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Re: Boyd Atkins

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  • ikey100
    As a naive younger fan, it was Odie Payne who particularly hipped me to Chicago s ongoing jazz/blues interchange, when he was playing in a trio with Erwin
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 26, 2009
      As a naive younger fan, it was Odie Payne who particularly hipped me to Chicago's ongoing jazz/blues interchange, when he was playing in a trio with Erwin Helfer and soprano saxist Clark Dean. Before then, Odie was known to me for his blues work, but I had always first thought of Fred Below for a jazzy blues drummer, until seeing Odie's jazz and entertainer skills in that trio. I suppose Elmore James' style was such a dominant force that sidemen like Boyd Atkins had less room for individual flourishes. And it's interesting to hear the stylistic tug of war when Bill Broonzy recorded with New York jazzmen like Don Byas, unlike the naturalness of, for example, Buster Bennett's work with Broonzy and Big Maceo.

      Warren
      --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "ROBERT R. CALDER" <serapion@...> wrote:
      >
      > Bob Koester has mentioned the jazzmen with bluesmen tradition in Chicago in a memoir of Delmark records.
      > An altoist very different from Saucier turns up on a J.B.Hutto date . . .
      > I also saw an Otis Rush sideman sitting in the Ellington band, and then there's Red Holloway!
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