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Re: [RedHotJazz] Small combo "hot" swing bands!

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  • Howard Rye
    on 10/9/07 10:39, Patrice Champarou at patrice.champarou@free.fr wrote: My brother often insists that there was no jazz tradition among the Gypsy community
    Message 1 of 33 , Sep 10, 2007
      on 10/9/07 10:39, Patrice Champarou at patrice.champarou@... wrote:


      My brother often insists that there was no jazz tradition among the Gypsy
      community prior to Django, and the still vivid style which did become
      traditional owes mostly everything to him. He always had an incredible
      number of followers and my limited experience in my brother's group proved
      that even a very "average" combo playing Django's music was sure to appeal
      to popular audience. There has been a recent "revival" of the so-called
      Gypsy Swing, with what I would call great technicians who are not *all* good
      musicians IMO, however fast and loud they can play; but also a number of
      "greats", and very clever insertion of the style into their music by good
      and comparatevely young French singers. Besides large festivals like Samois,
      many obscure groups have always kept playing that music in small cafés like,
      for instance, the one hidden in the midlle of the StOuen/Clignancourt flea
      market touching the north of Paris. I do not like exaggerated and
      enthusiastic statements, but in this case I think it is not an exaggeration
      to say that Django's music is still alive here ;-)

      No need for joking, Patrice. In my experience it's a rare French town that
      doesn't yield at least one group of 'gypsy-swing' buskers on market day.

      One group I encountered on the streets of Montpellier a couple of years ago
      was so good I bought their CD-R. They were called Taraf de Ialomita. I still
      haven't bothered to find out what it means!

      We can argue from now until kingdom come whether this stuff is really jazz,
      but it's certainly really very enjoyable and rewarding music.

      Is Jean Vaissade's 1930 recording of 'Sonny Boy' jazz? If so, had Django
      really fed into Roma tradition this early. As Django had worked with
      Vaissade it's possible. And anyway this a trick question in view of the
      presence of Felix Valvert.

      If anyone's looking for the roots of Django's approach to jazz it can be
      found in the recordings of Eddie South. I suspect some Roma musicians were
      as strongly influenced by South as he was by them and long before anyone had
      heard of Django.

      Personally I think Oscar Aléman is a far superior jazz musician to Django,
      and much prefer listening to his recordings in the Hot Club idiom than to
      the originals, but having said that I'll go and hide in a bunker!




      Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
      howard@...
      Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098




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    • David Brown
      You will have to tell the problems --- I am confused as you find them interesting . Seminal in their iconoclasm, revealing the flaws in both. They are
      Message 33 of 33 , Sep 15, 2007
        You will have to tell the problems --- I am confused as you find them
        'interesting'.

        Seminal in their iconoclasm, revealing the flaws in both.

        They are musical biographies, putting the music first, indulging in personal
        detail to illustrate the music.

        Bergreen I once picked up but replaced on the bookshop shelf after half a
        page. He is a musically ignorant professional biographer.

        Dave








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