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Re: [RedHotJazz] Arnett Nelson

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  • Bob Eagle
    It s hard to be certain, but there is an Arnet Nelson near Mumford in Robertson County, TX in 1920 (aged 13, born to parents from Alabama), son of Adam and
    Message 1 of 38 , Apr 3, 2008
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      It's hard to be certain, but there is an Arnet Nelson near Mumford in Robertson County, TX in 1920 (aged 13, born to parents from Alabama), son of Adam and Annie.

      Apart from him, most listings undser that name are female.

      Bob

      David Brown <johnhaleysims@...> wrote:
      Just listening my sole Arnett, a 1978 Magpie LP. This is a collection of
      blues accompaniments. Only ever two sides under his name. Also on the Jimmy
      Wades. A very interesting player. Reportedly from N.O. which he left for
      Chicago in 1916 at a tender age but how tender I cannot find. There is very
      little classic N.O. creole in his style which oververges sometimes on hokum.
      The identification of him is aural and style is very reminiscent at times of
      Odell Rand, who was working in a very similar milieu. Some similarities with
      Dodds but if influence it may have been absorbed in Chicago rather than N.O.

      The only information on him is -- or was in 1978 -- from the Lee Collins
      'Oh Didn't He Ramble'. Also a perceptive entry in 'Dictionaire Du Jazz'.
      Not in Chilton nor Grove.

      Do we now know anymore ?

      Dave

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    • David Weiner
      ... Don t forget, Gerry, that many bands had tuba and string bass side by side at the same time - this is readily apparent in many of the Vitaphone shorts of
      Message 38 of 38 , Jul 26, 2010
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        >
        > So now limiting the discussion to "big band/large ensemble" and avoiding
        > string-bands, quartets/quintets: I had always assume that this
        > setting--for recordings--generally had tuba. As such I was looking for who
        > began using string bass as a replacement for tuba, if it concentrated in
        > one or a few individual groups.
        >
        > .
        >
        > -- Gerry
        >
        >
        Don't forget, Gerry, that many bands had tuba and string bass side by side
        at the same time - this is readily apparent in many of the Vitaphone shorts
        of 1927-30 - often, a band also had a banjoist and a guitarist playing
        simultaneously, too. There are numerous records - like Gus Arnheim's "One
        More Time," from 1931, where tuba is in use on the first half of the disc,
        with a switchover to string bass for the "hot" final choruses to add an
        extra measure of excitement to the performance.

        Dave Weiner
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