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Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: The Importance of Being Kid Ernest

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  • Prof_Hi_Jinx
    There is an Ernest Michel, born Thibodeaux in 1900, and an Ernest Michell (sic) born in Natchitoches County about 1905, either of whom sounds more likely than
    Message 1 of 32 , Apr 9, 2008
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      There is an Ernest Michel, born Thibodeaux in 1900, and an Ernest Michell (sic) born in Natchitoches County about 1905, either of whom sounds more likely than any of the Michall or Mitchell listings.

      Bob

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Michael Rader
      To: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, April 10, 2008 5:02 AM
      Subject: [RedHotJazz] Re: The Importance of Being Kid Ernest


      Coming back to Howard's mail quoted below, the "hard back" issues of
      "Storyville" issued after cessation of publication as a bi-monthly
      contained a section called "Pieces of the Jigsaw". In the 1996-7
      edition (p.215), there is an item on Ernest "Mike" Michall based on
      the Baltimore Afro American of 25 January 1930, which reported
      Michall's death. The article says that he was from New Orleans and
      gives his name as Ernest *Michel*. Of course, this doesn't prove
      anything except that contemporaries indeed thought he was from New
      Orleans.

      Michall is listed as the clarinetist with the New Orleans Nehi Boys on
      at least two LPs (Herwin 205 and Policy Wheel PW 4593) I have, but
      Ernest Virgo in a letter to Laurie Wright quoted in an Odds and Ends
      section of the 2002-3 "Storyville", points out that the recording date
      had been coveniently shifted to Michall's lifetime.

      Michael Rader

      --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Howard Rye <howard@...> wrote:
      >
      > Let's be clear first that Ernest Michall is a real person who was a
      member
      > of the Whitman Sisters band for many years. Karl Gert zur Heide's later
      > article 'Clyde, Mike & The Whitman Sisters', Footnote Vol. 8, No. 3
      (1977),
      > presents all the available details. He died on 23 January 1930. He has
      > obituaries in the Chicago Defender and the Pittsburgh Courier, which
      says he
      > was about 30. He had been hospitalized in a sanatorium for a year or
      so (so
      > TB or the other thing). I don't know whether anyone has ever tried
      to firm
      > this up. I only know that I haven't. Contemporaries thought he was
      from New
      > Orleans and he had been with the Whitmans for 14 years. He is on the
      July
      > 1927 Black Patti sessions by various members of the Whitman Sisters
      band.
      > These are among the very rarest of vintage jazz 78s.
      >
      > Kid Ernest Michael is a discographical invention and nothing more. The
      > clarinettist on the Ishman Bracey/Tommy Johnson/Charley Taylor Paramount
      > sessions was recalled simply as "Kid Ernest". The drive to provide
      him with
      > a surname started early. We can be sure this is not Ernest Michall
      of the
      > Whitman Sisters band, most especially because he was dead.
      >
      > Kid Ernest Moliere was a member of Nat Towles's band in the earlier
      20s.
      > The evidence for naming him as Kid Ernest on the Paramounts eludes
      me, but
      > it must have been convincing because we adopted it for Blues & Gospel
      > Records. If Ken Colyer met him, maybe he asked him. If so, this would be
      > probably be reported in an issue of Eureka. Honestly, he seems an
      unlikely
      > candidate, since he was a member of a distinguished N.O. musical family,
      > fronted a band in New Orleans in the 1930s, and one would expect him
      to have
      > been a more schooled musician. Unless he is on any of the private
      recordings
      > made in the 40s which have appeared on American Music in recent years he
      > doesn't seem to have (otherwise) recorded.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > on 8/4/08 10:05, Robert Greenwood at robertgreenwood_54uk@... wrote:
      >
      > May I throw into the mix the case of Kid Ernest Michal, or should
      > that be Kid Ernest Moliere? Both seem to have been New Orleans-born
      > clarinettists, the former having died around 1930, and the latter
      > supposedly sighted at a Mardi Gras parade in 1952 by none other than
      > Ken Colyer. Karl Gert zur Heide wrote an article on Michal/Moliere in
      > Blues Unlimited Winter 1983/84. I read this article for the first
      > time in a decade on the train to work this morning, and will have to
      > read it again tonight on the return journey because I am still
      > somewhat confused. The clarinettist on the New Orleans Nehi Boys
      > sessions of Spring 1930 formerly thought to be Kid Ernest Michal,
      > was, by the time of zur Heide's article, thought to be Moliere. The
      > Arnett Nelson connection is that both Harold Dejan and Ishmon Bracey
      > remember Kid Ernest taking apart the clarinet piece by piece down to
      > the mouthpiece while still playing it. Bracey (who, I think, recalled
      > him as Kid Michal, as opposed to Dejan who, presumably, recalled him
      > as Kid Ernest Moliere) said he would "pop that reed like it was a
      > kettledrum."
      > It's probably not worth the time and effort trying to determine
      > whether Michal/Moliere copied this "technique" from Nelson, or Nelson
      > copied it from Moliere/Michal, but has any more biographical
      > information concerning either clarinettist emerged since zur Heide's
      > article?
      > Robert Greenwood.
      >
      >
      > Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
      > howard@...
      > Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >





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    • David Brown
      Thanks John for pointing to Mobile/Farish . I have only been able to sample but the playing here is certainly more fluent although full of slaps, pops,
      Message 32 of 32 , Apr 10, 2008
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        Thanks John for pointing to 'Mobile/Farish'.

        I have only been able to sample but the playing here is certainly more
        fluent although full of slaps, pops, squeaks, growls and rasps. Indeed not a
        million miles away from Dodds although he was a serious and sober musician.

        Dave




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