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Blues My Naughty Sweetie Gives To Me

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  • Gilber M. Erskine
    I am doing an article on this remarkable tune written by Tin Pan Alley composers Arthur N. Swanstone, Charles R. McCarron, and Carey Morgan, published in 1919.
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 17, 2009
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      I am doing an article on this remarkable tune written by Tin Pan Alley composers Arthur N. Swanstone, Charles R. McCarron, and Carey Morgan, published in 1919.

      The song has had a remarkable fascination for New Orleans clarinetists over the years. First done by Alcide "Yellow" Nunez with the Louisiana Five in 1919, it was followed by Jimmie Noone in 1928. The dirge-like performance of the Noone group did not go over well, and the tune dropped out of sight among jazzmen and is missing in the jazz revivals of the 1930s and 40s.

      West Coast bands then picked up on the tune, and New Orleans clarinetists followed. Edmond Hall with Gene Krupa in 1950; Sidney Bechet in 1951; Ed Hall again with Eddie Condon in 1952; Omar Simeon with Wilbur DeParis in 1952; Tony Parenti with Precher Rollo in 1953.

      Then the 5-star bombshell of the 1954 Eddie Condon Columbia side with Edmond Hall; then the elusive Hangover Club 1054 Ralph Sutton session with Ed Hall that can't be purchased today under $60.00; Albert Nicholas with Art Hodes in 1955; Norman Meyer with Connie Jones in 1975; and finally, Raymond Burke with Plato Smith in 1975.

      Lord's Discography shows the tune has been recorded 273 times worldwide. Most of this stuff is dance band or mickey mouse. The song with truly 3rd-rate lyrics does real well with the mickey mouse crowd, but the chord sequences of the tune are superbly suited for the polyphonic front line of a New Orleans band.

      To give you an idea of the great beauty of the chordal flow of he tune, here are two outstanding performances on YouTube.

      The first is by Hans Carling at a concert in Poland in 1985; the second by a group in Finland, done as an after-thought at the end of a rehearsal. The vocalist sings all 3 of the song's choruses and obviously does not understand the god-awful lyrics.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KR6ktKKIVM

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-EV-n6nkjrM

      --------GILBERT M.ERSKINE


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • David Weiner
      Hey Gilbert, You should mention that since the song was not controlled by ASCAP, it could be played on American airwaves during the ASCAP radio strike of 1941.
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 17, 2009
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        Hey Gilbert,

        You should mention that since the song was not controlled by ASCAP, it could
        be played on American airwaves during the ASCAP radio strike of 1941. So
        big bands like Glenn Miller and singers like Bing Crosby gave the song a new
        lease on life which may have kept it in the public eye.

        Dave Weiner

        -----Original Message-----
        From: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com [mailto:RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of Gilber M. Erskine
        Sent: Thursday, June 18, 2009 12:10 AM
        To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [RedHotJazz] Blues My Naughty Sweetie Gives To Me

        I am doing an article on this remarkable tune written by Tin Pan Alley
        composers Arthur N. Swanstone, Charles R. McCarron, and Carey Morgan,
        published in 1919.

        The song has had a remarkable fascination for New Orleans clarinetists over
        the years. First done by Alcide "Yellow" Nunez with the Louisiana Five in
        1919, it was followed by Jimmie Noone in 1928. The dirge-like performance
        of the Noone group did not go over well, and the tune dropped out of sight
        among jazzmen and is missing in the jazz revivals of the 1930s and 40s.

        West Coast bands then picked up on the tune, and New Orleans clarinetists
        followed. Edmond Hall with Gene Krupa in 1950; Sidney Bechet in 1951; Ed
        Hall again with Eddie Condon in 1952; Omar Simeon with Wilbur DeParis in
        1952; Tony Parenti with Precher Rollo in 1953.

        Then the 5-star bombshell of the 1954 Eddie Condon Columbia side with Edmond
        Hall; then the elusive Hangover Club 1054 Ralph Sutton session with Ed Hall
        that can't be purchased today under $60.00; Albert Nicholas with Art Hodes
        in 1955; Norman Meyer with Connie Jones in 1975; and finally, Raymond Burke
        with Plato Smith in 1975.

        Lord's Discography shows the tune has been recorded 273 times worldwide.
        Most of this stuff is dance band or mickey mouse. The song with truly
        3rd-rate lyrics does real well with the mickey mouse crowd, but the chord
        sequences of the tune are superbly suited for the polyphonic front line of a
        New Orleans band.

        To give you an idea of the great beauty of the chordal flow of he tune, here
        are two outstanding performances on YouTube.

        The first is by Hans Carling at a concert in Poland in 1985; the second by a
        group in Finland, done as an after-thought at the end of a rehearsal. The
        vocalist sings all 3 of the song's choruses and obviously does not
        understand the god-awful lyrics.

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KR6ktKKIVM

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-EV-n6nkjrM

        --------GILBERT M.ERSKINE


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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