Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: One more time re London and Jelly

Expand Messages
  • Tommer
    In Jelly Roll Morton lexicon section means mostly a restricted unique small place. Search for the word section in the following:
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 29, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      In Jelly Roll Morton lexicon section means mostly a restricted unique
      small place.

      Search for the word "section" in the following:
      http://www.doctorjazz.co.uk/locspeech1.html
      http://www.doctorjazz.co.uk/locspeech2.html
      Tommer


      -- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "spacelights" <spacelights@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > How sure are we that he didn't visit London Ontario, 1913-16? Not
      > very, I think... Jelly seems flexible with dates as a matter of
      show
      > business routine, or he may have forgotten the exact year. We can
      > place Jelly often in Chicago, not so far from London Ontario, during
      > these years.
      >
      > Much more speculative, but as Howard observed, one can't be certain
      > that Jelly didn't visit London England in 1913-14 (or perhaps even
      > 1911-12...).
      >
      > --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Hugh <hughphoric@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Please let me return to this just one more time!
      > > Alistair Cooke plainly stated that when he answered Jelly's query
      > about his origin, Jelly's reponse to the answer 'London' (by which
      > Cooke meant London England) was that he had been 'in that section'
      in
      > '19 and 13'.
      > > I cannot believe that Morton would have thought that Cooke was
      > referring to a small Californian town, but London Ontario is a
      > sizeable community near the Great Lakes and so could be a candidate
      if
      > he did not mean London England.
      > > If, however, London Ont is impossible and we discount the idea
      that
      > Morton was thinking of a small town in California (or elsewhere in
      the
      > USA), either Cooke is not accurately reporting what Morton said or
      > Morton is offering an inaccurate memory. As a reporter Cooke was not
      > averse to hyperbole and factual embellishment, and neither was
      Morton.
      > I suppose we will never know what was happening in the minds of
      either
      > party to the discussion. Pity.
      > > Any final comments?
      > > Hugh
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.