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Re: hot fives and sevens...

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  • Michael Rader
    Yes it is, see: http://music.richmond.edu/faculty/Anderson_Gene.html which lists the work among his publications. Michael Rader
    Message 1 of 85 , Jul 8, 2009
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      Yes it is, see: http://music.richmond.edu/faculty/Anderson_Gene.html
      which lists the work among his publications.

      Michael Rader

      > Is this the same Gene Anderson as 'Johnny Dodds In New Orleans' ? The
      > 'Henry' suggests not.
    • David Weiner
      Dave Many thanks. I have been racking my brains to find any example of whites playing for blacks and you have one. Could the reason be that Lombardo played so
      Message 85 of 85 , Jul 22, 2009
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        Dave

        Many thanks. I have been racking my brains to find any example of whites
        playing for blacks and you have one. Could the reason be that Lombardo
        played so far outside the realms of black music that there was no
        competition ? Louis loved Lombardo too. I think that in the area of 'swing'
        the white bands would have been washed away by the Sultans et al at the
        Savoy. If they ever appeared. Do you know ?


        Bob Greenwood
        -------

        Well, offhand, I know that Glenn Miller got a huge turnout at the Savoy in
        1940; and Benny Goodman and Chick Webb had a sensational "Battle of the
        Bands" there in 1937, which Chick won, judging by crowd approval, but it was
        close!

        Charlie Barnet was the first white band to play the Apollo in 1934 (think
        that was the year). I am sure there are many other examples. If whites
        could enjoy black swing bands, there was no reason for blacks not to like
        white swing bands!

        Dave Weiner
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