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RE: [RedHotJazz] Arnett Nelson

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  • David Brown
    Many thanks Robert. Ellisville MS and Ellisville MI are confusing for us Brits. Many thanks Howard for digging out the Collins. Not sure how much moving Arnett
    Message 1 of 38 , Apr 7, 2008
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      Many thanks Robert. Ellisville MS and Ellisville MI are confusing for us
      Brits.

      Many thanks Howard for digging out the Collins.

      Not sure how much moving Arnett nearer N.O. requires us to amend the origins
      of his style. I think 134 miles was a long way in the deep south at the turn
      of the 20th century. We would need to know when and how long he was
      resident in N.O. If this can be dated to pre-1906, as an exact contemporary
      of Dodds, it makes possible a common style.

      Was the Collins' Snr a reading band ? Lee never did read but the presence
      of Tio suggests that it was. Was Arnett a reader ? The Wade photo shows no
      music stands.

      Lord has 32 Arnett sessions 1923-37. Only about half seem to be in Rust, the
      rest presumably qualifying for G&D (&R) which I do not have. Rust's entries
      carry many a question mark and do not include him on the Mutts. My guess is
      that most of the blues sessions are aural attributions and less than totally
      reliable.

      Dave





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    • David Weiner
      ... Don t forget, Gerry, that many bands had tuba and string bass side by side at the same time - this is readily apparent in many of the Vitaphone shorts of
      Message 38 of 38 , Jul 26, 2010
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        >
        > So now limiting the discussion to "big band/large ensemble" and avoiding
        > string-bands, quartets/quintets: I had always assume that this
        > setting--for recordings--generally had tuba. As such I was looking for who
        > began using string bass as a replacement for tuba, if it concentrated in
        > one or a few individual groups.
        >
        > .
        >
        > -- Gerry
        >
        >
        Don't forget, Gerry, that many bands had tuba and string bass side by side
        at the same time - this is readily apparent in many of the Vitaphone shorts
        of 1927-30 - often, a band also had a banjoist and a guitarist playing
        simultaneously, too. There are numerous records - like Gus Arnheim's "One
        More Time," from 1931, where tuba is in use on the first half of the disc,
        with a switchover to string bass for the "hot" final choruses to add an
        extra measure of excitement to the performance.

        Dave Weiner
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