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Re: Johnny Dodds and Creole style

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  • David N. Lewis
    There are several answers to this question, and I am too tired to read the whole thread to see if this this name was broached anon, but I would suggest Louis
    Message 1 of 12 , Sep 1, 2008
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      There are several answers to this question, and I am too tired to
      read the whole thread to see if this this name was broached anon, but
      I would suggest Louis "Big Eye" Nelson (nee deLisle). He recorded
      only in the 1940s with Kid Rena and Wooden Joe Nicholas; the sessions
      with Nicholas were collected on an AM CD under Big Eye's name. 55
      years of age when he made his first record (the very year Dodds died,
      incidentally), Big Eye does not have the dexterity of Dodds, but the
      fluid tone and building long-breathed phrases in high registers, he's
      got. I really like his playing with Rena -- there is a fair amount of
      division of opinion about those sessions, but I find them of great
      value; "Gettysburg Blues" actually hearkens back to the pre-
      syncopated, pre-Jazz state of Jazz.

      Uncle Dave Lewis
      Ann Arbor, MI

      --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Bob Eagle <prof_hi_jinx@...> wrote:
      >
      > I really enjoy Dodds' work, but I confess I have not given much
      thought to the relationship between his style and that of other
      clarinetists.
      >
      > However, if his family came from Marengo County, Alabama shortly
      before he was born, clearly he was not himself a creole. This must
      also be the case if he hailed from a place called Waverly (whether in
      LA or MS) or from, say, Waveland, MS.
      >
      > To end up with a creole style, he must have learned the style from
      creoles living in his neighborhood.
      >
      > In 1900 the family was family in Ward 10 (2123 Philp St).
      >
      > Apart from William, who had already married and was living at 3026
      Franklin (Ward 11), the family seems to have avoided notice in 1910.
      >
      > By 1917, Johnny was at 2523 Philip (is this just coincidentally
      similar to the 1900 address?), in Ward 10.
      >
      > Also in 1917, Willie and Baby Dodds were both at 2034 Third Street
      (apparently just inside Ward 11, as First is the boundary between
      Wards 10 and 11). Wards 10 and 11 had comprised Lafayette City
      before it was absorbed into New Orleans in 1852.
      >
      > In 1920, William was in Ward 11, as was Baby Dodds, but at
      different addresses. However, Johnny had moved to 1518 S. Robertson
      (Ward 1). Ward 1 is immediately east of Ward 10, while Ward 11 is
      immediately to its west.
      >
      > Whoever influenced Johnny, it was probably players from Wards 1, 10
      and/or 11, which are all adjacent to one another, because he was
      apparently in that general area until at least 1920, and he moved to
      Chicago soon afterwards.
      >
      > Are there recorded examples of creole players who likely influenced
      Dodds?
      >
      > Thanks
      > Bob
      >
      >
      >
      > Start at the new Yahoo!7 for a better online experience.
      www.yahoo7.com.au
      >
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