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Re: [RedHotJazz] Re: Buddy Bolden Film

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  • Nick Dellow
    Wynton Marsalis is authenticating this movie. What does authenticating mean in this respect? Has he found the Bolden cylinder?** ... [Non-text portions of
    Message 1 of 47 , Nov 15, 2007
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      "Wynton Marsalis is authenticating this movie." What does "authenticating"
      mean in this respect? Has he found the Bolden cylinder?**


      On 15/11/2007, Tommer <tommersl@...> wrote:
      >
      > --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com <RedHotJazz%40yahoogroups.com>,
      > Agustín Pérez <ekebbbapg@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Though he never recorded, Bolden has been credited with influencing
      > > the sounds
      >
      > We can look at the historical example of Socrate who wasn't less
      > instrumental to philosophy than Bolden to Jazz. Socrate, out of his
      > own will and derivation of his own philosophy never "recorded" a
      > single word. Anything known about his works came from his students
      > like Platon.
      >
      > I believe it is of true value that Wynton Marsalis is authenticating
      > this movie.
      >
      > tommersl
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Andrew Homzy
      Both Howard and Albert focus on a very interesting point which has not been thoroughly discussed in the literature - of various ethnic musics, why did only
      Message 47 of 47 , Nov 17, 2007
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        Both Howard and Albert focus on a very interesting point which has
        not been thoroughly discussed in the literature - of various "ethnic"
        musics, why did only jazz pass from the folk stage, through the
        entertainment stage, and become an art music?

        Puerto Rican pianist/composer, Eddie Palmieri, made an album in the
        70s called "The Sun of Latin Music". When I heard this, I thought he
        was on the verge of doing for "salsa" what Ellington did for jazz.
        Alas, nothing more came from it.

        Jazz pianist Joe Zawinul said he had to leave Austria for fear he
        would get caught-up in the cycle of Austrian musicians forming/
        influencing Austrian musicians. He felt that for art to develop, it
        needed a cross-cultural mix.

        Cheers,

        Andrew Homzy, Montréal


        On 17-Nov-07, at 4:45 PM, Albert Haim wrote:

        > --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Howard Rye <howard@...> wrote:
        >
        > "The parallel that occurred to me was all those village brass bands
        > from the Balkans that occasionally emerge to play at world-music and
        > street-music festivals in Europe. In a way the really interesting
        > question is why a tradition of this kind spawned an "art music" in New
        > Orleans and not elsewhere. More generally, why is it jazz and blues
        > that has influenced all the popular music in the world and not klezmer
        > or flamenco, both of which have produced exceptional musicians and
        > singers?"
        >
        > Could the following provide a possible (or at least partial)
        > explanation? Flamenco and brass bands from the Balkans, etc. had roots
        > in the local traditions/sensibilities and, thus, no world-wide
        > attraction. In contrast, jazz grew from the combination of a wide
        > variety of sources/influences, African-American (blues,
        > negro-spirituals, etc), European (Spanish tinge, French creole,
        > Italians, Jews, the European instruments, etc.), and, as a
        > consequence, possessed a broader/universal appeal?
        >
        > Albert
        >
        > .
        >
        >



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