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Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: Arnett Nelson

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  • Patrice Champarou
    This reminds me of some early blues LP s on which any unidentified pianist had to be Cripple Clarence Lofton, even when it was obvious that he, or even she,
    Message 1 of 38 , Aug 3, 2009
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      This reminds me of some early blues LP's on which any unidentified pianist
      had to be Cripple Clarence Lofton, even when it was obvious that he, or even
      she, was the singer ;-)

      P.

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Howard Rye" <howard@...>
      To: "red hot jazz" <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, August 03, 2009 10:27 AM
      Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: Arnett Nelson


      But fantasizing by discographers seems a much more likely explanation.

      I don¹t know who ³scottlededoo² is but I wish him joy of working on Arnett,
      whose discography has been so fatally confused by the activities of an
      over-enthusiastic and cloth-eared enthusiast, now deceased, who basically
      heard every unknown clarinettist on a pre-1940 record as his hero, that most
      serious discographers now routinely strike his name out ³pending
      investigation².

      I was unfortunately not present on a famous occasion when he presented his
      findings, but I was given many accounts of how he played records by at least
      ten different clarinettists and responded to gentle attempts to suggest that
      they all sounded different essentially by saying that this proved Arnett¹s
      genius that he was able to play in so many different styles.

      Good luck, mate, you¹ll need it.
    • David Weiner
      ... Don t forget, Gerry, that many bands had tuba and string bass side by side at the same time - this is readily apparent in many of the Vitaphone shorts of
      Message 38 of 38 , Jul 26, 2010
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        >
        > So now limiting the discussion to "big band/large ensemble" and avoiding
        > string-bands, quartets/quintets: I had always assume that this
        > setting--for recordings--generally had tuba. As such I was looking for who
        > began using string bass as a replacement for tuba, if it concentrated in
        > one or a few individual groups.
        >
        > .
        >
        > -- Gerry
        >
        >
        Don't forget, Gerry, that many bands had tuba and string bass side by side
        at the same time - this is readily apparent in many of the Vitaphone shorts
        of 1927-30 - often, a band also had a banjoist and a guitarist playing
        simultaneously, too. There are numerous records - like Gus Arnheim's "One
        More Time," from 1931, where tuba is in use on the first half of the disc,
        with a switchover to string bass for the "hot" final choruses to add an
        extra measure of excitement to the performance.

        Dave Weiner
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