Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: Frankie Newton

Expand Messages
  • Dan Van Landingham
    Now that I think about it,Swing Street WAS the name of that boxed set on the old EPlabel issued by Columbia.I also have found out that many of those tracks
    Message 1 of 11 , Dec 6, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Now that I think about it,Swing Street WAS the name of that boxed set on the old EPlabel issued by Columbia.I also have found out that many of those tracks were issued on CBS'
      Collector's Series somtime in the ' 80s.One of my favourite 1941 Harry James sides called
      The Mole.I have a couple of Columbia 78s of the tune which use the same master I heard
      via Billy May's studio band in the early '70s(from that Big Band tribute May did for Capitol
      after Glen Gray died and the project ended up in the hands of Billy May.I knew a number
      of the men who took part on those sessions:Skeets Herfurt on alto sax;John Best was one
      of the trumpeters and Al Hendrickson who did a  couple of sessions on guitar.I coresponded with Skeets from 1982 until his death in 1992.Al Hendrickson was a very dear
      friend  of mine.I lost him in July of 2007 and his wife Patti the year before.Both were buried
      in a Coos Bay,Oregon cemetary.John Best and former Shaw alto saxist Les Robinson
      who played lead alto for Shaw from 1937 until early 1942.John was in Shaw's Navy band
      along with drummer Davey Tough who was Shaw's drummer in late 1941 and early '42.
      The only source of band information was found in Billie Holiday's 1956 bio called Lady
      Sings the Blues which she co-wrote with attorney William Dufty.It was outrageously
      inaccurate when compared to the book Billie's Blues by John Chilton from 1973.

       


       
      From: Bob Mates <bluesbob@...>
      Subject: Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: Frankie Newton
      To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Friday, December 5, 2008, 10:09 PM






      Hi. I remember an Epic boxed set, called Swing Street. It
      originally came out in the mid-'60's. I could be wrong, but I
      think it had Will Bradley's "Beat Me Daddy, 8 to the Bar." I know
      it "Flat Fleet Floogee" by Slim and Slam. It had early
      recordings by big Joe Turner, Dizzy Gillespie, The Spirits of
      Rhythm, and others. I also remember that the Reader's Digest
      Album of the Month had a boxed set, called 52ND STREET, which
      featured mostly old Commodore stuff, by Coleman Hwkins, Chu
      Berry, Lester Young, and a lot of stuff, from that famous town
      Hall Concert, from 1945. Great set! Incidentally, a lot of that
      stuff, (the Commodore recordings), came out on a label, called
      Jazzland, which was popular in the 1950's. They were in real
      thin jackets. I had a bunch of 'em; Jelly Roll Morton; Fats
      Waller; Chu Berry; Jimmy Yancey, Etc. Actually, the label issued
      old Commodore and Victor stuff. They were a lot of fun to
      collect. Well, I've really rambled, and not like the guy the
      song is about! hahaha Bob

















      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • David Brown
      I would like to offer sincere thanks to Yves for his exhaustive and profound overview of the work of the wonderful Frankie Newton. I look forward to future
      Message 2 of 11 , Dec 11, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        I would like to offer sincere thanks to Yves for his exhaustive and profound
        overview of the work of the wonderful Frankie Newton. I look forward to
        future instalments if possible but appreciate the amount of work involved.

        There are at least a couple of Newton sites online which offer biographies
        and personal reminiscences.

        Critically, I like Charles Fox in 'Essential Jazz Records -1'

        ' Most jazz musicians can contrive to sound either exuberant or melancholy
        but rarely within the same solo. Newton, though, was a trumpeter capable of
        making sudden shifts, able to justify switching from one emotional stance to
        another.'

        Late lamented Sudhalter in 'Lost Chords' has Frank 'achieving volume and
        high register by pressing the mouthpiece into his upper lip. His sound and
        execution in the final ensembles of quite a few of his records display the
        forced over-percussive attack characteristic of this practice.'

        There is indeed sometimes a strained quality in his work and these technical
        problems may account for the premature end to his career and his switch to
        Flugelhorn and what appears to be bass trumpet. ( There is a photo to be
        found online.)

        This also raises the issues of how both 'incorrect' often self-taught
        technique, especially in brass players, and high note trumpet syndrome have
        moulded the music --- for better or worse.

        Dave




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.