Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [RedHotJazz] Re: Willie Joseph Johnny Dodds and the Klezmer Sound

Expand Messages
  • Dan Van Landingham
    Benny Goodman and Ziggy Elman brilliantly displayed their Ashkenazi roots.Shaw,on the other hand,struck me as being disconnected to his own Jewish roots.I say
    Message 1 of 48 , Feb 4, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Benny Goodman and Ziggy Elman brilliantly displayed their Ashkenazi roots.Shaw,on the
      other hand,struck me as being disconnected to his own Jewish roots.I say this after read-
      ding his 1952 autobiography "The Trouble with Cinderella".The only time I heard him use
      a klezmer "lick",if you will,was on his late 1940 Victor recording of "Doctor Livingstone I
      Presume".He used the same klezmer "lick" on a late 1939 radio broadcast that Delta M-
      usic's Laser Light jazz label when Shaw still had his 1937-39 big band.Elman's father was
      a cantor as I recall.Shaw's father was a ne'er do well tailor who left his family sometime in
      the early to middle twenties.Come to think of it,Goodman's father was also a tailor who lo-
      st his life when he was struck by a car in 1927 in Chicago.

      --- On Wed, 2/4/09, David Brown <johnhaleysims@...> wrote:

      From: David Brown <johnhaleysims@...>
      Subject: RE: [RedHotJazz] Re: Willie Joseph Johnny Dodds and the Klezmer Sound
      To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wednesday, February 4, 2009, 4:00 AM






      Hello Albert

      Yes, I hear what you mean but I think we have to put it down to coincidence
      for I assume there was no substantial Jewish community in N.O.

      Dodds on 'High Society' is essaying, rather approximately, the standard
      Picou solo transcribed from the piccolo part.

      Jazz and Kletzmer cross with Ted Lewis and it has also been suggested as yet
      another influence on Goodman and even Artie Shaw. But Lewis was influenced
      primarily by the raucous novelty style of Shields, to whom, yet again, we
      return.

      I have concluded that his influence was large and, due to his ODJB context
      and race, underrated.

      We are still left with where he got this shrill novelty style. I have on
      behind me now Nunez who was born in 1884 and, although care is needed
      because these sides postdate ODJB, it is probable that Nunez was playing in
      this style earlier and that, as his replacement with ODJB, Shields also
      assumed his style.

      I also speculate that Dodds unique style also drew on these elements. One
      can further ask whether Nunez represents a form of the posited 'black blues
      Uptown' clarinet.

      Dave

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


















      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • levi.marco@libero.it
      ... From : RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com To : RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com Cc : Date : Mon, 2 Mar 2009 11:12:21 +0000 (GMT) Subject : Re
      Message 48 of 48 , Mar 2, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        ---------- Initial Header -----------

        From : RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
        To : RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
        Cc :
        Date : Mon, 2 Mar 2009 11:12:21 +0000 (GMT)
        Subject : Re : [RedHotJazz] Re: Willie Joseph Johnny Dodds and the Klezmer Sound


        Hello Mr. Litwak. Could I get out of you the mp3 featuring "Veseliy Kazak" played by N. Brandwein? I'm just discovering the connection between Jazz and Klezmer, through the Woody Allen's clarinet. Thank you very much. Marco Levi
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.