Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

was Louis Armstrong black?

Expand Messages
  • Gerard J. Fitzpatrick
    If, like me, you enjoy stories with Hitchcockian ironic endings, you ll appreciate this one (although you may be shocked as well). I ve been teaching for about
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 14, 2005
    • 0 Attachment
      If, like me, you enjoy stories with Hitchcockian ironic endings,
      you'll appreciate this one (although you may be shocked as well).
      I've been teaching for about 25 years at a well regarded college with
      generally very bright students. Yesterday, I met with a group of
      incoming freshmen who were registering for fall classes. As an ice
      breaker, I always ask new students what kind of music they like.
      Invariably, several will say "oldies," which usually means groups no
      more archaic than the Beatles. I take a perverse delight in noting
      that I too am an "oldies" fan and then watching their faces go blank
      as I mention some of the groups that members of this site know well.
      Anyway, I asked one student if he knew who Louis Armstrong was. "Of
      course," the student replied, as if I had asked him nothing more
      challenging than his own name, "he was the first man to walk on the
      moon." It gets worse -- the student was black.

      I told this shocker at the family dinner table last night,
      emphasizing the ironic fact that an African-American student of all
      people confused Louis Armstrong with Neil Armstrong. One of the
      dinner guests was my son's girl friend (like him, a bright college
      student) who, missing the point of my emphasis, inquired, "was Louis
      Armstrong black?" I swear I saw Hitchcock standing in the corner, a
      wry smile on his face.

      Gerard J. Fitzpatrick
    • P.W. Fenton
      At 08:52 PM 6/14/2005 +0000, Gerard J. Fitzpatrick wrote... ... That s one small step for a man, but one giant leap for Jazz. P.W. Fenton New Port Richey, FL
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 14, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        At 08:52 PM 6/14/2005 +0000, Gerard J. Fitzpatrick wrote...
        >I told this shocker at the family dinner table last night,
        >emphasizing the ironic fact that an African-American student of all
        >people confused Louis Armstrong with Neil Armstrong. One of the
        >dinner guests was my son's girl friend (like him, a bright college
        >student) who, missing the point of my emphasis, inquired, "was Louis
        >Armstrong black?" I swear I saw Hitchcock standing in the corner, a
        >wry smile on his face.

        That's one small step for a man, but one giant leap for Jazz.

        P.W. Fenton
        New Port Richey, FL
        http://BluesLand.Net - A comprehensive network of Blues related resources
      • vintagetenor
        Gerard, We are always amazed to hear stories like that. But I did some reserch on the web today, and, to answer your question: Yes, Louis Armstromg was black.
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 14, 2005
        • 0 Attachment
          Gerard,

          We are always amazed to hear stories like that.

          But I did some reserch on the web today, and, to answer your question: Yes, Louis Armstromg was black.

          Mike




          "Gerard J. Fitzpatrick" <gfitzpatrick@...> wrote:
          If, like me, you enjoy stories with Hitchcockian ironic endings,
          you'll appreciate this one (although you may be shocked as well).
          I've been teaching for about 25 years at a well regarded college with
          generally very bright students. Yesterday, I met with a group of
          incoming freshmen who were registering for fall classes. As an ice
          breaker, I always ask new students what kind of music they like.
          Invariably, several will say "oldies," which usually means groups no
          more archaic than the Beatles. I take a perverse delight in noting
          that I too am an "oldies" fan and then watching their faces go blank
          as I mention some of the groups that members of this site know well.
          Anyway, I asked one student if he knew who Louis Armstrong was. "Of
          course," the student replied, as if I had asked him nothing more
          challenging than his own name, "he was the first man to walk on the
          moon." It gets worse -- the student was black.

          I told this shocker at the family dinner table last night,
          emphasizing the ironic fact that an African-American student of all
          people confused Louis Armstrong with Neil Armstrong. One of the
          dinner guests was my son's girl friend (like him, a bright college
          student) who, missing the point of my emphasis, inquired, "was Louis
          Armstrong black?" I swear I saw Hitchcock standing in the corner, a
          wry smile on his face.

          Gerard J. Fitzpatrick




          ---------------------------------
          Yahoo! Groups Links

          To visit your group on the web, go to:
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/RedHotJazz/

          To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          RedHotJazz-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



          ---------------------------------
          Discover Yahoo!
          Find restaurants, movies, travel & more fun for the weekend. Check it out!

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • pryordodge@aol.com
          A better question: Is Michael Jackson black??? [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 14, 2005
          • 0 Attachment
            A better question: Is Michael Jackson black???


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Fredamhran@aol.com
            You wouldn t chuckle. I was recently talking to a woman who has been a fixture at every jazz session you could mention for more years than you would care to
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 15, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
              You wouldn't chuckle. I was recently talking to a woman who has been a
              fixture at every jazz session you could mention for more years than you would care
              to mention. When I told her I like Ma Rainey, the name drew a complete
              blank. She'd never heard of her.

              Cheers,

              Fred McCormick (I think)

              In a message dated 15/06/2005 15:39:45 GMT Standard Time,
              RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com writes:

              If, like me, you enjoy stories with Hitchcockian ironic endings,
              you'll appreciate this one (although you may be shocked as well).
              I've been teaching for about 25 years at a well regarded college with
              generally very bright students. Yesterday, I met with a group of
              incoming freshmen who were registering for fall classes. As an ice
              breaker, I always ask new students what kind of music they like.
              Invariably, several will say "oldies," which usually means groups no
              more archaic than the Beatles. I take a perverse delight in noting
              that I too am an "oldies" fan and then watching their faces go blank
              as I mention some of the groups that members of this site know well.
              Anyway, I asked one student if he knew who Louis Armstrong was. "Of
              course," the student replied, as if I had asked him nothing more
              challenging than his own name, "he was the first man to walk on the
              moon." It gets worse -- the student was black.

              I told this shocker at the family dinner table last night,
              emphasizing the ironic fact that an African-American student of all
              people confused Louis Armstrong with Neil Armstrong. One of the
              dinner guests was my son's girl friend (like him, a bright college
              student) who, missing the point of my emphasis, inquired, "was Louis
              Armstrong black?" I swear I saw Hitchcock standing in the corner, a
              wry smile on his face.

              Gerard J. Fitzpatrick






              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.