Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: A late posting on Re-Creation: Traditionalists and Revivalists in Jazz

Expand Messages
  • Dan Van Landingham
    Here on the Oregon coast,we have had a trad jazz fest here for a number of years and from my viewpoint,what is being passed off for trad jazz isn t.I ve heard
    Message 1 of 12 , Jun 23, 2008
      Here on the Oregon coast,we have had a trad jazz fest here for a number of years and from
      my viewpoint,what is being passed off for trad jazz isn't.I've heard some of the stuff and it
      it leaves me rather cold.I guess the question,in my mind,is "just what is the real deal and
      what isn't?" One recording I heard back in late 1970 was a Columbia reissue of Bunk Joh-
      nson's "The Entertainer" the one-in-the-same Scott Joplin rag that Marvin Hamlisch revived
      for that movie of "The Sting" in 1973 that everybody ran into the ground.Johnson's recording
      dated from 1947.I didn't like Johnson's recording at all for what it's worth.
           Speaking of recreating,I knew a couple of the musicians who were heavily involved in
      that monumental project the late Glen Gray started in 1956 when he went back and recr-
      eated high fidelity,stereophonic versions of many of the big band hit records with a few o-
      thers that were more musician's favourites.Some were great some missed the mark.Billy
      May finished up the series after Gray died in 1963.Many of those same musicians did
      similar big band recreations for the economy labels such as Crown as "Members of the
      _________Orchestra".I had several of those albums as well as a few recreations done by
      The Bay Big Band led by Belgian leader Francis Bay.Again,some were  good and some
      were not.I think I'll stick with the original recordings.I had a late '50s to early '60s RCA LP
      of Morton's Red Hot Peppers and it was a great album.I can't tell you about the recordings
      Morton later on for RCA when he went to New York City the same time King Oliver did.

      --- On Sun, 6/22/08, Robert Greenwood <robertgreenwood_54uk@...> wrote:

      From: Robert Greenwood <robertgreenwood_54uk@...>
      Subject: [RedHotJazz] Re: A late posting on Re-Creation: Traditionalists and Revivalists in Jazz
      To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Sunday, June 22, 2008, 3:04 PM






      --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogro ups.com, Mordechai Litzman <folke613@.. .> wrote:
      >
      > I agree completely with Robert, and I actually had in mind the 9 min Midnight Blues when I
      wrote this post. I am sure that there are eyewitness accounts of the playing of the great
      bands of the 20's, and probably mentions of how long they would play a tune. It would be
      interesting to hear from the historians and others in the group of such accounts.

      This also raises the question of quite how authentic are those revivalist bands who attempt
      to recreate the classic bands of the 1920s such as King Oliver's Creole JB simply by copying
      their recordings. I feel sure that records made of working bands offer only a precis of their
      true sound. The case I think is different with bands such as the Louis Hot 5 & 7 who existed
      only in the studio. Similarly I think that the Morton Red Hot Peppers sides are not only
      compositions for jazz band but compositions specifically for a recorded jazz band taking
      account of the necessary three-minute time limit.
      Robert Greenwood


















      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.