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Re: [RedHotJazz] Earres PRINCE : the lost pianist

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  • Bob Eagle
    My notes are as follows: EARRES PRINCE (piano) was born Earres M. Prince on 26 September 1896, possibly at Texas, Lee County, Arkansas. He enlisted in the US
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 28, 2008
      My notes are as follows:


      EARRES PRINCE (piano) was born Earres M. Prince on 26 September 1896, possibly at Texas, Lee County, Arkansas.
      He enlisted in the US Army on 26 September 1918.
      His Army service ended on 28 November 1918, when he was still a Private.
      He recorded at New York City in 1925 for OKeh, behind Sara Martin.
      He died on 23 April 1957 and was interred at Long Island National Cemetery, 2040 Wellwood Avenue, Farmingdale, New York 11735-1211, Section 2a Site 4499, on 26 April 1957.

      So, now we have identical birth and death dates but some discrepancy as to origin. I regret to say that I have no idea of the source of the report as to Arkansas origin.

      Bob

      Howard Rye <howard@...> wrote:
      International Musician reports of The Missourians show him as Earres M.
      Prince, which, given how rare the name is, strongly suggests that he is the
      Earres Martin Prince who registered for the draft in St. Louis in 1918, even
      though he is not shown as a musician and was working for the MK&T Freight
      Office. If this identification holds good he was born in Jackson, Missouri,
      on 26 September 1896.

      The Earres M. Prince born 1896 was a Private in the U.S. Army whose service
      started on 26 September 1918, and who died on 23 April 1957 and is buried in
      Long Island National Cemetery.

      He is not indexed in any census under the name Earres Prince. No doubt some
      lateral thinking about indexing errors would uncover him.

      It must be stressed that there is no proof that Earres Martin Prince
      1896-1957 is the pianist!

      Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
      howard@...
      Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098






      ---------------------------------
      Get the name you always wanted with the new y7mail email address.

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jeff PITET from France
      Howard, Bob, Thank you very much for those great news (for me!). I had a doubt about that Earres M. Prince, but that first name is quite rare. It is difficult
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 28, 2008
        Howard, Bob,

        Thank you very much for those great news (for me!). I had a doubt
        about that Earres M. Prince, but that first name is quite rare.
        It is difficult to get an idea about his talent because he never
        really had a chance to get a prominent rank with the tunes he played.
        Unfortunately, even his good friend Harry Dial fired him in 1946.

        There's a title named after him, "Prince's boogie", that he certainly
        wrote. Alfred Bell recorded it at the piano with Harry Dial's quartet
        (march 1950). There's only one broadcast of Dial with Prince at the
        piano recorded on august 27, 1946 (IAJRC7), but I don't own it. If you
        have the opportunity to listen to it, please tell me what you think
        about his playing.
        It seems that the last job Prince had was pianist at the LUCKY's (a
        stipper club) in New York, with Lester Boone and Harry Dial. When he
        died he was replaced by Jimmy Reynolds. So, this 1956 interview by
        Frank DRIGGS seems to be his final testimony.


        Whatever happens next, I would like to thank you sincerely for the
        wonderful help you provided me. So fast, so efficient!


        Jeff PITET


        --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Bob Eagle <prof_hi_jinx@...> wrote:
        >
        > My notes are as follows:
        >
        >
        > EARRES PRINCE (piano) was born Earres M. Prince on 26 September
        1896, possibly at Texas, Lee County, Arkansas.
        > He enlisted in the US Army on 26 September 1918.
        > His Army service ended on 28 November 1918, when he was still a
        Private.
        > He recorded at New York City in 1925 for OKeh, behind Sara Martin.
        > He died on 23 April 1957 and was interred at Long Island National
        Cemetery, 2040 Wellwood Avenue, Farmingdale, New York 11735-1211,
        Section 2a Site 4499, on 26 April 1957.
        >
        > So, now we have identical birth and death dates but some
        discrepancy as to origin. I regret to say that I have no idea of the
        source of the report as to Arkansas origin.
        >
        > Bob
        >
        > Howard Rye <howard@...> wrote:
        > International Musician reports of The Missourians show him
        as Earres M.
        > Prince, which, given how rare the name is, strongly suggests that he
        is the
        > Earres Martin Prince who registered for the draft in St. Louis in
        1918, even
        > though he is not shown as a musician and was working for the MK&T
        Freight
        > Office. If this identification holds good he was born in Jackson,
        Missouri,
        > on 26 September 1896.
        >
        > The Earres M. Prince born 1896 was a Private in the U.S. Army whose
        service
        > started on 26 September 1918, and who died on 23 April 1957 and is
        buried in
        > Long Island National Cemetery.
        >
        > He is not indexed in any census under the name Earres Prince. No
        doubt some
        > lateral thinking about indexing errors would uncover him.
        >
        > It must be stressed that there is no proof that Earres Martin Prince
        > 1896-1957 is the pianist!
        >
        > Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
        > howard@...
        > Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ---------------------------------
        > Get the name you always wanted with the new y7mail email address.
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Bob Eagle
        Howard is correct in implying that an unusual spelling is no guarantee of finding someone in the census. Using the next of kin in the 1918 draft card (Corra),
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 28, 2008
          Howard is correct in implying that an unusual spelling is no guarantee of finding someone in the census.

          Using the next of kin in the 1918 draft card (Corra), we find Cora and her husband Greely (both aged 38) at 2630 Randolph Street, St Louis in the 1910 Census, with 13-year-old son Eris (sic). Cora had had 3 children, of whom only 2 survived to 1910.

          Living at the same address (!) was the family of Harry Dial, then aged 3, born in Alabama to Charles and Clara Dial. This accords with what we know of Harry.

          The presence of Dial in the same building clinches it for me. Such long coincidences just don't happen without cause.

          Greely (a butcher) and Cora had been listed in St Louis in 1900, with son Eris (sic) M. Prince, whose birth month was September 1896, born MO.

          Just when it seemed we would all know how to pronounce Earres (as Eris), the 1920 Census lists him as Areas, with the family name spelled Prinz. He was a laborer at that time.

          He seems not to be listed in the 1930 census, but his 1942 draft card has him in NY, with wife Ruth, and he was working at Chancellor Manor, Newark. I assume this was a club, but it is only an assumption.

          None of this has any connection with Arkansas, so I think that doubt has been resolved, also.

          Bob


          Jeff PITET from France <thehidehoblog@...> wrote:
          Howard, Bob,

          Thank you very much for those great news (for me!). I had a doubt
          about that Earres M. Prince, but that first name is quite rare.
          It is difficult to get an idea about his talent because he never
          really had a chance to get a prominent rank with the tunes he played.
          Unfortunately, even his good friend Harry Dial fired him in 1946.

          There's a title named after him, "Prince's boogie", that he certainly
          wrote. Alfred Bell recorded it at the piano with Harry Dial's quartet
          (march 1950). There's only one broadcast of Dial with Prince at the
          piano recorded on august 27, 1946 (IAJRC7), but I don't own it. If you
          have the opportunity to listen to it, please tell me what you think
          about his playing.
          It seems that the last job Prince had was pianist at the LUCKY's (a
          stipper club) in New York, with Lester Boone and Harry Dial. When he
          died he was replaced by Jimmy Reynolds. So, this 1956 interview by
          Frank DRIGGS seems to be his final testimony.

          Whatever happens next, I would like to thank you sincerely for the
          wonderful help you provided me. So fast, so efficient!

          Jeff PITET

          --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Bob Eagle <prof_hi_jinx@...> wrote:
          >
          > My notes are as follows:
          >
          >
          > EARRES PRINCE (piano) was born Earres M. Prince on 26 September
          1896, possibly at Texas, Lee County, Arkansas.
          > He enlisted in the US Army on 26 September 1918.
          > His Army service ended on 28 November 1918, when he was still a
          Private.
          > He recorded at New York City in 1925 for OKeh, behind Sara Martin.
          > He died on 23 April 1957 and was interred at Long Island National
          Cemetery, 2040 Wellwood Avenue, Farmingdale, New York 11735-1211,
          Section 2a Site 4499, on 26 April 1957.
          >
          > So, now we have identical birth and death dates but some
          discrepancy as to origin. I regret to say that I have no idea of the
          source of the report as to Arkansas origin.
          >
          > Bob
          >
          > Howard Rye <howard@...> wrote:
          > International Musician reports of The Missourians show him
          as Earres M.
          > Prince, which, given how rare the name is, strongly suggests that he
          is the
          > Earres Martin Prince who registered for the draft in St. Louis in
          1918, even
          > though he is not shown as a musician and was working for the MK&T
          Freight
          > Office. If this identification holds good he was born in Jackson,
          Missouri,
          > on 26 September 1896.
          >
          > The Earres M. Prince born 1896 was a Private in the U.S. Army whose
          service
          > started on 26 September 1918, and who died on 23 April 1957 and is
          buried in
          > Long Island National Cemetery.
          >
          > He is not indexed in any census under the name Earres Prince. No
          doubt some
          > lateral thinking about indexing errors would uncover him.
          >
          > It must be stressed that there is no proof that Earres Martin Prince
          > 1896-1957 is the pianist!
          >
          > Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
          > howard@...
          > Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > Get the name you always wanted with the new y7mail email address.
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >






          ---------------------------------
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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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