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Ma Rainey with Louis Armstrong

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  • spacelights
    In an interview recorded in 1960, Armstrong recalls (of his own accord) making If you don t believe I m sinking, look what a hole I m in with Ma Rainey.
    Message 1 of 4 , May 28 11:40 PM
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      In an interview recorded in 1960, Armstrong recalls (of his own
      accord) making "If you don't believe I'm sinking, look what a hole I'm
      in" with Ma Rainey.

      Although he may have misremembered (perhaps thinking of "See See
      Rider"), is matrix number 1928 accounted for? I wonder if this
      represents another variation on traditional verses... The line
      appears in Clarence Williams' 1921 "If You Don't Believe I Love You,
      Look What A Fool I've Been."
    • Howard Rye
      Matrix no. 1928 is a blank in the most recent version of Max Vreede¹s Paramount listing that I have. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 4 , May 29 1:08 AM
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        Matrix no. 1928 is a blank in the most recent version of Max Vreede¹s
        Paramount listing that I have.


        on 29/05/2008 07:40, spacelights at spacelights@... wrote:

        >
        >
        >
        > In an interview recorded in 1960, Armstrong recalls (of his own
        > accord) making "If you don't believe I'm sinking, look what a hole I'm
        > in" with Ma Rainey.
        >
        > Although he may have misremembered (perhaps thinking of "See See
        > Rider"), is matrix number 1928 accounted for? I wonder if this
        > represents another variation on traditional verses... The line
        > appears in Clarence Williams' 1921 "If You Don't Believe I Love You,
        > Look What A Fool I've Been."
        >
        >
        >
        >>>
        >>>
        >>> Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
        >>> howard@...
        >>> Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098
        >>>



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • John O
        Thanks Howard: the If you don t believe I m sinking, look what a hole I m in lyric also turns up in the Memphis Jug Band s Stealin Stealin (1928).
        Message 3 of 4 , May 29 1:30 PM
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          Thanks Howard: the "If you don't believe I'm sinking, look what a hole
          I'm in" lyric also turns up in the Memphis Jug Band's "Stealin'
          Stealin'" (1928).

          --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Howard Rye <howard@...> wrote:
          >
          > Matrix no. 1928 is a blank in the most recent version of Max Vreede¹s
          > Paramount listing that I have.
          >
          >
          > on 29/05/2008 07:40, spacelights at spacelights@... wrote:
          >
          > >
          > > In an interview recorded in 1960, Armstrong recalls (of his own
          > > accord) making "If you don't believe I'm sinking, look what a hole I'm
          > > in" with Ma Rainey.
          > >
          > > Although he may have misremembered (perhaps thinking of "See See
          > > Rider"), is matrix number 1928 accounted for? I wonder if this
          > > represents another variation on traditional verses... The line
          > > appears in Clarence Williams' 1921 "If You Don't Believe I Love You,
          > > Look What A Fool I've Been."
        • John O
          Also, in Sandra Lieb s Mother of the Blues : ...drummer Zutty Singleton recalled: around 1914, while appearing at a tent show at Louisiana Avenue and Howard
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 1, 2008
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            Also, in Sandra Lieb's 'Mother of the Blues':

            "...drummer Zutty Singleton recalled: around 1914, while appearing at
            a tent show at Louisiana Avenue and Howard in New Orleans, she
            [Rainey] sang a well-known blues which included the line, 'If you
            don't b'lieve I'm sinkin', look what a hole I'm in.'

            "Clarinetist Willie Humphries... also recalls her singing this tune."

            >
            > In an interview recorded in 1960, Armstrong recalls (of his own
            > accord) making "If you don't believe I'm sinking, look what a hole I'm
            > in" with Ma Rainey.
            >
            > Although he may have misremembered (perhaps thinking of "See See
            > Rider"), is matrix number 1928 accounted for? I wonder if this
            > represents another variation on traditional verses... The line
            > appears in Clarence Williams' 1921 "If You Don't Believe I Love You,
            > Look What A Fool I've Been."
            >
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