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Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: Willie Joseph Johnny Dodds and the Klezmer Sound

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  • Howard Rye
    I have long been convinced that klezmer plays a much more important part in the ancestry of jazz than it has been given credit for. However, I don¹t think we
    Message 1 of 48 , Feb 4, 2009
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      I have long been convinced that klezmer plays a much more important part in
      the ancestry of jazz than it has been given credit for. However, I don¹t
      think we need concern ourselves with the distribution of Hebrew communities.
      If we did need to, we would need to know whether they were Ashkenazi or
      Sephardic also.

      However, I don¹t believe we do. The klezmer does not come from overhearing
      Ashkenazi weddings and bar mitzvahs. It comes via the vaudeville stage from
      some Jewish novelty act or from musicians who like Harry Raderman had
      actually played in klezmer bands in Eastern Europe before immigrating to
      America.

      This is of course only a hypothesis. No one has done the research but it
      might be fruitful if anyone is looking for a subject fior a dissertation.


      on 04/02/2009 10:00, David Brown at johnhaleysims@... wrote:

      >
      >
      >
      > Hello Albert
      >
      > Yes, I hear what you mean but I think we have to put it down to coincidence
      > for I assume there was no substantial Jewish community in N.O.
      >
      > Dodds on 'High Society' is essaying, rather approximately, the standard
      > Picou solo transcribed from the piccolo part.
      >
      > Jazz and Kletzmer cross with Ted Lewis and it has also been suggested as yet
      > another influence on Goodman and even Artie Shaw. But Lewis was influenced
      > primarily by the raucous novelty style of Shields, to whom, yet again, we
      > return.
      >
      > I have concluded that his influence was large and, due to his ODJB context
      > and race, underrated.
      >
      > We are still left with where he got this shrill novelty style. I have on
      > behind me now Nunez who was born in 1884 and, although care is needed
      > because these sides postdate ODJB, it is probable that Nunez was playing in
      > this style earlier and that, as his replacement with ODJB, Shields also
      > assumed his style.
      >
      > I also speculate that Dodds unique style also drew on these elements. One
      > can further ask whether Nunez represents a form of the posited 'black blues
      > Uptown' clarinet.
      >
      > Dave
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >


      Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
      howard@...
      Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • levi.marco@libero.it
      ... From : RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com To : RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com Cc : Date : Mon, 2 Mar 2009 11:12:21 +0000 (GMT) Subject : Re
      Message 48 of 48 , Mar 2, 2009
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        From : RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
        To : RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
        Cc :
        Date : Mon, 2 Mar 2009 11:12:21 +0000 (GMT)
        Subject : Re : [RedHotJazz] Re: Willie Joseph Johnny Dodds and the Klezmer Sound


        Hello Mr. Litwak. Could I get out of you the mp3 featuring "Veseliy Kazak" played by N. Brandwein? I'm just discovering the connection between Jazz and Klezmer, through the Woody Allen's clarinet. Thank you very much. Marco Levi
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