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Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: Vicksburg Blowers (was New Orleans Clarinet Style)

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  • Bob Eagle
    To move onto serious matters, Dixon was from Parkersburg, *West* Virginia, born about 1901, a son of Harrison and Clara Belle Dixon.  The 1920 census
    Message 1 of 54 , Feb 10, 2009
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      To move onto serious matters, Dixon was from Parkersburg, *West* Virginia, born about 1901, a son of Harrison and Clara Belle Dixon.  The 1920 census obligingly states that he was a musician.
       
      His wherabouts after about 1934 remain a mystery.
       
      Bob

      --- On Wed, 11/2/09, Bob Eagle <prof_hi_jinx@...> wrote:

      From: Bob Eagle <prof_hi_jinx@...>
      Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: Vicksburg Blowers (was New Orleans Clarinet Style)
      To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
      Received: Wednesday, 11 February, 2009, 4:26 AM






      Howard, I suggest that Vance S. Dixon will be the white Autombile Mechanic (of that spelling) who was at Jacksonville FL for the 1930 census.  Your proposed sponsors should look for investments in other S27s.
       
      Bob

      --- On Tue, 10/2/09, Howard Rye <howard@coppermill. demon.co. uk> wrote:

      From: Howard Rye <howard@coppermill. demon.co. uk>
      Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: Vicksburg Blowers (was New Orleans Clarinet Style)
      To: "red hot jazz" <RedHotJazz@yahoogro ups.com>
      Received: Tuesday, 10 February, 2009, 6:08 PM

      There¹s really no doubt at all that the clarinettist on the Vicksburg
      Blowers session is Vance Dixon, since this was really a Black Patti session
      and the (original) artist credit on Black Patti is Dixon¹s Chicago
      Serenaders.

      It is logical to suppose that the other two guys are the other members of
      Dixon¹s Jazz Maniacs on Paramount, i.e. Cline Tindull (that¹s how he signed
      his name) on piano and Lawrence Dixon on banjo, but definite evidence is
      lacking.

      Anyone interested in Dixon can be directed to Christopher Hillman & Roy
      Middleton, ŒDave Nelson and Others¹ (Tavistock, Cygnet, 2005) which includes
      a long section setting out everything known about him. Howard Rye & Bob
      Eagle, ŒCline Tindull¹, Names & Numbers 46 (July 2008), 16-19, performs the
      same service for the piano player.

      Most of Vance Dixon¹s recorded output can be heard on ŒHot Clarinets¹, RST
      JPCD-1519-2, which should be available from Document. It doesn¹t include the
      Vicksburg Blowers. According to Hillman, Dixon was born in Parkersburg,
      Virginia, around 1895 and is last heard of in New York City working with
      Ikey Robinson in 1933 and June Clark in 1934. No one seems to know what
      became of him or to have discovered anything more definite.

      In the 1930 census Dixon was lodging at 4936 Chestnut Avenue, Chicago, with
      his wife Elsie. He is said to be born in Pennysvania, but apparently didn¹t
      know his parents¹ birth states which inclines me to think that the landlord,
      himself a musician named James McIndree, filled in the schedule. Bassist
      Quinn Wilson and his family lived at the same address but are a separate
      household.

      A Vance S. Dixon, born 10 September 1894, last residence Ponte Vedra Beach,
      Saint Johns, FL, died on 15 August 1974 but in the absence of evidence that
      he had moved to Florida, where his Social Security number was issued before
      1951, I am not very inclined to hazard the $27 required to confirm whether
      this is our man. Any potential research sponsors out there!

      on 10/02/2009 00:52, velostigmat at bigbeark@rogers. com wrote:

      >
      >
      >
      > The clarinetist on the Vicksburg Blowers sessions of 1927, found on
      > "Rare Hot Chicago Jazz" audibly employs cycle breathing,holding one
      > note for maybe 20 seconds. This must surely be the earliest recorded
      > example of this technique
      >
      > The same musician plays alto sax on the other track. The tracks are
      > "Monte Carlo Joys" and "Twin Blues"
      >
      > While the reed player is creditted as "King Brady", Brady was thought
      > to be the recording contractor. The pianist sounds very much like
      > Kline Tyndall. It's likely the clarinetist was Vance Dixon, who was
      > noted by Mary Lou Williams as being a very proficient and showy
      > player.Does anyone have any thoughts about this?
      > --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogro ups.com <mailto:RedHotJazz% 40yahoogroups. com> ,
      > Mordechai Litzman <folke613@.. .> wrote:
      >> >
      >> > Just wanted to bring attention to an excellent 1929 recording of
      > Tony Parenti from 1929 - Old Man Rhytm. Another good clarinet player
      > that I am not sure has been mentioned is Vance Dixon, who can be heard
      > on Crazy Quilt from 1927. (He seems to have disappeared from the jazz
      > scene in the mid 30's).
      >> > Both of these recordings are available on the RHJA.
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> > ____________ _________ _________ __
      >> > From: Gilber M. Erskine <gerskine@.. .>
      >> > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogro ups.com <mailto:RedHotJazz% 40yahoogroups. com>
      >> > Sent: Monday, February 9, 2009 9:29:17 AM
      >> > Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] New Orleans Clarinet Style was Alcide
      > Nunez and others
      >> >
      >> >
      >> > I would have to add Pete Fountain to your list of revival clarinet
      > players. As commercial as he later became, in the late 40s, early
      > 50s, he was truly phenomenal.
      >> > When I was in New Orleans at that time, the historical emphasis was
      > on discography. Much to my regret, I kind of ignored descriptions of
      > early early jazz. Dr Edmond Souchon managed to get George Baquet to
      > give a talk at the New Orleans Jazz Club in 1948, and I could kick
      > myself for not paying more attention. What I do remember was the
      > remarkable diction and fluency Baquet had.
      >> > I also met bassist Albert Glenny, who had payed with Buddy Bolden,
      > and trombonist Tom Brown, and got nothing from them. Tom Brown
      > managed to escape much of the fame and fortune of the ODJB, but he
      > never seemed bothered by that.
      >> > There was no discussion of Uptown/Downtown styles at that time,
      > though what historians have written does make sense-- the uppity
      > downtown Creoles [Picou, Tio, Perez] vs the ragged uptown guys
      > [Keppard, Oliver].
      >> > Tony Parenti was another good early player who later played a role
      > in revival in New York.
      >> > The French Quarter in the late 40s still had all the Old World
      > charm, in spite of all the noise on Bourbon St.
      >> > I'm currently reading Sam Charters "A Trumpet Around the Corner".
      > While it has a lot of good stuff, good commentary on early jazz, his
      > updates on the revival of the 40s-50s curiously omits Orin Blackstone
      > and Dick Allen [I'm aware that there was a bitter falling out between
      > Allen and Charters].
      >> > Raymond Burke was truly one of the greats. His extraordinay ability
      > in ensemble playing is on full display on the "Original Dixieland One
      > Step" track in the 1964 album he made with Doc Evans, Doc Souchon,
      > Monk Hazel. His famous "explosion", kicking the whole band is there.
      > And when the elderly Emile Christian falters and drops out in the
      > final ensemble, Raymond immediately covers by dropping to the lower
      > register.
      >> > ---------GILBERT M. ERSKINE ----- Original Message -----
      >> > From: David Brown
      >> > To: RedHotJazz@yahoogro ups.com
      >> > Sent: Monday, February 09, 2009 4:56 AM
      >> > Subject: RE: [RedHotJazz] New Orleans Clarinet Style was Alcide
      > Nunez and others
      >> >
      >> > I have taken the liberty of dragging the various N.O. clarinet threads
      >> > together.
      >> >
      >> > Nunez & Tio may both have been of Hispanic descent but surely they
      > represent
      >> > the true poles of N.O. clarinet style, rough and smooth ?
      >> >
      >> > I find another candidate for Dodds influence. Celestin sessions 13 April
      >> > 1926 and 11 April 1927 and Rust seems to have various versions of
      > Celestin
      >> > personnels. Although Paul Barnes is also apparently there, it is as
      >> > saxophonist only, and the clarinet player is posited as Earl
      > Pierson, who
      >> > doubles tenor. But care because yet another reed player is present
      > on the
      >> > second session, Sidney Carriere.
      >> >
      >> > But the player on 'I'm Satisfied With Your Love' and 'Dear
      > Almanzoer' sound
      >> > the same man. This, to me, is playing recognisably in the same idiom as
      >> > Dodds although no carbon copy.
      >> >
      >> > I would be interested in any opinions and any information on Pierson.
      >> >
      >> > I have also been contemplating Fraser's interesting point on the
      >> > dissimilarities between Polo and Milé. As above, Polo was primarily and
      >> > initially a saxophonist. Can anyone find his first clarinet playing
      > ? Did he
      >> > only pick it up as the required instrument post revival ?
      >> >
      >> > Also on brothers, I've been exploring Harry Shields who has a very high
      >> > reputation and rates alongside Burke as the great white clarinettists of
      >> > revival in N.O. The only early sides are with Brownlee where he,
      >> > unfortunately, mainly plays bass sax. But there is wonderful and unique
      >> > playing on various Wiggs sessions from 1950. Can anyone suggest further
      >> > Harry ?
      >> >
      >> > Brownlee is reported (Sudhalter) when interviewed 1961 as claiming that
      >> > Harry was the first player he heard playing the low register style
      >> > associated with Roppolo. Harry was born 1899, Roppolo 1902. The
      > Brownlees
      >> > contain startling playing from 20 year old Bonano which also serves to
      >> > illustrate that the CJB sides with Louis were already well in
      > circulation in
      >> > N.O.
      >> >
      >> > Dave
      >> >
      >> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >> >
      >> > ------------ --------- --------- --------- --------- --------- -
      >> >
      >> > No virus found in this incoming message.
      >> > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
      >> > Version: 8.0.233 / Virus Database: 270.10.19/1939 - Release Date:
      > 02/07/09 13:39:00
      >> >
      >> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> >
      >> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >> >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >>
      >
      >
      > Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
      > howard@coppermill. demon.co. uk
      > Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098
      >

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    • David Brown
      Yes Howard, the others are reportedly white but even the 29 seemed to require a repertoire for floor shows and not blues. Interesting that you are a mite
      Message 54 of 54 , Feb 23, 2009
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        Yes Howard, the others are reportedly white but even the 29 seemed to
        require a repertoire for floor shows and not blues.

        Interesting that you are a mite sceptical on the One Cent. Yes, it does seem
        very poetically neat even down to the Goodman on the gyp organ.

        This is cited as Bill Russell unpublished notes 'Williams Research Center
        N.O.' Klatzko reserves that these notes were written well after the event
        for a proposed article or book.

        But I don't think Bill capable of even romantic disingenuousness.





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