Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [RedHotJazz] Fletcher Henderson's legacy

Expand Messages
  • bruce talbot
    Maybe the original Highlanders didn t want to pay for stock arrangements which did have intros and codas and sax figures behind the brass chorus and brass
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 17, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Maybe the original Highlanders didn't want to pay for stock arrangements which did have intros and codas and sax figures behind the brass chorus and brass figures behind the sax chorus - and a 'hotter' ensemble last chorus.  These were widely available in the 1920s and used all over the world.


      --- On Sat, 1/17/09, robin12smith <robin12@...> wrote:
      From: robin12smith <robin12@...>
      Subject: [RedHotJazz] Fletcher Henderson's legacy
      To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Saturday, January 17, 2009, 4:25 PM











      We all know about how Fletcher Henderson changed jazz arranging with

      his call and response, his changing instrumentation, etc. But it's

      easier to appreciate it when you get a chance to hear what it sounded

      like beforehand.



      I had the opportunity to play with an group call the Highlanders. It

      was named after a local community, not Scotland. Three saxes, two

      trumpets, trombone, piano, and drums. A small big-band predacessor,

      the history of the group was that it was formed in 1930, and kept

      going one way or another. It currently plays one-hour shows at

      retirement homes.



      Anyway, the charts were hand-written from 1930's. And all of them

      were the same formula. First, the trumpets and trombone would play

      the tune in simple three-part harmony, no intro. Then the saxes

      would play the tune in simple three-part harmony. The the first half

      of the tune (3rd time around) would either be a trombone solo, a

      piano solo, or someone would sing. Then for the last half of the

      tune, everyone would play their same part as before. Then the song

      would end, no coda.



      While perhaps the national bands had something more sophisticated, I

      can see how in the 1930's this would be considered adequate

      for "modern" dance music, simply because that's what folks wanted -

      just some nice fox-trots to dance to. They accepted those

      arrangements because it was good enough.



      So let us give a thanks to those early Jazz arrangers for raising the

      bar, and making audiences more aware of good big-band music by

      knowing what it isn't.


























      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.