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Re: [RedHotJazz] Small combo "hot" swing bands!

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  • Patrice Champarou
    ... From: David Brown To: Sent: Monday, September 10, 2007 10:55 AM Subject: RE: [RedHotJazz] Small
    Message 1 of 33 , Sep 10, 2007
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      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "David Brown" <johnhaleysims@...>
      To: <RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, September 10, 2007 10:55 AM
      Subject: RE: [RedHotJazz] Small combo "hot" swing bands!


      > The term 'Swing' is usually reserved for music of the 'Swing Era', not
      > possible to define exactly but certainly post 1930.
      >
      > 'Hot' is usually used in discussion of music of the 20s, although can be
      > used descriptively outside that period, as can 'Swing' outside the 30s.
      >
      > So unique was it, that the music of Django defies normal categorisation
      > but,
      > with its classical and European influences and the exclusive use of string
      > instruments, it is difficult to consider 'hot'. However, it is also very
      > far
      > from archetypical 'swing', offering a unique rhythmic momentum nearer
      > maybe
      > to chug.
      >
      > But, don't get me wrong, Django was an authentic, original and
      > unclassifiable genius.

      My brother often insists that there was no jazz tradition among the Gypsy
      community prior to Django, and the still vivid style which did become
      traditional owes mostly everything to him. He always had an incredible
      number of followers and my limited experience in my brother's group proved
      that even a very "average" combo playing Django's music was sure to appeal
      to popular audience. There has been a recent "revival" of the so-called
      Gypsy Swing, with what I would call great technicians who are not *all* good
      musicians IMO, however fast and loud they can play; but also a number of
      "greats", and very clever insertion of the style into their music by good
      and comparatevely young French singers. Besides large festivals like Samois,
      many obscure groups have always kept playing that music in small cafés like,
      for instance, the one hidden in the midlle of the StOuen/Clignancourt flea
      market touching the north of Paris. I do not like exaggerated and
      enthusiastic statements, but in this case I think it is not an exaggeration
      to say that Django's music is still alive here ;-)

      Patrice
    • David Brown
      You will have to tell the problems --- I am confused as you find them interesting . Seminal in their iconoclasm, revealing the flaws in both. They are
      Message 33 of 33 , Sep 15, 2007
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        You will have to tell the problems --- I am confused as you find them
        'interesting'.

        Seminal in their iconoclasm, revealing the flaws in both.

        They are musical biographies, putting the music first, indulging in personal
        detail to illustrate the music.

        Bergreen I once picked up but replaced on the bookshop shelf after half a
        page. He is a musically ignorant professional biographer.

        Dave








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