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RE: [RedHotJazz] Re: Keppard was Tiny Parham

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  • David Brown
    Hello John Does anyone know the source for Keppard on the Jaspers, an old chestnut ? Well considered by nobody less than Max Harrison in Essential Jazz
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 8, 2008
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      Hello John

      Does anyone know the source for Keppard on the Jaspers, an old chestnut ?

      Well considered by nobody less than Max Harrison in 'Essential Jazz
      Records -1'. To précis. Gushee suggests Punch -- who it is definitely not.
      Harrison cites similarities with Shoffner but 1925 Shoffner and by 1927 he
      was too Louis. Also seeming anomalies between the two sides 'Stomp Time' and
      'It Must Be The Blues'. To me, the former is typical Keppard but the latter
      certainly more legato and nearer to Louis. Harrison suggests aural
      similarities Lee Collins or Ed Swayzee -- IF it is he on Morton's 'Deep
      Creek'. (And where else is he ?)

      Harrison comes down for Keppard and so do I. He was an uneven performer and
      in our previous discussion of him here I claimed to find some Louis in his
      later recordings.

      Dave






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    • spacelights
      ... latter ... Hi Dave: I would opt for Keppard on the Jaspers as well (although with a question mark): I hear his tone and phrasing on Stomp Time , also a
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 8, 2008
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        --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "David Brown" <johnhaleysims@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Also seeming anomalies between the two sides 'Stomp Time' and
        > 'It Must Be The Blues'. To me, the former is typical Keppard but the
        latter
        > certainly more legato and nearer to Louis.

        Hi Dave:

        I would opt for Keppard on the Jaspers as well (although with a
        question mark): I hear his tone and phrasing on "Stomp Time", also a
        characteristic delivery slightly ahead of the beat. Regarding the
        second tune: there seems to be a dearth of straight blues in Keppard's
        recorded output, so not much to compare this to. The cornet does take
        an approach similar to that on Keppard's Jazz Cardinals' "Salty Dog"
        of the previous year.

        John
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