taylor sounds
                    > strikingly close to Tom Morris, as does the name. My guess would be that
                    > when played the side she, probably not being very interested nor having ears
                    > to distinguish one cornet from another, misremembered Tom. But I would like
                    > to think that whoever put the question -- where ? -- went on to exclude the
                    > obvious, Morris.
                  • David Brown
                    Many thanks Howard I never cease to be amazed at what you can find. His sad early demise placed him beyond reach of the early discographers /collectors and may
                    Message 9 of 27 , Oct 15, 2009
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                      Many thanks Howard

                      I never cease to be amazed at what you can find. His sad early demise placed
                      him beyond reach of the early discographers /collectors and may add a pinch
                      more circumstantial evidence to his case as the unattributed 'Big Charlie'.

                      Many thanks John

                      Reading the JRT notes to the 'Big Charlie', I infer some self-subversion,
                      particularly in the excerpt I quoted recently. But I do believe that JRT
                      felt the work to be by one man. He, as a practising brass player, offers
                      technical analysis of Charlie's style and I believe that what he is
                      subverting is the name he has 'invented'. Howard's information would put
                      Johnson's birth as almost definitely 1897. But the fact that he was
                      described as being older has always grated on me because his style, heavily
                      Louis influenced, suggests, rather, a young Turk. The linkage of the man
                      described by Eva with that hailed by Carter as 'Big Charlie' is anyway, to
                      me, very tenuous. It assumes that Eva had the ears and memory to recognise
                      one cornettist on one session among so many that she made.

                      My use of 'chops' was not qualitative. I am not saying that Charlie was
                      better than Tom, just different. I agree with you, I observed recently the
                      apparent variance in Tom's style but I would put this down to material as
                      well as context.

                      BUT. AS EVER. We run into the problem of provenance of the personnels we are
                      working from. Rust mostly I mean. I have learned to work initially only from
                      cast iron examples. Only this week I falsely designated work to Gus Aiken
                      through relying on Rust. I do not have the Elvira, nor have I found it
                      available online, but my Rust has unk. cornet. There is cast iron Gaines on
                      the 1929 Waller Buddies. This is later than 'Big Charlie' and shows him to
                      be an E.Coast stylist with about no Louis influence. I would therefore be
                      surprised to hear that Gaines was playing in Louis style three years earlier
                      on the Elvira and would thus doubt the attribution. I observe that the sides
                      are smack in the middle of Big Charlie's time span although I assume that
                      JRT must have heard and discounted.

                      I think to hear the case for a 'Big Charlie' one has to hear the complete
                      album, or the sides on the album, in sequence. Context is extremely
                      important for comparative listening. I hear the same man -- mostly --
                      although realistically there is so little cornet on some sides and/or so
                      badly recorded that it is impossible to tell. But we are still left with the
                      sides which sound like, and were claimed by, Jabbo. This must seriously
                      undermine the case for Big Charlie but the playing is similar enough for it
                      to be put down as mistake rather than piss-take.

                      Dave






                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Howard Rye
                      This provoked me into digitizing my very old file on Leon Abbey¹s British stays (that old) and I can add one more detail about Charlie Johnson. Abbey was a
                      Message 10 of 27 , Oct 15, 2009
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                        This provoked me into digitizing my very old file on Leon Abbey¹s British
                        stays (that old) and I can add one more detail about Charlie Johnson.

                        Abbey was a notorious poacher of other people¹s bands and the band he
                        poached for his British trip was Bill Brown¹s Brownies, so we can be sure
                        that it is the same Charles Johnson on their 17 March 1927 Vocalion, but the
                        file card (which is reproduced in VJM 119) gives no personnel information.

                        The Abbey band¹s main British gig was at the Olympia Dance Hall, which had
                        three bandstands. The others were occupied by Herman Darewski¹s band and
                        Gwen Rogers¹ Musical Dolls. I still have no idea who the Musical Dolls were,
                        not that I¹ve tried very hard to find out, but they didn¹t take part in any
                        of the broadcasts made by the other two bands.

                        on 15/10/2009 10:04, David Brown at johnhaleysims@... wrote:

                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Many thanks Howard
                        >
                        > I never cease to be amazed at what you can find. His sad early demise placed
                        > him beyond reach of the early discographers /collectors and may add a pinch
                        > more circumstantial evidence to his case as the unattributed 'Big Charlie'.
                        >


                        Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
                        howard@...
                        Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098




                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • David Brown
                        Thanks again Howard Rust has a full personnel for the Brownies March 1927 -- no probs, poss.s or ?s. Jazz Directory has total unks. So I wonder where it came
                        Message 11 of 27 , Oct 15, 2009
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                          Thanks again Howard

                          Rust has a full personnel for the Brownies March 1927 -- no probs, poss.s or
                          ?s. Jazz Directory has total unks. So I wonder where it came from ? By
                          backdating what Abbey arrived with ?

                          Not only Johnson but also, at least, Ralph James and Oliver Tines from the
                          Brownies, and I guess thus also Leon Abbey, stayed in Europe. Tines is with
                          Louis in both UK 1933 and Paris 1934 and James with Wooding in 1931. Life
                          must surely have been sweeter this side of the Atlantic, or in Paris at
                          least.

                          Fascinating collateral information there. Research proves the Gwen Roger's
                          Musical Dolls to have been a female quartet featuring the Japanese one
                          string phonofiddle who recorded in 1926. The link below will also introduce
                          the 'last great virtuoso of the bladder-and-string'. Burnt cork virtuoso.

                          <http://www.jonroseweb.com/f_projects_phonofiddle.html>

                          Dave








                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Howard Rye
                          Source is the New York Age of 28 January 1928 in a belated news item about Abbey taking the band (which astoundingly does tie up with the passenger list). ...
                          Message 12 of 27 , Oct 15, 2009
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                            Source is the New York Age of 28 January 1928 in a belated news item about
                            Abbey taking the band (which astoundingly does tie up with the passenger
                            list).


                            on 15/10/2009 16:07, David Brown at johnhaleysims@... wrote:

                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Thanks again Howard
                            >
                            > Rust has a full personnel for the Brownies March 1927 -- no probs, poss.s or
                            > ?s. Jazz Directory has total unks. So I wonder where it came from ? By
                            > backdating what Abbey arrived with ?
                            >
                            >


                            Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
                            howard@...
                            Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098




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                          • David Brown
                            Hello Yves I ll answer you on this thread. I m sure you never offend anybody and offer only stimulating topics for debate. It s in my head that Jabbo is
                            Message 13 of 27 , Oct 16, 2009
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                              Hello Yves

                              I'll answer you on this thread. I 'm sure you never offend anybody and offer
                              only stimulating topics for debate.

                              It's in my head that Jabbo is almost cast iron on the 'Ham Gravy' session
                              but I forget the source. Howard will know.

                              It certainly is more bravura playing and more technically without flaw,
                              although not flawless, than the other sides.

                              On Harry Cooper, I find not only the Fouad and Rostaing but three sessions
                              in Paris under his own name 1943 and 1947. Do you have these and/or know
                              where they were ever available ?

                              Dave




                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Howard Rye
                              The 1943 sessions are split across Jazz Time 799877-2: Americans In Paris Vol. 5 1939-1949; Jazz Time 789327-2: Americans In Paris Vol. 6 1942-1950, Jazz Time
                              Message 14 of 27 , Oct 16, 2009
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                                The 1943 sessions are split across Jazz Time 799877-2: Americans In Paris
                                Vol. 5 1939-1949; Jazz Time 789327-2: Americans In Paris Vol. 6 1942-1950,
                                Jazz Time 781336-2: Antillles Jazz 1930-1954. (These were probably marketed
                                by EMI for about three weeks but the series does turn up from French on-line
                                dealers.

                                The 1947 titles were on Barclay 81.004/5: Le Jazz Parisien...liberé. Anyone
                                know a CD?

                                While we¹re here, I have a main title index to pre-war Jazz Hots and a
                                detailed index to Jazz-Tango Swing. If Charlie Johnson was interviewed by
                                contemporary French enthusiasts, I don¹t where the results were published.
                                Any ideas, Yves? These guys mostly played in upper-class watering holes to
                                which the young cognoscenti couldn¹t go and this probably accounts for the
                                very scant attention they devoted to them. Johnson is mentioned once in
                                Panassié¹s Douze Années de Jazz.

                                on 16/10/2009 10:13, David Brown at johnhaleysims@... wrote:

                                >
                                > On Harry Cooper, I find not only the Fouad and Rostaing but three sessions
                                > in Paris under his own name 1943 and 1947. Do you have these and/or know
                                > where they were ever available ?
                                >
                                > Dave
                                >
                                >


                                Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
                                howard@...
                                Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098




                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Patrice Champarou
                                ... From: David Brown To: Sent: Friday, October 16, 2009 11:13 AM Subject: RE: [RedHotJazz] Re:
                                Message 15 of 27 , Oct 16, 2009
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                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: "David Brown" <johnhaleysims@...>
                                  To: <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
                                  Sent: Friday, October 16, 2009 11:13 AM
                                  Subject: RE: [RedHotJazz] Re: BUDDY CHRISTIAN CREOLE FIVE


                                  > On Harry Cooper, I find not only the Fouad and Rostaing but three sessions
                                  > in Paris under his own name 1943 and 1947. Do you have these and/or know
                                  > where they were ever available ?

                                  I've just read Howard's reply, but just in case some would match... 7
                                  tracks, apparently issued under Harry Cooper's name, are available on Swing
                                  Caraibe : Paris 1929-1946 by Frémeaux et associés, FA 069
                                  http://tinyurl.com/yh8xgux (Inspiration, Nuages, La Cigale, Allegro, Nos
                                  impressions, Caprice en Ut, Lune Rosse - tracks listing also on
                                  Amazon.co.uk).

                                  Patrice
                                • David Brown
                                  To answer myself on Ham Gravy and save Howard s energy. It never Rains but it --. Richard Rains, again, is the source in the notes of the Frog Tom Morris. He
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Oct 16, 2009
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                                    To answer myself on 'Ham Gravy' and save Howard's energy.

                                    It never Rains but it --. Richard Rains, again, is the source in the notes
                                    of the Frog Tom Morris. He claims to have confirmed this personally with
                                    Jabbo.

                                    It would certainly be nice if he joined us.

                                    Dave





                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Howard Rye
                                    Yes, indeed. These are the 1943 sides. Can¹t recommend this double CD too strongly. Simply didn¹t think of it in this context. ... [Non-text portions of this
                                    Message 17 of 27 , Oct 16, 2009
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                                      Yes, indeed. These are the 1943 sides. Can¹t recommend this double CD too
                                      strongly. Simply didn¹t think of it in this context.


                                      on 16/10/2009 11:38, Patrice Champarou at patrice.champarou@... wrote:

                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > ----- Original Message -----
                                      > From: "David Brown" <johnhaleysims@...
                                      > <mailto:johnhaleysims%40yahoo.co.uk> >
                                      > To: <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com <mailto:RedHotJazz%40yahoogroups.com> >
                                      > Sent: Friday, October 16, 2009 11:13 AM
                                      > Subject: RE: [RedHotJazz] Re: BUDDY CHRISTIAN CREOLE FIVE
                                      >
                                      >> > On Harry Cooper, I find not only the Fouad and Rostaing but three sessions
                                      >> > in Paris under his own name 1943 and 1947. Do you have these and/or know
                                      >> > where they were ever available ?
                                      >
                                      > I've just read Howard's reply, but just in case some would match... 7
                                      > tracks, apparently issued under Harry Cooper's name, are available on Swing
                                      > Caraibe : Paris 1929-1946 by Frémeaux et associés, FA 069
                                      > http://tinyurl.com/yh8xgux (Inspiration, Nuages, La Cigale, Allegro, Nos
                                      > impressions, Caprice en Ut, Lune Rosse - tracks listing also on
                                      > Amazon.co.uk).
                                      >
                                      > Patrice
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >>
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
                                      > howard@...
                                      > Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098
                                      >



                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • yves francois
                                          RE: HARRY COOPER The Mengo Blue Stars have not been reissued on CD - also a Mengo Swing that has not been reissued is on youtube right now. I also have
                                      Message 18 of 27 , Oct 16, 2009
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                                            RE: HARRY COOPER The Mengo Blue Stars have not been reissued on CD - also a Mengo Swing that has not been reissued is on youtube right now. I also have the 78 - if you are curious e mail me personally I will send MP3 of the two sides in rather better sound than the youtube site - it is some of the best Cooper on record - SWING #187 BLUES DU MATIN PA 1 & 2.    Let me know if anyone needs them for their collection - they happen to be amongst my favorite records in the 40's (and I also highly recommend the 2 CD set "SWING CARIBE" - all 8 Cooper Swing's are on them, plus 2 others with him and Big Boy Goudie from 1946 or so)
                                        Yves Francois Smierciak


                                        --- On Fri, 10/16/09, Howard Rye <howard@...> wrote:

                                        From: Howard Rye <howard@...>
                                        Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: BUDDY CHRISTIAN CREOLE FIVE
                                        To: "red hot jazz" <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
                                        Date: Friday, October 16, 2009, 6:43 AM













                                         





                                        Yes, indeed. These are the 1943 sides. Can¹t recommend this double CD too

                                        strongly. Simply didn¹t think of it in this context.



                                        on 16/10/2009 11:38, Patrice Champarou at patrice.champarou@ free.fr wrote:



                                        >

                                        >

                                        >

                                        >

                                        >

                                        > ----- Original Message -----

                                        > From: "David Brown" <johnhaleysims@ yahoo.co. uk

                                        > <mailto:johnhaleysi ms%40yahoo. co.uk> >

                                        > To: <RedHotJazz@yahoogro ups.com <mailto:RedHotJazz% 40yahoogroups. com> >

                                        > Sent: Friday, October 16, 2009 11:13 AM

                                        > Subject: RE: [RedHotJazz] Re: BUDDY CHRISTIAN CREOLE FIVE

                                        >

                                        >> > On Harry Cooper, I find not only the Fouad and Rostaing but three sessions

                                        >> > in Paris under his own name 1943 and 1947. Do you have these and/or know

                                        >> > where they were ever available ?

                                        >

                                        > I've just read Howard's reply, but just in case some would match... 7

                                        > tracks, apparently issued under Harry Cooper's name, are available on Swing

                                        > Caraibe : Paris 1929-1946 by Frémeaux et associés, FA 069

                                        > http://tinyurl. com/yh8xgux (Inspiration, Nuages, La Cigale, Allegro, Nos

                                        > impressions, Caprice en Ut, Lune Rosse - tracks listing also on

                                        > Amazon.co.uk) .

                                        >

                                        > Patrice

                                        >

                                        >

                                        >

                                        >

                                        >>

                                        >

                                        >

                                        > Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB

                                        > howard@coppermill. demon.co. uk

                                        > Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098

                                        >



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