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RE: [RedHotJazz] Arnett Nelson

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  • David Brown
    Many many thanks to Bob and Howard. I discover that Ellisville is only 13 miles from St Louis and a long, long way from N.O. If Arnett was resident in this
    Message 1 of 38 , Apr 4, 2008
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      Many many thanks to Bob and Howard.

      I discover that Ellisville is only 13 miles from St Louis and a long, long
      way from N.O. If Arnett was resident in this area till at least age 25
      difficult to understand how Lee Collins mistook him for N.O. Can anybody who
      has the Collins add ? Also difficult to understand how he is supposed to
      have absorbed 'Creole' clarinet style. Much more likely that St Louis was
      prime influence.

      I've just listened the Wades and both 'Mobile Blues' 1923 and 'Gates Blues'
      1928 offer low-register, rather rudimentary clarinet solos. Nothing here
      with Rev. Thacker's 'portamentos' redolent of N.O. Creole clarinet style.
      The Wade photo on RHJ shows a supposed Arnett holding a tenor with a soprano
      in front of him and there may also be a clarinet. The Mutts 1929 also offer
      clarinet soloist with similar style although more obviously Dodds
      influenced. I suggest that any N.O. in Nelson was derived from Dodds, whose
      style was dominant on the South Side in the 20s.

      Also the various styles, as even noted by Virgo, are always suspicious of
      various players.

      What other clarinettists were active in Chicago blues area in the 30s ?

      Dave




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    • David Weiner
      ... Don t forget, Gerry, that many bands had tuba and string bass side by side at the same time - this is readily apparent in many of the Vitaphone shorts of
      Message 38 of 38 , Jul 26 7:54 PM
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        >
        > So now limiting the discussion to "big band/large ensemble" and avoiding
        > string-bands, quartets/quintets: I had always assume that this
        > setting--for recordings--generally had tuba. As such I was looking for who
        > began using string bass as a replacement for tuba, if it concentrated in
        > one or a few individual groups.
        >
        > .
        >
        > -- Gerry
        >
        >
        Don't forget, Gerry, that many bands had tuba and string bass side by side
        at the same time - this is readily apparent in many of the Vitaphone shorts
        of 1927-30 - often, a band also had a banjoist and a guitarist playing
        simultaneously, too. There are numerous records - like Gus Arnheim's "One
        More Time," from 1931, where tuba is in use on the first half of the disc,
        with a switchover to string bass for the "hot" final choruses to add an
        extra measure of excitement to the performance.

        Dave Weiner
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