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Paul Whiteman

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  • Michael Ullman
    It s a little late to add this, but the collection Swing That Music! has After You ve Gone clocking in at 3:04. Michael Ullman Michael Ullman 136 Woodward St.
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 3 9:49 AM
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      It's a little late to add this, but the collection
      Swing That Music! has After You've Gone clocking in at
      3:04.

      Michael Ullman

      Michael Ullman
      136 Woodward St.
      Newton, Mass. 02461
      617-964-6994
      cell--617-429-5611



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    • David W. Littlefield
      Hi Gang. How did key pop tunes come into the standard Dixieland repertoire? Who introduced em, or made em popular enough so that dixielanders adopted em?
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 5 12:31 PM
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        Hi Gang. How did key pop tunes come into the standard Dixieland repertoire?
        Who introduced 'em, or made 'em popular enough so that dixielanders
        adopted 'em?

        It's a reasonable assumption that "Memories of you", for example,
        came in via the Benny Goodman Quartet. Did "Sweet Sue" come in via
        Jimmie Noone's Apex Club
        orch.?
        Etc. Etc. Etc.

        Speaking of Noone, I keep forgetting just how wonderful many of his
        records were. I looked in Worlds Records yesterday and found two 4-CD sets
        l. JSP (selected works incl. Noone as side person)
        2. Definitive (complete works, ie records under his name)

        --Sheik
        http://americanmusiccaravan.com
        "20s-30s Fake Book" coming soon!
      • Howard Rye
        on 5/9/07 20:31, David W. Littlefield at dwlit@patriot.net wrote: It s a reasonable assumption that Memories of you , for example, came in via the Benny
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 5 1:11 PM
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          on 5/9/07 20:31, David W. Littlefield at dwlit@... wrote:


          It's a reasonable assumption that "Memories of you", for example, came in
          via the Benny Goodman Quartet.

          Wouldn't Louis Armstrong's October 1930 version be a better guess?

          Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
          howard@...
          Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • David W. Littlefield
          Hi Howard. That s the kind of thing I want to determine for as many tunes as I can. I assume it depends on what musicians were listening to, what grabbed em,
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 5 8:54 PM
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            Hi Howard. That's the kind of thing I want to determine for as many
            tunes as I can. I assume it depends on what musicians were listening
            to, what grabbed 'em, what besides personal taste caused the tunes to
            become part of the *tradition*, hence to be played regularly for decades.

            Thanks.
            --Sheik

            At 04:11 PM 09/05/07, you wrote:
            >on 5/9/07 20:31, David W. Littlefield at
            ><mailto:dwlit%40patriot.net>dwlit@... wrote:
            >
            >It's a reasonable assumption that "Memories of you", for example, came in
            >via the Benny Goodman Quartet.
            >~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~`
            >Wouldn't Louis Armstrong's October 1930 version be a better guess?
            >
            >Howard Rye, 20 Coppermill Lane, London, England, E17 7HB
            ><mailto:howard%40coppermill.demon.co.uk>howard@...
            >Tel/FAX: +44 20 8521 1098
          • Robert Greenwood
            The music surely always drew on a fairly wide repertoire? The 1942 Bunk Johnson Jazz Information session has him playing some, by then, quite archaic songs
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 6 5:07 AM
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              The music surely always drew on a fairly wide repertoire? The 1942
              Bunk Johnson Jazz Information session has him playing some, by then,
              quite archaic songs drawn from popular music: When I Leave the World
              Behind, Big Chief Battleaxe, and Brown Eyes Goodbye, misremembered by
              Bunk as Bluebells Goodbye. His 1946 American Music session with Don
              Ewell and Alphonse Steele includes renditions of I'll Take You Home
              Again, Kathleen and In the Gloaming.
              Robert Greenwood.

              --- In RedHotJazz@yahoogroups.com, "David W. Littlefield" <dwlit@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Hi Gang. How did key pop tunes come into the standard Dixieland
              repertoire?
              > Who introduced 'em, or made 'em popular enough so that dixielanders
              > adopted 'em?
              >
              > It's a reasonable assumption that "Memories of you", for example,
              > came in via the Benny Goodman Quartet. Did "Sweet Sue" come in via
              > Jimmie Noone's Apex Club
              > orch.?
              > Etc. Etc. Etc.
              >
              > Speaking of Noone, I keep forgetting just how wonderful many of his
              > records were. I looked in Worlds Records yesterday and found two 4-
              CD sets
              > l. JSP (selected works incl. Noone as side person)
              > 2. Definitive (complete works, ie records under his name)
              >
              > --Sheik
              > http://americanmusiccaravan.com
              > "20s-30s Fake Book" coming soon!
              >
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