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Re: How pop tunes came into the standard Dixieland repertoire

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  • bill thieme
    ... Bill Thieme ... popular repertoire - one need only think of the ODJB s Indiana and Darktown Strutters Ball , long thought to have been the first jazz
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 6, 2007
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      --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, Michael Rader <Rader.Michael@...>
      wrote:
      >Wasn't Jazz also pop music at one time?

      Bill Thieme
      > The very earliest jazz recordings included many songs from the
      popular repertoire - one need only think of the ODJB's "Indiana"
      and "Darktown Strutters' Ball", long thought to have been the first
      jazz recording ever. The ODJB subsequently recorded much material
      from the "popular side" of the repertoire (including "Singing the
      Blues", and is Margie a popular song or a jazz standard?). Another
      well-known example is "Jada", which was recorded by both Wilbur
      Sweatman and the New Orleans Jazz Band.
      >
      >
      > Michael Rader
      >
      >
      > > -----Urspr√ľngliche Nachricht-----
      > > Von: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
      > > Gesendet: 06.09.07 14:12:07
      > > An: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com
      > > Betreff: [RedHotJazz] Re: How pop tunes came into the standard
      Dixieland repertoire
      >
      >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > The music surely always drew on a fairly wide repertoire? The
      1942
      > > Bunk Johnson Jazz Information session has him playing some, by
      then,
      > > quite archaic songs drawn from popular music: When I Leave the
      World
      > > Behind, Big Chief Battleaxe, and Brown Eyes Goodbye,
      misremembered by
      > > Bunk as Bluebells Goodbye. His 1946 American Music session with
      Don
      > > Ewell and Alphonse Steele includes renditions of I'll Take You
      Home
      > > Again, Kathleen and In the Gloaming.
      > > Robert Greenwood.
      > >
      > > --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "David W. Littlefield"
      <dwlit@>
      > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Hi Gang. How did key pop tunes come into the standard Dixieland
      > > repertoire?
      > > > Who introduced 'em, or made 'em popular enough so that
      dixielanders
      > > > adopted 'em?
      > > >
      > > > It's a reasonable assumption that "Memories of you", for
      example,
      > > > came in via the Benny Goodman Quartet. Did "Sweet Sue" come in
      via
      > > > Jimmie Noone's Apex Club
      > > > orch.?
      > > > Etc. Etc. Etc.
      > > >
      > > > Speaking of Noone, I keep forgetting just how wonderful many of
      his
      > > > records were. I looked in Worlds Records yesterday and found
      two 4-
      > > CD sets
      > > > l. JSP (selected works incl. Noone as side person)
      > > > 2. Definitive (complete works, ie records under his name)
      > > >
      > > > --Sheik
      > > > http://americanmusiccaravan.com
      > > > "20s-30s Fake Book" coming soon!
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      _____________________________________________________________________
      > Der WEB.DE SmartSurfer hilft bis zu 70% Ihrer Onlinekosten zu
      sparen!
      > http://smartsurfer.web.de/?mc=100071&distributionid=000000000066
      >
    • Olivier Douville
      Hello folks according to you who played on the cornet in the ida Cox s Coffin blues recording ? thanks, best regards to all of you` OD ... Michael Rader
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 7, 2007
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        Hello folks according to you who played on the cornet in the ida Cox's
        "Coffin blues" recording ?
        thanks, best regards to all of you`
        OD




        --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com <mailto:RedHotJazz%40yahoogroups.com> ,
        Michael Rader <Rader.Michael@...>
        wrote:
        >Wasn't Jazz also pop music at one time?

        Bill Thieme
        > The very earliest jazz recordings included many songs from the
        popular repertoire - one need only think of the ODJB's "Indiana"
        and "Darktown Strutters' Ball", long thought to have been the first
        jazz recording ever. The ODJB subsequently recorded much material
        from the "popular side" of the repertoire (including "Singing the
        Blues", and is Margie a popular song or a jazz standard?). Another
        well-known example is "Jada", which was recorded by both Wilbur
        Sweatman and the New Orleans Jazz Band.
        >
        >
        > Michael Rader
        >
        >
        > > -----Urspr√ľngliche Nachricht-----
        > > Von: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com <mailto:RedHotJazz%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > Gesendet: 06.09.07 14:12:07
        > > An: RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com <mailto:RedHotJazz%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > Betreff: [RedHotJazz] Re: How pop tunes came into the standard
        Dixieland repertoire
        >
        >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > The music surely always drew on a fairly wide repertoire? The
        1942
        > > Bunk Johnson Jazz Information session has him playing some, by
        then,
        > > quite archaic songs drawn from popular music: When I Leave the
        World
        > > Behind, Big Chief Battleaxe, and Brown Eyes Goodbye,
        misremembered by
        > > Bunk as Bluebells Goodbye. His 1946 American Music session with
        Don
        > > Ewell and Alphonse Steele includes renditions of I'll Take You
        Home
        > > Again, Kathleen and In the Gloaming.
        > > Robert Greenwood.
        > >
        > > --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com <mailto:RedHotJazz%40yahoogroups.com> ,
        "David W. Littlefield"
        <dwlit@>
        > > wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Hi Gang. How did key pop tunes come into the standard Dixieland
        > > repertoire?
        > > > Who introduced 'em, or made 'em popular enough so that
        dixielanders
        > > > adopted 'em?
        > > >
        > > > It's a reasonable assumption that "Memories of you", for
        example,
        > > > came in via the Benny Goodman Quartet. Did "Sweet Sue" come in
        via
        > > > Jimmie Noone's Apex Club
        > > > orch.?
        > > > Etc. Etc. Etc.
        > > >
        > > > Speaking of Noone, I keep forgetting just how wonderful many of
        his
        > > > records were. I looked in Worlds Records yesterday and found
        two 4-
        > > CD sets
        > > > l. JSP (selected works incl. Noone as side person)
        > > > 2. Definitive (complete works, ie records under his name)
        > > >
        > > > --Sheik
        > > > http://americanmusiccaravan.com
        > > > "20s-30s Fake Book" coming soon!
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        __________________________________________________________
        > Der WEB.DE SmartSurfer hilft bis zu 70% Ihrer Onlinekosten zu
        sparen!
        > http://smartsurfer.web.de/?mc=100071&distributionid=000000000066
        <http://smartsurfer.web.de/?mc=100071&distributionid=000000000066>
        >




        --










        Olivier Douville


        Directeur de publication de PSYCHOLOGIE CLINIQUE

        22, rue de la Tour d'Auvergne 75009 Paris
        tel : 06 77 69 24 51

        douvilleolivier@...


        liens
        http://www.dunod.com/pages/ouvrages/ficheouvrage.asp?id=49180
        http://www.psycho-ressources.com/olivier-douville.html













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